Married priests: The unfortunate and scandalous “downside”.

We then learn the details of Canon Clitherow’s personal life.  He married his first wife in 1982 and they had two children, but they divorced in 2002.  He married his second wife that year, a women he had first met in 1992 when she was a high school student and he the chaplain of her school.  This marriage also produced two children, but in March 2011 he announced to the congregation that he was divorcing a second time.

The Mail lets us know that rumors at the church swirled around this second divorce, with tongues wagging about the vicar’s affair with a blonde divorcee who was a member of the choir.  At the time of his divorce the vicar informed his bishop that the marriage had broken down but that there was no other person involved. The vicar went on sick leave following Easter services, citing stress as the culprit — and then married the blonde divorcee at a private ceremony at a registry office over the Christmas holidays.

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Editor’s note: The Catholic Church can look forward to these new (for us Catholics) types of scandals, now that we are accepting married Anglican/Episcopalian priests into the pope’s new ordinariate. Nothing wrong with the ordinariate … I’m just saying that we better start getting ready for this new type of moral assault on the Catholic priesthood.

Celibate or not … there’s still no substitute for fidelity and chastity … inside or outside of matrimony … by layman and/or priest.

1 Comment

  1. I doubt the Anglicans that accept such behavior from their vicars will come into the Catholic church, but there are married priests in the eastern rites and a few other exceptions. The rule (which AFAIK extends to the ordinariate) is you can’t marry after you become a priest.

    Are they the existing rites in communion with Rome (and have been for centuries) that permit married men to become priests the source of great scandals that I just haven’t read about?


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