What is the point of being a Christian?

Question: What’s the point of being a Christian? What makes Christianity the “true faith”?

Answer: The main point of being a Christian is to faithfully “align” ones self with Jesus Christ, in the hope of overcoming eternal death.

Christianity is the “true faith” because Jesus Christ is a real, historical person who actually proved he was God by his holy life, his miracles, his salvific death (precisely as prophesied, well in advance) and his glorious resurrection.

By his resurrection, Jesus Christ proved that he had overcome the power of death and only through faith in Christ are we able to maintain that blessed hope for ourselves, as well as our friends and loved ones.

Then, we have 2,000 years of continuous testimony to divine revelation and truth by the Catholic Church, which Jesus personally founded, authorized, empowered and perpetually guaranteed – a church which has miraculously withstood the scandals, abuses, shortcomings and general malfeasance of the heinous sinners who continue to lead, govern and belong to it.

No other faith tradition offers the slightest hope of overcoming eternal death, nor does any other faith tradition have the ability to provide the other very significant benefits of Christianity, because the best they can offer is some form of temporary happiness on earth, followed by an eternity separated from God.

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Seattle Seahawks tight end Luke Willson – practicing Catholic.

Have you always been able to connect your Catholic faith with sports?

My faith is a huge part of who I am today, and it always has been huge, ever since I was a child. My siblings and I were raised to believe what the Church teaches and to act in certain ways. Clear demarcation of right and wrong made decision-making pretty easy. That’s incredibly helpful for pursuing excellence in life, because you see what’s truly valuable and worth sacrificing for and also what you shouldn’t even bother to give attention to.

It’s an irreplaceable thing to be raised in the Catholic Church, where you have the teachings of Jesus passed down through the centuries. His goal is our eternal salvation, but even if you look only at the earthly benefits you get from being Catholic, they’re amazing. The peace of mind that comes from being in God’s will is awesome. I’m very grateful for the Catholic upbringing I had. Without it, I wouldn’t be anywhere near where I am today. Not even close.

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Submitted by Robert K.

Australian Catholics: Spain will greatly benefit from WYD in many unexpected ways.

Madrid, Spain, Aug 16, 2011 / 08:18 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- The Catholic Church in Spain will benefit greatly from this week’s World Youth Day – and in ways that can’t be imagined yet, say Australian Catholics who hosted the 2008 gathering in Sydney.

“God works in many and mysterious ways – but God is at work,” said Cardinal George Pell of Syndey, after attending a rally of over 4,000 Australian pilgrims in Madrid on August 16.

“One of things we’ve learned in Sydney is that so many spontaneous growths and activities have sprung up themselves since World Youth Day. We haven’t really organized them, but when you plant seeds in the hearts of people they germinate and flower in very different ways,” he told CNA.

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Why frequent reception of the Sacrament of Penance can work miracles.


Romans 6:14  For sin shall not have dominion over you:
for you are not under the law, but under grace.

Grace is the currency of Heaven … and it’s also the way God enables, empowers, and sanctifies those who love him.

Probably one of the most under-appreciated aspects of the Sacrament of Reconciliation is the fact that (like all sacraments) it infuses abundant grace into the soul.

How much grace?

For the sake of argument, let’s call it “enough to replace all that had been lost, through sin … plus a little more.”

What does this mean, for Catholics who are seriously pursuing personal holiness, conversion, and ultimate perfection in Jesus Christ?

Every time you make a good confession … no matter how grievously you might have offended God … you leave … absolved of all your sins … but also with (at least) a little more grace in your soul … than you ever had before.

Imagine what would happen,
if every time you went to the bank,
you left with more money in your account
than when you went in!

Scripture informs us that God has always empowered the weak and the infirm in this way:

2Corinthians 12:9  And he said to me:
My grace is sufficient for thee:
for power is made perfect in infirmity.
Gladly therefore will I glory in my infirmities,
that the power of Christ may dwell in me.

Regularly presenting ourselves before the Lord, through the Sacrament of Reconciliation, serves to empower us to overcome any and all of our human infirmities (spiritual weaknesses, and even physical illnesses) through the sufficiency of God’s abundant grace.

Accepting this fact and acting on it (in humility and faith) not only keeps the forces of the world, the flesh, and the devil under control … but it is a sure and certain way to please God … since it also keeps us perfectly centered in his will … and his plan.

It doesn’t get any better than that, this side of Heaven!

Based on all of this, how often should a Catholic go to confession? Probably a lot more often than we do!

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Corporate president explains, “Why I’m Not Hiring.”

Meet Sally (not her real name; details changed to preserve privacy).

Sally is a terrific employee, and she happens to be the median person in terms of base pay among the 83 people at my little company in New Jersey, where we provide audio systems for use in educational, commercial and industrial settings.

She’s been with us for over 15 years. She’s a high school graduate with some specialized training.

She makes $59,000 a year—on paper. In reality, she makes only $44,000 a year because $15,000 is taken from her thanks to various deductions and taxes, all of which form the steep, sad slope between gross and net pay.

Read more. (It gets pretty ugly!)

Waiting to Clamp the Umbilical Cord May Be Better for Babies

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) — Pregnant women may want to consider asking their doctors to hold off on clamping the umbilical cord for a few minutes after the baby is born, a new study suggests.

Clamping the cord in the seconds after birth cuts off the blood flow from mom to baby. While not necessarily harmful, the common practice in delivery rooms potentially robs newborns of those last precious minutes of cord blood, the researchers said, and cord blood contains stem cells that have regenerative properties and can grow into different types of cells.

Research suggests there may be some benefits to getting that extra blood from mom right after birth, said senior study author Dr. Paul Sanberg, director of the University of South Florida’s Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair.

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