Francis Cardinal George: … a mistake is not a cover up.

mistake

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

This January, as was announced a month ago in a press conference by a plaintiff’s lawyer, documents relating to the sexual misconduct of 30 priests of the archdiocese will be released as part of settlement agreements over the past years. All these incidents were reported over the years to the civil authorities and claims have been mediated civilly. Almost all of the incidents happened decades ago, perpetrated by priests whom neither I nor many younger clergy have ever met or talked to, because the priests were either dead or out of ministry before I came to Chicago as archbishop.

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Editor’s note: Shortly after things came to light, we had a chance to ask the Cardinal what happened in the Daniel McCormack affair.  It seems that Cardinal George was away at the Vatican when local  supervision of McCormack proved insufficient. Obviously, mistakes were made.

Cardinal Bernard Law retires

Vatican City, Nov 21, 2011 / 05:55 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Benedict accepted the resignation of Cardinal Bernard Law, former Archbishop of Boston, and appointed Spanish Archbishop Santos Abril y Castelló as the new archpriest of the Basilica of St. Mary Major.

Cardinal Law, who resigned in 2002 as Archbishop of Boston in the wake of the sex abuse scandal, turned 80 on Nov. 4.

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Jesus wasn’t female – so there are no female Catholic priests. Jesus wasn’t homosexual – so there are no … oops!

The Archdiocese of San Francisco has placed a Menlo Park pastor on leave for “a boundary violation” after he admitted to following a 17-year-old boy into a clothing store dressing room, prompting a police investigation.

Although police later determined no crime had been committed in the April 19 incident at a Ross Dress For Less store in San Francisco, archdiocesan officials told the press that Fr. William Myers, pastor of St. Raymond Church in Menlo Park since 2007, has been suspended while the archdiocese’s Independent Review Board considers the case.

Fr. Myers is also undergoing treatment for “sexual addiction,” archdiocesan officials said.

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Six important points you don’t hear about regarding clergy sexual abuse in the Catholic Church

There are a lot more myths than facts bantered around about clergy sexual abuse in the Catholic Church. Here are 6 important points that you should know if you are interested in this topic.

1. Catholic clergy aren’t more likely to abuse children than other clergy or men in general.

According to the best available data (which is pretty good mostly coming from a comprehensive report by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in 2004 as well as several other studies), 4% of Catholic priests in the USA sexually victimized minors during the past half century. No evidence has been published at this time that states that this number is higher than clergy from other religious traditions. The 4% figure is lower than school teachers (at 5%) during the same time frame and perhaps as much as half of the numbers of the general population of men. Research states that 17% of American women and 12% of American men were sexually violated when they were children by an adult. Sexual victimization is tragically fairly common in the general population but luckily these numbers have been dropping in recent years.

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Interesting historical perspective

False premise: Priestly abuse scandal is not (primarily) a homosexual problem.

This paper demonstrates that there is indeed a very strong link between male homosexuality and child sexual abuse. It also shows that there is a similar rate of child sexual abuse among other very large groups of adult males (e.g., Protestant clergy, who are usually married), thus proving that celibacy is not the root of the problem — homosexuality is.

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After child abuse accusations, Catholic priests often simply vanish

Although the vast majority were removed from ministry long ago – barred from celebrating Mass in public, administering the sacraments, wearing their clerical collars or presenting themselves as priests – church officials say they have no way to monitor where the men are now. Nor do they keep official data on how many were defrocked, or stripped of their priestly status; how many were imprisoned or placed on sex-offender lists; how many are working; and how many are dead.

The priests themselves have largely vanished from public view. Their fates are often a mystery to their victims, their parishioners and even their own lawyers.

Independently compiling data about what happened to the men is nearly impossible.

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Likely new USCCB head hails from Chicago (by way of Tucson) – brings lots of heavy baggage.

In a recent interview, Bishop Gerald Kicanas of the diocese of Tucson made some interesting comments that deserve public scrutiny. He discussed the upcoming November Presidential election, as well as the upcoming November United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ plenary meeting. It is clear the bishop confuses the already confused Catholic reader.

LifeSite.com recently wrote: “Bishop Gerald Kicanas is among that cadre of US bishops who is himself well liked in Democrat and liberal Catholic communities for his vocal support for left wing and “progressive” peace and justice issues. Bishop Kicanas was praised by the aggressively abortion-supporting Governor of Arizona, Janet Napolitano, for his ‘softer’ approach to pro-abortion politicians using Catholic venues to publicize their positions.”

In his interview, Bishop Kicanas speaks of the importance of voters considering the “vast array of issues” in voting. This is not correct. The right to life is the most basic and fundamental right and the condition for all other human rights. Let’s see what the late Pope John Paul II had to say about this question:

“The inviolability of the person, which is a reflection of the absolute inviolability of God, finds its primary and fundamental expression in the inviolability of human life. Above all, the common outcry, which is justly made on behalf of human rights — for example, the right to health, to home, to work, to family, to culture — is false and illusory if the right to life, the most basic and fundamental right and the condition for all other personal rights, is not defended with maximum determination” (Pope John Paul II, Post-synodal Apostolic Exhortation Christifideles laici, “On the Vocation and the Mission of the Lay Faithful in the Church and in the Modern World,” Dec. 30, 1988, No. 38b).

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