Scandalous prophecy come true: “Someone else will end up owning the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.”

bishop

About this story

This series is based on nearly 23,000 pages of internal documents from the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and various religious orders that were made public this year in compliance with court orders. In addition, (LA) Times reporters reviewed thousands of pages of depositions and court filings and interviewed dozens of people, including church officials, victims’ families and law enforcement officials. Cardinal Roger Mahony declined to be interviewed or respond to questions sent to his attorney.

Unless otherwise stated, and excepting historical and biographical information from Times archives, all information in the story is based on internal church records released through court order or sworn depositions. Statements that appear within quotation marks are from depositions, church records, public statements, interviews and contemporaneous coverage in the Los Angeles Times. Some comments and conversations have been paraphrased based on the recollections of participants; in those instances, quotation marks are not used.

Text, photographs – and many ugly details

Editor’s note: An estimated $2.6 billion (probably much more) has so far, been spent by the Catholic Church on legal defense and damage awards, throughout the United States.

The scope of the problem is so widespread, that when similar problems occur in non-Catholic religious groups, they look to see how much the Catholic Church paid out.

The “going rate” for a typical settlement now stands at around $2.5 million per person/per case.

Curiously, when similar issues crop up in public schools, teachers still get transferred around and awards for money damages rarely follow. But even when they do, things are usually covered up and the dollar amounts are much, much smaller. So, there is one standard that applies to Catholics and another standard, for everyone else.

The whole thing stinks, to the high heavens!

Priest offers positive, common sense definition (and defense) of celibacy

Fr. McBride said that the real reason for sex abuse and sexual misconduct by priests is not celibacy but “the failure to practice the virtue of chastity when faced with temptations to abandon their vow of celibacy.”

He noted that people often make the unfortunate mistake of defining celibacy in a negative way as if it’s simply the act of giving up marriage and and children.

However, “the positive view of celibacy,” he said,  “is that it is a form of loving God and people with an undivided heart.”

“Celibacy did not block Blessed John Paul II from being admired as one of the most courageous priests on earth,” Fr. McBride underscored. “See how one celibate priest stood up against one of the most corrupt governments of his time.”

“Priests that abused children did not do so because of their celibacy, rather they failed because they broke their vow to be chaste,” he said.

Read more at Father Z’s

Clohessy still painting Father Corapi and all priests with the same, dirty brush.

David Clohessy, director of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, said in a press release that “We’ve long been skeptical of these sort of ‘freelance’ traveling priests who seem to foster a cult of personality.”

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Editor’s note: Please Mr. Cohessy … tell us exactly who “we” is!

Report details the increasing violence against priests in Mexico

Mexico City (Agenzia Fides) – Last year more than one thousand priests were victims of attempted extortions (for their “protection”, amounts ranging from ten thousand to two million Mexican pesos have been demanded).

About 162 were threatened with death. Two priests were kidnapped and killed.

In the last six years, the most violent of all time, 12 men religious were killed. According to an analysis by Catholic Media Centre (CMC), criminals are seeking money in exchange for protection, while pastors are being threatened with arson against their churches.

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Four Modern Day Martyrs, But Only Three To Be Beatified By the Church

Soon-to-be beatified priests, along with fellow martyred Lutheran pastor, were ‘shining lights on our common ecumenical path.’

LUBECK, Germany (CNS) — As the Nazi executioner beheaded three Catholic priests and a Lutheran pastor, one after another in a matter of minutes, their blood flowed together, creating a powerful symbol for ecumenism in northern Germany.

On June 25, the three Catholic martyrs of Lubeck — Fathers Johannes Prassek, Eduard Muller and Hermann Lange — will be beatified in the historic city’s Sacred Heart Church, a stone’s throw away from the Lubeck Cathedral, the ministerial home of the Rev. Karl Friedrich Stellbrink, their Lutheran counterpart. Rev. Stellbrink will be honored in a special way that day as well.

The four were executed in Hamburg Nov. 10, 1943. All had been found guilty of disseminating anti-Nazi material — such as the homilies of Cardinal Clemens von Galen of Munster — and other “treasonous” activities.

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Seen on the web: “Painting all priests as child abusers is not comedy. It is bigotry.”


“Painting all priests as child abusers is not comedy. It is bigotry.”

-The Catholic League’s Bill Donohue, writing about Jay Leno’s cheap shot at Catholic priests, on a recent “Tonight Show”.

Book Selection: Goodbye, good men: how liberals brought corruption into the Catholic Church – By Michael S. Rose


Read it at Google Books