‘The Green-ethic’ – – an assault on human life and freedom

Christian anthropology holds as a starting point that God created man in his own image and likeness, that he endowed him with freedom and intelligence, and that he appointed him steward over the rest of physical creation. Being so constituted, human beings are able to know the difference between good and evil and to choose between them. The dignity of human beings lies in their ability to choose the good, and the institutions and laws of society should assist them in doing so. In consequence of this, the human person is the subject of inalienable human rights and corresponding duties. First among those rights is the right to life itself. This right to life of all innocent human beings must be guaranteed by law since it is inherent in the nature of the human person and not conferred by society.

Singer underpins his ethical system with an atheistic anthropology in which he asserts that there is no significant difference between human beings and animals. He asserts: “I don’t believe in the existence of God, so I also reject the idea that each human being is a creature of God. It’s as simple as that.

In line with this, he accuses “the Judaeo-Christian tradition” of having “an unjustifiable bias in favour of human beings qua human beings” (Peter Singer, Writings On An Ethical Life, London: Fourth Estate, 2000, p.320). He adds: “[T]he fact that animals are not members of our species is, in itself, no more morally relevant than the fact that a human being is not a member of my race or not a member of my sex” (ibid. p.326).

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Jungians, Neo-Pagans, New Agers and Feminists – and their unholy “sacrament” of abortion

The Sacrament of Abortion, written by Ginette Paris (Spring Publications, Dallas, 1992), proposes paganism (i.e. polytheism, witchcraft, earth worship, etc.) as a superior model for a society struggling with abortion issues.

In addition to providing an ecological relief valve for the misrepresentation of human population as the root of all evils, Paris adopts the Jungian models of mythology as universal archetypes for the evolving human consciousness, a common dogma among neo-pagans. Jung was a spiritualist who was fascinated with the occult. His ideas provide a multi-dimensional bridge between pagan mythology, psychology and atheistic existentialism, the outcome being the emergence of a universalist atheistic religion.

Having rejected the gospel message of the Bible, Paris reduces Christianity to a common mythology wherein the buyer can pick and choose according to the whims of the individual. But she doesn’t care to leave it at that, but campaigns for its demise, tooth and nail, also typical of paganism. How does this work alongside an obligation to accept everybody’s deity? Once the Godly influence of the Bible has been thrown out, then the selection for viable models becomes an act of moral relativism, subject to carnal proclivities and post-modernist fads such as the destructive anti-human doctrine of biocentrism.

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