What about those “more Catholic than the Church Neener-Neener-Neener” people?

inquisition

Posted by Anonymous August 30, 2013
at 2:11 PM

And what of the harm that Voris and this site exemplify, the harm that jerk-evangelists (force-feeding the false gospel of “more Catholic than the Church Neener-Neener-Neener”) can do to God’s Church?! And then Voris and this blogger have the huevos to insult laymen who have devoted their professional and personal lives to strengthening people in the Faith! I’ll take one Kresta or Akin or Shea to ten Vorises any day. I refuse to watch Church Militant (formerly “Real Catholic”) TV, or follow a rising number of these sorts of blogs, simply on principle.

Furthermore, there is a profound difference between being a “mercenary” or climber and a Catholic professional. Our Lord said that we have a right to our pay, and the Church certainly supports laymen making an honest living. Finally this post does nothing to address Catholic priest (not “NeoCatholic” — that old hateful fiction) Fr. Longenecker’s larger point that we have _no idea_ if these men are in fact plowing most of their salaries right back into their ministries!

Kristen J — profoundlycatholic.wordpress.com
(and former full-time paid Catholic reporter at Phoenix’ The Catholic Sun)

Link

Editor’s note: What a lovely bunch of coconuts – Catholics all! Who says God has no sense of humor? Seriously though – how much was the (Luke 5) massive harvest of fishes worth – in 1st century AD dollars – or drachmas? Knowing how God typically works – it probably constituted about three years worth of ordinary fishing income. That may also be the reason Jesus later needed to pluck a gold coin from the mouth of a fish, in order to pay the taxes due on all of that! (See Matthew 17)

Luke 5:1-11 And it came to pass, that when the multitudes pressed upon him to hear the word of God, he stood by the lake of Genesareth, (2) And saw two ships standing by the lake: but the fishermen were gone out of them and were washing their nets. (3) And going into one of the ships that was Simon’s, he desired him to draw back a little from the land. And sitting, he taught the multitudes out of the ship. (4) Now when he had ceased to speak, he said to Simon: Launch out into the deep and let down your nets for a draught. (5) And Simon answering said to him: Master, we have laboured all the night and have taken nothing: but at thy word I will let down the net. (6) And when they had done this, they enclosed a very great multitude of fishes: and their net broke. (7) And they beckoned to their partners that were in the other ship, that they should come and help them. And they came and filled both the ships, so that they were almost sinking. (8) Which when Simon Peter saw, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying: Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord. (9) For he was wholly astonished, and all that were with him, at the draught of the fishes which they had taken. (10) And so were also James and John, the sons of Zebedee, who were Simon’s partners. And Jesus saith to Simon: Fear not: from henceforth thou shalt catch men. (11) And having brought their ships to land, leaving all things, they followed him.

******

From the Gospel account one could easily infer that Peter and the other apostles were able to promptly leave everything behind and follow Jesus because they now had the means at their disposal – thanks to Christ and the supernatural draught of fishes – to provide for their family’s needs, during their absence. God takes care if his people today as well, so let’s not be overly critical, when it comes to cash.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with money and there’s nothing inherently wrong with earning a good salary. It’s the inordinate love of money that gets people into trouble – often leading them to make dangerous compromises. There’s the problem!

1 Timothy 6:7-12 For we brought nothing into this world: and certainly we can carry nothing out. (8) But having food and wherewith to be covered, with these we are content. (9) For they that will become rich fall into temptation and into the snare of the devil and into many unprofitable and hurtful desires, which drown men into destruction and perdition. (10) For the desire of money is the root of all evils; which some coveting have erred from the faith and have entangled themselves in many sorrows. (11) But thou, O man of God, fly these things: and pursue justice, godliness, faith, charity, patience, mildness. (12) Fight the good fight of faith. Lay hold on eternal life, whereunto thou art called and be it confessed a good confession before many witnesses.

Amen!

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4 Comments

  1. “It’s the inordinate love of money that gets people into trouble…” (emphasis added)

    Precisely. How many misquote the ancient aphorism by saying: “Money is the root of all evil”?

  2. Gotta add here: your headline—especially the “…neener-neener-neener” part—is priceless.

  3. Well I thought it was an excellent post! πŸ˜€
    Anybody that detests the V-man and all its works gets a thumbs up from this side! πŸ™‚ Lots of good points that I always have taken as a critique against that person . . . but I imagine that is well known by followers of our discussions here-in?

    No surprises there then.
    Thanks Doug for posting it!

    • I thought you would like it. The “Neener, Neener” thing was kind of funny, too!

      Doug


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