Shroud of Turin Researcher: “Very close to proving the shroud was used to bury the historic Jesus.”

Iannone pointed out that this showing is the first since 1988 carbon-dating results, which purported to show the shroud was a medieval hoax, were debunked. “The public exposition provides a vehicle for getting the truth about the shroud to the world that was misled, in a major way, by the media reports of 1988 and following years,” he said. Schwortz said the 1988 research “has always been the primary piece of scientific evidence that disputed the shroud’s possible authenticity.”

In a video made shortly before his death three years ago, Ray Rogers, a chemist from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, said that despite wishing to prove the shroud a fake, he found that the “worst possible” sample of the shroud was taken for the 1988 carbon dating. The research, he said, was performed on an area of the relic that was repaired in the 16th century.

Rogers, who helped lead the Shroud of Turin Research Project and had once strongly argued in support of the carbon dating research, said in the video made in March 2005 that after dismissing the carbon-dating claims, he came “very close to proving the shroud was used to bury the historic Jesus.”

Schwortz said that since Rogers’ discovery, “several more peer-reviewed articles” have corroborated Rogers’ findings.” In 2008, he said, nine scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory independently re-examined Rogers’ work and further corroborated his conclusions. The findings, he added, are also very significant because the bulk of scientific evidence gathered before 1988 favored the shroud’s authenticity, but all of it was summarily discarded after the carbon-dating finding. Rogers’ work “is probably the most important scientific contribution made supporting the shroud’s authenticity in more than 20 years,” Schwortz said, adding that any future carbon dating, if it is to be taken seriously, must be “accomplished openly, with complete transparency.”

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