The pope is the servant of the Truth, not its maker.

“Never criticise the pope” has never been a Catholic rule. Ever.

There has also never been a rule that says, “Only saints can criticise popes”. Nor has there ever been any rule that says you can’t criticise a pope on the internet or other public forums.

All that stuff is in fact made up. And pretty recently. Mostly since we started feeling, in the early 1980s, with more and more bishops going weird and wiggy on us, that the pope was the last bastion of sanity in a world gone pazzo. But the history of the Church is longer than the last 40 years.

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Catholic Canon 212 Alert: Respectfully demand “No Sainthood for Pope John XXIII.”

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Canon 212.3 states: “According to the knowledge, competence, and prestige which they possess, [the faithful] have the right and even the duty to manifest to the sacred pastors their opinion on matters which pertain to the good of the Church and to make their opinion known to the rest of the Christian faithful, without prejudice to the integrity of the faith and morals, with reverence toward their pastors, and attentive to common advantage and the dignity of persons.”

Contact the Pope

Pope Francis has no public email address. The Pope’s regular mailing address is:

His Holiness, Pope Francis
Apostolic Palace
00120 Vatican City

Ask Pope Francis to cancel his plans for the canonization of Pope John XXIII. If the Pope can happily accede to the wishes of “the Jews” – delaying the cause for sainthood of Pope Pius XII – there’s absolutely no reason he can’t honor the wishes of a few million faithful Catholics, regarding Pope John XXIII – who was apparently unable to understand the meaning of the common phrase, “If it ain’t broke – don’t fix it!” (Italian: “Se non è rotto – non aggiustarlo!”) (Latin: “Si fractum non sit – noli id ​​reficere.”) 

This Week’s Ask Alice: Catholic Church Critics, Michael Voris and Real Catholic TV.



Send A Question To Alice

She’ll answer as many questions as possible,
right here, every Thursday.

Email responses will also be provided, as time permits.

Andy Asks: I liked the recent Ask Alice answer about websites critical of the Catholic Church and I was wondering what you both thought of the Michael Voris Real Catholic TV site. His videos are tough on the Bishops but he sure loves our Holy Father.

Alice Responds: Michael Voris’ Real Catholic TV reaches the minds and hearts of an enormous online audience. You refer to his videos as “tough” while I call them “truthful.” And sometimes, the truth does hurt.

Although he is tough on errant bishops, Voris is equally outspoken about any bishop, priest, religious, or lay person who does not teach, practice, uphold and defend the Catholic faith. Michael is a man who loves God and speaks the truth.

“God is Spirit, and those who worship
must worship in Spirit and truth.”
(John 4:24)

The main reason I respect Michael is because as you said, “he sure loves our Holy Father.” Michael is faithful to the Pope, i.e., the Magisterium of our Church. His Real Catholic TV programs teach about Heaven and hell, Jesus and Mary, saints and sinners, angels and demons, good and evil.

Voris urges Catholics to receive the sacraments of Penance and Holy Eucharist frequently. Voris’ criticisms are not leveled against the Catholic Church, but chastise individuals whose bad behavior provides a disservice to the Body of Christ.

Sometimes, there is a razor fine line between constructive and destructive criticism of human beings who serve in church ministry.

Although Voris is often critical of misdeeds done by members of the clergy, he does not engage in calumny or character defamation. He doesn’t spread rumors or half-truths. Also, Voris speaks messages of support and encouragement to bishops, priests, religious, and laity who are faithful to the Church.

Here is my personal set of rubrics
for determining the efficacy of a Catholic commentator:

1) Does the Catholic commentator acknowledge the Pope as the head of the Church, the Vicar of Christ on Earth and believe in Papal infallibility? Does the commentator respect or malign our Holy Father?

2) Does the commentator uphold the teachings of the Catholic faith?

3) Is the criticism presented by the commentator aligned with the Mind of Christ?

“You must be clever as snakes and innocent as doves.” (Matthew 10:16)

4) Does the commentator exhibit a spirit of love and forgiveness? Or is he/she judgmental?

“If you want to avoid judgment,
stop passing judgment. Your verdict on others
will be the verdict passed on you.”
(Matthew 7:1-2)

5) Do the words of the commentator unite or divide the Body of Christ? Commentators who are negative and judgmental fail to nurture the Body of Christ. They spread paranoia and mistrust rather than the “be not afraid” attitude Jesus promoted.

A faithful Catholic commentator leads his/her listeners to Christ.

“You will know them by their deeds….you can tell a tree by its fruit.” (Matthew 7:16, 20)

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

Doug Lawrence adds: It’s interesting that you mention Michael Voris, since neither Alice or I rate Real Catholic TV as a “dangerous” site. Respectfully critical perhaps … but certainly not outside the bounds of Canon 212 … and always faithful to the Magisterium.

We also have a link to Real Catholic TV on our site. (Depending on your screen resolution, links appear alphabetically, either to the right of, or just below the main content window.)

As you probably know, during the last six months we’ve sponsored and promoted two different personal appearances by Michael Voris, in the Chicago area. The last one was an all-day “Majesty of the Faith” program, and it was great!

You really ought to see/hear him in person, if you get the chance.

Of course, certain Catholic bishops and/or their diocesan staff members have been known to have opinions to the contrary … but there’s not too much we can do about that.

More about Michael Voris and Real Catholic TV

Click here to see all of Alice’s other columns

Remnant Catholic Newspaper: No blessed or sainted Pope in Church history has a legacy as troubling as that of John Paul II.

The impending beatification of Pope John Paul II on May 1, 2011 has aroused serious concern among not a few Catholics around the world, who are concerned about the condition of the Church and the scandals that have afflicted her in recent years—scandals that prompted the future Benedict XVI to exclaim on Good Friday 2005: “How much filth there is in the Church, even among those who, in the priesthood, should belong entirely to Him.” We give voice to our own concern in this public way in keeping with the law of the Church, which provides:

In accord with the knowledge, competence and preeminence which they possess, the Christian faithful have the right and even at times a duty to manifest to the sacred pastors their opinion on matters which pertain to the good of the Church, and they have a right to make their opinion known to the other Christian faithful, with due regard for the integrity of faith and morals and reverence towards their pastors, and with consideration for the common good and the dignity of persons. [CIC (1983), Can. 212, § 3.]

We are compelled by what we believe in conscience to be the common good of the Church to express our reservations concerning this beatification. We do so on the following grounds, among others that could be brought forth.

(Thanks to Matt C. Abbott)

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