Tyler Flowers, catcher for the Chicago White Sox: I love praying the Rosary.

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I love to pray rosaries, which are very Christ-centered. In fact, Jesus’ name is literally at the center of the Hail Mary. It’s been said that praying the rosary is learning about Jesus at the school of Mary.

When you consider what Jesus said about becoming like a little child in order to enter the kingdom of heaven, it’s easy to see the importance of placing ourselves at the feet of our spiritual mother, Mary.

Everyone knows it’s perfectly normal to see a child with his mother in the natural order, but the same is also true in the spiritual order: Children of God the Father need a mother, and they have one in Mary. When you become more devoted to Mary, you will inevitably become more devoted to Jesus in the Eucharist.

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Editor’s note: The Cubs could use a few guys like this.

By their fruits you will know them: In 92 years of life, “Stan the Man” Musial never let anyone down.

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Broadcaster Bob Costas, his voice cracking with emotion at times, pointed out during a two-hour Mass that in 92 years of life, Stan the Man never let anyone down.

Costas noted that even though Musial, who died Jan. 19, was a three-time NL MVP and seven-time batting champion, the pride of Donora, Pa., lacked a singular achievement. Joe DiMaggio had a 56-game hitting streak, Ted Williams was the last major leaguer to hit .400, and Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle soared to stardom in the New York spotlight. Musial didn’t quite reach the 500-homer club – he finished with 475 – and played in his final World Series in 1946, ”wouldn’t you know it, the year before they started televising the Fall Classic!”

”What was the hook with Stan Musial other than the distinctive stance and the role of one of baseball’s best hitters?” Costas said. ”It seems that all Stan had going for him was more than two decades of sustained excellence as a ballplayer and more than nine decades as a thoroughly decent human being.

”Where is the single person to truthfully say a bad word about him?”

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St. Rita – a secret baseball fan?

The way Willie Bloomquist sees it, he’s living an impossible dream. Of all the players who try to make it to the major leagues, only a relative few actually get there.

Bloomquist is one of those few, but he doesn’t attribute this to his own skills.

The 34-year-old Port Orchard, Wash., native says he’s not as talented as some other players who never made it to the majors. Why, then, is he there?

In part because of the intercession of St. Rita of Cascia, he says. After hitting a low point in the minor leagues, he began to ask for her prayers, and he made it through the often slow grind.

After playing nine full seasons in the majors, Bloomquist has a renewed appreciation for his Catholicism, family and opportunities to help others. He spoke with Register correspondent Trent Beattie prior to the beginning of the Arizona Diamondbacks’ regular season opener in early April.

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