The basic lines of ‘pro-choice’ rhetoric were sketched out by Catholic theologians, at the residence of America’s most famous Catholic family, nine years before the Roe v. Wade decision.

The Catholic role in repealing the laws on contraception is only part of the story. As Phil Lawler reported in his book, Faithful Departed: The Collapse of Boston’s Catholic Culture, the scheme to legalize abortion took place not in a candle-lit basement where Satanists celebrated black masses, but at the home of America’s leading Catholic family, the Kennedys.

In 1964, Lawler wrote, leftist Catholic priests Robert DrinanCharles Curran and other theologians convened at Hyannis Port, Mass., with the brain trust behind the Senate campaign of Robert F. Kennedy.  They concocted the teaching that abortion could be justified if it were the “lesser of two evils” and that “a blanket prohibition might be more harmful to the common good”  because political leaders might  “impose their own private views on public policy. …The skillful operatives of the Kennedy family would round up the votes to end restrictions on abortion and eventually provide public subsidies. The Jesuit theologians would provide protective cover” and sabotage Catholic teaching in the universities. “Thus, the basic lines of ‘pro-choice’ rhetoric were sketched out by Catholic theologians, at the residence of America’s most famous Catholic family, nine years before the Roe v. Wade decision.”

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1 Comment

  1. For students of history, playing “what-if” is virtually irresistable, if also without resolution.

    Had they lived, would John and/or Bobby Kennedy have been true to their Faith and, therefore, pro-life? Extremely doubtful: neither having ever, to my knowledge, expressed publicly any opposition to abortion-on-demand. Indeed, there was no need for either to venture publicly any opinion or stance during their political (and mortal) lives.

    Martin Luther King, Jr., is another story. For he did, in fact, express explicit opposition to abortion, as the taking of human life. He knew of its “disparate impact” upon his community. One of his daughters professes that belief and conviction to this day. Furthermore, she firmly believes that her late father would have held steadfast, had his life not been cut short.

    Given all else that has happened since then, particularly in the realm of African-American politics and politicians, I can’t help but wonder if she’s right.

    As I said: “irresistable, if also without resolution.”


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