If you know what “lavatory” means then you already know where this is going!

By Matt C. Abbott

As National Catholic Sisters Week (March 8–14) comes to a close, I offer the following short memoir, written by Kenneth M. Weinig for the current issue of The Remnant Catholic newspaper. Thanks to Michael J. Matt, editor of The Remnant, for giving me permission to publish Mr. Weinig’s touching story in this column. Click here to visit the newspaper’s website.

Thank you, Sister Mary St. Roger!

By Kenneth M. Weinig

My first grade in public school had been rather boring, but I loved the weekly Catechism classes in my parish conducted by a smiling nun who put colored stars next to every question in the Baltimore Catechism I got right, which were many, thanks to the motivation by my Catholic grandmother, who lived with us, and by my Protestant mother, too. Wouldn’t it be wonderful, I had thought, to have such a wonderful teacher like this every day!

In September of 1950, my wish came true: I was overjoyed to enter the second grade at Our Lady of Loreto School in Hempstead, N.Y. My teacher was Sister Mary St. Roger, a cautious smiler. An early reader – thanks also to my mother – I expected to be placed in the Bluebirds, the highest group, but I was disappointed to be seated with the Robins. Oh, well, at least I wasn’t with the dumb Canaries. Later, I learned that mom had conferred with Sister, and they had agreed to give me a conservative placement, since I had come from a public school; better to promote than demote. Soon, I proved worthy of Bluebird membership but was glad they didn’t group for mathematics! As I write this, I am looking up at a shelf on which sits a small, blue ceramic lamb, given to me by Sister for winning a class spelling bee.

Text and photos

Editor’s note: A Catholic school system without these dedicated sisters and the Catholic culture they lived, breathed and constantly promoted, by their every word and deed, is just another private school with a religious ed curriculum “tacked -on”.

It’s also important to note that many of the teaching sisters routinely managed class sizes of fifty children or more.

The pre-Vatican II Catholic school system was a constantly visible, beautiful sign of God’s grace, in action. As such, it fit in very well with the Catholic parishes of the time.

Of course, it wasn’t perfect. But it was close!

Other Self-Absorbed Promethean Neopelagians seem to agree!  What say you?

Congressmen Edward Markey and Michael Capuano nixed by local bishop due to their pro abortion voting records

Pope John XXIII High School has had to cancel its largest and most prestigious fund-raising program of the year because the two congressmen, who were to be honored at the affair, support public positions that in the eyes of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops are “inconsistent with church doctrine”.

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Editor’s note: Forget the dis-invitations and let’s begin the excommunications!

Iowa homosexuals go too far, Bishop says “no”.

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Overruling school officials, a Catholic bishop in Iowa said Monday he would not let a group that promotes equal rights for gays and lesbians present a college scholarship to an openly gay student during an upcoming award ceremony.

Bishop Martin Amos in Davenport said the Eychaner Foundation would not be allowed to present the Matthew Shepard Scholarship to Keaton Fuller during the May 20 ceremony at Prince of Peace Catholic School in Clinton, saying the group’s support for gay rights conflicts with church doctrine.

Link

Editor’s note: Thank God for good bishops! The school officials ought to be fired. Maybe VP Joe Biden can set up something special for the sodomites and their charitable foundation.

Baltimore Catholic School to dedicate new Bill and Camille Cosby Community Center.

A historic Baltimore Catholic school will name its community center in honor of Bill and Camille Cosby, the biggest donors in the school’s 184-year history and fierce champions of education, the school announced Friday.

St. Frances Academy, which serves 162 primarily low-income high school students, will host the comedian, his wife and their relatives in a ceremony at the St. Frances Community Center on April 20.

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What happens when a Jewish mom sends her daughter to a Catholic school?

“So what did you have for lunch today?” I asked my daughter the other day. She has started a new school this year, one that provides lunches and snacks.

“I made myself a ham sandwich,” she answered proudly. “I love ham.”

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Advanced mathematics: Common denominator between Catholic students and Muslim teacher.

Khadija Ali, a Muslim,  is a math teacher at Holy Family Cathedral School.

In 2002, when she interviewed for the job at Holy Family, Ali came qualified. She had 26 years of experience, and had been nominated Teacher of the Year in her previous job, at John Muir Middle School in Los Angeles.

Principal Harlow says Ali was exactly what she was looking for.

