Why does the court ban the pictures but allow the decrepit underlying conduct?

The U.S. Supreme Court decided on Monday to not review the case of Scott v. Saint John’s Church in the Wilderness, a case that involved a lower court banning display of explicit abortion images from being shown where children are likely to view them.

The New York Times recalled that the case originated from a 2005 pro-life outdoor protest on Palm Sunday at an Episcopal church in Denver. The protestors were apparently unhappy with the church’s pro-abortion stance, and protested by showing large pictures of aborted fetuses, upsetting some of the 200 children who were present.

After the church sued Kenneth T. Scott, one of the people behind the protest, the Colorado Court of Appeals placed a ban on “displaying large posters or similar displays depicting gruesome images of mutilated fetuses or dead bodies in a manner reasonably likely to be viewed by children under 12.”

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Preacher outside abortion clinic climbs into tree to avoid cops


On Saturday, July 17, cops would not allow Wallace to drive his pickup onto the public right-of-way to preach which he says he has been able to do for years.

Instead, he sat on a step ladder to preach to the people.  Police asked him to come down and arrested him when he refused to comply.   Wallace told the cops they were violating his first amendment right.

On Tuesday, Wallace returned to the abortion clinic with his step ladder in tow.  When cops ordered him to stop preaching from the ladder, Wallace climbed into a nearby tree.

He had a big sign up in the tree which read, “Abortion exists because good people do nothing.”

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Pro-life protesters arrested in Birmingham allege civil rights violations

birmingham

Nine pro-life protesters arrested in Birmingham allege civil rights violations

.- Pro-life protesters who were arrested on a public sidewalk near a high school in Birmingham, Alabama on Thursday have accused police of violating their ‘basic civil rights.’

The Survivors Campus Life Tour said that nine protesting group members were standing on a public sidewalk near Parker High School distributing educational literature to passing students. Two of the group’s members held large signs and conversed with students on the public sidewalk.

According to the group, a campus officer called the police department when they refused to leave the area.

Over a dozen squad cars reportedly arrived at the school and the police officers began arresting members of the group.

Lahoci Franco, 24, one of the sign holders, was the first arrested. According to the group’s press release, protestor Rev. Henry “Bud” Shaver, 30, was told that the sidewalk was not public property for “non-citizens of Birmingham.”

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