Notre Dame vs. Bishop Jenky: Academia purportedly is about the pursuit of knowledge, but today most academics seem to be chiefly concerned about ideological purity and attacking ideas that offend their preconceived prejudices.

Father Wilson Miscamble, a priest of the Congregation of the Holy Cross and a history professor at Notre Dame defends Bishop Jenky from the attacks of members of the Notre Dame faculty:

Text and video

Wacky keynote addresses at annual assemblies of the LCWR (Leadership Conference of Women Religious) speak volumes.

As anyone who’s a member of a large organization knows: leadership is often way, way out in front of those they lead. . .sometimes too far out.

Read ’em (and weep)

Secretary Sebelius admits to Congress: Obama regime was woefully negligent in promulgating HHS Mandate.

…the spotlight was again on Secretary Sebelius yesterday during testimony before a congressional committee.

During her appearance, Sebelius was asked about her claim that the HHS mandate “strikes the appropriate balance” between religious liberty and so called “preventative services.”

She admitted, “I am not a lawyer,” and that no significant legal groundwork was done to determine how the new mandate would impact our religious freedom. She admitted that no legal memos exist; only that there were “discussions.”

The truth is the legal justification for the new HHS mandate is full of holes.

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Three “classes” of priests: “The shepherd is to be loved, the hireling is to be tolerated, of the robber must we beware.”

Saint Augustine

A hired man, who is not a shepherd and whose sheep are not his own, sees a wolf coming and leaves the sheep and runs away, and the wolf catches and scatters them.
Preaching on this verse, St. Augustine once said, “The shepherd is to be loved, the hireling is to be tolerated, of the robber must we beware.” He refers these three characters to three classes of priests.

On Good Shepherd Sunday, we do well to consider the qualities of these characters and, even more, how the faithful ought to relate to their priests and bishops. Why is it that the people should tolerate the hireling?

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Radical feminism is … at its very core … unnatural and unholy

Consider the moving story of Kate Spicer: “I’m childless at 42 and haunted by the baby I aborted at 18″. I offer here parts of that story: “Terminating a pregnancy seemed far cleverer than pushing double buggies in small-town Devon, which is what some of my peers were doing after their O-levels.

“Today, I feel more emotional, guilty almost, about that bundle of cells I got rid of. In the bitterest of ironies, that terminated pregnancy remains the sum total of my reproductive history. Throughout my adulthood, I have sometimes felt broody, but have never let myself dwell on it.

“Using logic and reason, I pushed these instinctive urges from my mind: you don’t have enough money, you don’t have a solid relationship, you have no career stability, men can’t be relied on, you are too insecure. The family unit — Mum, Dad, two children — looked dull, claustrophobic and suburban. I was in denial, but every now and again my real feelings would break through the tough-girl rationale.

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Ya gotta have heart…

Those familiar with scripture will readily recall that the heart has a prominent place in both testaments.

In the Old Testament, God complains, through the prophets, about the superficial worship of the people, who offer material sacrifice, but their hearts are far from him. Proverbs speaks of wisdom entering one’s heart (Prov 2:10), the need to trust the Lord with all one’s heart (3.5), how a perverted heart devises evil (Prov 6.14), and that the Lord weighs the heart (Prov 21:2).

At the beginning of the New Testament, Mary is described as treasuring and pondering events in her heart. Then, there is that intense preacher in the desert, St. John the Baptist, who had people travel from all over the country into the desert to experience his ministry. What did his speech have that converted such difficult categories of people, like the greedy tax collectors, the tough military, and the professional prostitutes?  Even the haughty King Herod listened to his prisoner’s words.

The key is found in his description as ardens et lucens, ardent and illuminating. He appealed to both the mind, and to the heart. Malachi foretold a prophet who would turn the hearts of fathers to the children, and the hearts of children to their fathers. This was mentioned by Gabriel to John’s father, Zachary, in the Temple.

The Letters of St. Paul frequently speak in reference to the heart, such as when he asks Philemon to “refresh [his] heart in Christ” (Phlm1:20).  Christ always pleads with others in the hope their exchange enlarges his hearers’ hearts towards him.

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It is no coincidence that some of the Gay Liberation Front’s most zealous leaders are religious sisters and ex-sisters.

For example, lesbian activist Virginia “Ginny” Apuzzo, a former Sister of Charity, has founded numerous homosexual local and national organizations including the New York City and the Hudson Valley Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Community Centers and was Executive Director of the NY-based National Gay Task Force. She also served as Vice-Chair of the New York State AIDS Advisory Council, and was the highest-ranking gay or lesbian official to work in the White House.

The late Jean O’Leary, a former Sister of the Holy Humility of Mary, was an early spokesman for the male-dominated Gay Activist Alliance, which she left to form the Lesbian Feminist Liberation. She later co-chaired the National Gay Task Force and helped build the National Gay Rights Advocates and co-founded National Coming Out Day. Like Apuzzo, she played a major role in White House “gay” politics.

Unlike Apuzzo and O’Leary, Sister Jeannine Gramick worked from inside AmChurch to co-found the homosexual dream machine known as New Ways Ministry with her Salvatorian sidekick, Fr. Robert Nugent. [4] Together, they ushered in the golden age of the wholesale homosexual colonization of male and female religious orders in the United States which lasted from 1978 to 1998, and continues even today, albeit, on a smaller scale.

In 1972, the School Sisters of Notre Dame (SSND), Baltimore Province, over the objections of fellow sisters, released Gramick from her teaching assignment at the College of Notre Dame so that she might pursue a career in “gay” politics starting with the formation of Dignity/Washington, D.C., and Dignity/Baltimore. She later joined the (Marxist) Quixote Center which served as the staging base for the establishment of New Ways Ministry in 1978, and its many front organizations including the Catholic Coalition for Gay Civil Rights, the Center for Homophobia Education, Catholic Parents Network, Sisters in Gay Ministry Associated (SIGMA) and the Conference of Catholic Lesbians (CCL), the last two organizations directed at the recruitment and political networking of lesbian religious in Catholic active orders.

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