US bishops elect NYC Archbishop Timothy Dolan as leader in upset

(AP) – 5 hours ago

BALTIMORE (AP) — New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan was elected Tuesday to be president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in an upset victory over an Arizona bishop with a moderate style who is the sitting vice president.

It is the first time since the 1960s that a sitting vice president was on the ballot for conference president and lost. The outcome is the latest sign that the American bishops — divided over how best to uphold Roman Catholic orthodoxy — favor a more aggressive approach.

Dolan received 54 percent of the vote to 46 percent for Bishop Gerald Kicanas of Tucson, Ariz., on the third round of balloting. Kicanas has served as vice president for the last three years. Dolan said he shook hands with Kicanas after the vote and thanked him for his service. At a news conference, Dolan said he was surprised by the vote and noted it was “hardly a landslide.” Kicanas issued a short statement saying he respected the choice of his fellow bishops and praised Dolan for his “exceptional leadership qualities.”

Archbishop Dolan Chided Biden, Pelosi on Abortion

Likely new USCCB head hails from Chicago (by way of Tucson) – brings lots of heavy baggage.

In a recent interview, Bishop Gerald Kicanas of the diocese of Tucson made some interesting comments that deserve public scrutiny. He discussed the upcoming November Presidential election, as well as the upcoming November United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ plenary meeting. It is clear the bishop confuses the already confused Catholic reader.

LifeSite.com recently wrote: “Bishop Gerald Kicanas is among that cadre of US bishops who is himself well liked in Democrat and liberal Catholic communities for his vocal support for left wing and “progressive” peace and justice issues. Bishop Kicanas was praised by the aggressively abortion-supporting Governor of Arizona, Janet Napolitano, for his ‘softer’ approach to pro-abortion politicians using Catholic venues to publicize their positions.”

In his interview, Bishop Kicanas speaks of the importance of voters considering the “vast array of issues” in voting. This is not correct. The right to life is the most basic and fundamental right and the condition for all other human rights. Let’s see what the late Pope John Paul II had to say about this question:

“The inviolability of the person, which is a reflection of the absolute inviolability of God, finds its primary and fundamental expression in the inviolability of human life. Above all, the common outcry, which is justly made on behalf of human rights — for example, the right to health, to home, to work, to family, to culture — is false and illusory if the right to life, the most basic and fundamental right and the condition for all other personal rights, is not defended with maximum determination” (Pope John Paul II, Post-synodal Apostolic Exhortation Christifideles laici, “On the Vocation and the Mission of the Lay Faithful in the Church and in the Modern World,” Dec. 30, 1988, No. 38b).

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