Author claims little known veil illustrates Christ’s resurrection

In this interview with ZENIT, Badde explained some of the conclusions of his research on this veil, and why he thinks it is bound to change the world.

ZENIT: Some have referred to the Veil of Manoppello as belonging to Veronica, and having the image of Jesus’ face from before the Crucifixion. Your investigation, however, led you to a different conclusion. Could you clarify what this veil is?

Badde: This veil has had many names in the last 2000 years — maintaining only its unique character in the same time.

It is, in fact, “the napkin” or “handkerchief” (in Greek: soudarion), to which St. John the Evangelist is referring in his report of the discovery of the empty tomb by St. Peter and himself, that they saw “apart” from the cloths (including the shroud of Joseph from Arimathea) in which Jesus had been buried.

This napkin, St. John says, had originally been laying upon the Face of Jesus.

This veil had to be kept completely secret right away — together with the Shroud of Turin — in the first community of the Apostles in Jerusalem due to the ritual impurity in Judaism of everything stemming from a grave. And it remained secret for many centuries.

This explains why it had been bearing many different names in the course of history after it appeared in public some hundred years later in the Anatolian town of Edessa for the first time.

Among all these different names are for instance: The Edessa Veil, The Image or Letter of King Abgar, The Camuliana Veil, The Mandylion, The Image Not Made by Man’s Hand (in Greek: acheiropoieton), The Fourfolded Veil (in Greek: tetradiplon) or — today — The Holy Face (Il Volto Santo). The “Veil of Veronica” is just another name of all those that meant altogether this very veil in Manoppello.

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