Revised Roman Missal: They should have put in just a bit of Latin.

by Doug Lawrence

By far the greatest difficulty with the newly revised Mass translation is remembering to say “And with your spirit” instead of “And also with you.”

The “old” response is so ingrained as to be virtually automatic, with probably half or more of the congregation routinely “flubbing it”.

Perhaps things will improve over time, but the elegant and traditional solution (and one that will really irritate the libs) is to go back to the Latin! (What’s the problem? The liturgy already retains certain phrases, in Greek.)

Dominus vobiscum. Et cum spiritu tuo.

(“The Lord be with you. And with your spirit.”)

Most of today’s Catholics have never heard it, so there should be absolutely no problem with prior conditioning or habit.

Note to surviving, pre-Vatican II Catholics: Please try to remember that “Et cum spiritu tuo”  is NOT the emergency phone number for the Vatican!

I got a chance to experience the new, Revised Roman Missal, at Sunday Mass. It was good!

by Doug Lawrence

I attended Mass at my old parish in Chicago yesterday. They had decided to start using the new, revised Roman Missal, so we had little cardboard fold-outs to help keep us apprised of all the new “parts”.

The priest had some new language to get used to, as well.

The toughest thing seemed to be remembering to say, “And with your spirit” rather than “And also with you”.

The youngsters had a bit of a hard time figuring out what the people were thricely doing with their hands, during the penitential rite. But they’re smart. They’ll “get it”.

Probably the easiest thing to get used to was listening to the revised language, which did indeed add new emphasis to many of the awesome yet sublime beliefs and principles of the authentic Catholic faith, many of which had recently been either blatantly disregarded or totally forgotten.

One other thing I noticed was the “little c” used for the word “catholic” in the Nicene Creed.

The word “consubstantial” is in the Creed now, referring to Jesus Christ, the incarnation, and the mystery of the Holy Trinity, where God is described as sharing one and the same eternal, uncreated, godly substance, among three distinct, rational, divine persons.   

There were a few other changes, but nothing problematic. The little, cardboard “cheat sheets” proved to be more than adequate.

All in all, it was a positive experience, and not really that much a “stretch” at all.

I liked it!

Read and/or print your own official “cheat sheet” (PDF)

After 45 years, the Spirit finally returns to the Mass


The prevailing opinion seems to be that the newly translated Missal will come into use in the United States beginning with the First Sunday of Advent 2011. Other commentators consider 2012 a bit more realistic, but regardless of when it is introduced for official use the intervening months must be treated as “an opportunity for catechesis; a time to prepare for the reception of the new translation,” according to the Holy Father.

With this in mind, I’d like to share a brief excerpt adapted from,  And with Your Spirit – Recovering a sense of the sacred in the English translation of the Roman Missal – 3rd Edition, a booklet that I prepared for pastors, DRE’s, catechists and any other Catholic interested in preparing themselves and others well for what’s to come.

Once the Mass begins, we won’t have to wait long to encounter our very first change in the text:

When the priest says, The Lord be with you, no longer will the people reply, And also with you, but rather by saying, And with your spirit.

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Submitted by Doria2