But she also knew Sept. 11 was still fresh on the minds of every American, and that she had to consider the possibility that some parents wouldn’t like the idea of entrusting the best minds at the school to a Muslim teacher.

“I had some concerns,” Harlow says.

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“In 1997 I co-founded and con-celebrated a feminist inclusive Eucharist with 12 other women and hundreds of witnesses …”

Students at a Catholic prep school for girls in San Francisco were encouraged to view parts of a film sympathetic to the ordination of women and a ‘womanpriest’ was invited to discuss it with students, the campus newspaper reported earlier this month.

Victoria Rue is also an open lesbian and homosexual activist. “In 1990 my partner Kathryn Poethig and I celebrated a ceremony of commitment with our families and friends,” says her website. “…Through the years we have worked for a more body positive theology, as well as the inclusion and ordination of lesbian and gay people in both the Protestant and Catholic churches.”

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Judy Masterson really did attend Catholic school!

While my kids have been raised decidedly public, with sacraments on the side, I was raised decidedly, full-throttled Catholic, with separate playgrounds for girls and boys, and where recess came to a halt at noon for the sign of the cross and the reciting of the Angelus.

It was different back then. A factory worker and his stay-at-home wife could afford to send their kids to Catholic school because free labor from nuns or, or as I recently overheard a priest call them, “nunsies,” made it affordable.

Ah, the nuns. What shining examples of Christian virtue. I really mean it. I have no evil nuns who abused me, mocked me, made me hate the Catholic church stories like some of my contemporaries love to share. My nuns were wonderful.

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News of Catholic school closing was met with a totally unexpected response

Multiple parishioners approached Donoghue and Father Stack, arguing that what the parish needed was a more rigorous curriculum and authentic Catholic spirit. One of the loudest of these voices was that of Michael Hanby, a professor at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family. Hanby had lately been introduced to a local homeschooling community’s miniature school, known as the Crittenden Academy, which had inspired him to write an essay describing his philosophy on the subject. That November evening, attending the consultation and listening to the parish’s presentation, he recalls thinking, “I’m not sure that the school they just described is really worth saving.”

Following the meeting, Hanby sent a letter saying as much to Father Stack, including a copy of his essay on education and emphasizing that “a wonderful birthright [was] being denied” the children of the community. Students needed, he argued, “to love thinking and to have something noble to think about,” but Catholic schools had instead “drifted toward a public school model.” His essay, Donoghue recalls, presented “a good analysis of where Catholic education had gotten off track,” and she was impressed with its proposed remedies.

What was most amazing, though, was that it was a “beautiful fit” with a change she and Father Stack had already been contemplating since they’d attended a leadership consortium two weeks before the call from downtown: a school where rigorous curriculum was combined with authentic Catholicism without apology. “It was already clear,” Donoghue explains, “that [the old] model had run out of steam.” Hanby’s vision for education — along with other essays they read, including Dorothy Sayers’ “Lost Tools of Learning” — articulated a methodology for their goals “more fully and more completely” than she and Father Stack could do themselves.

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Idiot teacher “comes out” as an atheist, wonders why she was fired from teaching job at Catholic school.

Nurre said she was called into the principal’s office just before winter break and asked about Atheist Nexus, a social network that bills itself as site for “nontheists.”

She said she registered on the site on her personal computer at home. She noted a New York Times‘ article reporting the government had spent $2.3 million on prayer research since 2000 and added the link.

“I never thought something like that would jeopardize my job,” she said Friday from Phoenix, Ariz., where she was applying for teaching jobs.

Nurre was suspended by Monsignor Kevin McCoy and later fired by the school board for violating a policy that prohibits employees from advocating “principles contrary” to the teachings of the church.

St. Edmonds took the “appropriate action,” Kristie Arlt, spokeswoman for the Sioux City Diocese, said of the math teacher.

“The main thing is that she stated she didn’t believe in God,” Arlt said. “It’s pretty hard to put that same teacher in front of students in a Catholic school system.”

Nurre said her views constantly evolve and that she is constantly trying to expand her knowledge, whether on religion, astrology, fitness or politics.

“I just like learning about it. I don’t see why that should cause someone to get fired,” she said.

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Catholic school teacher acquitted of assaulting errant student with dumbbell

CCTV footage of pupils’ reactions to the moment that their teacher struck a boy with a dumbbell was released by prosecutors yesterday.

Schoolchildren in blazers and ties are seen rushing from their class to watch Peter Harvey, unseen on camera, attacking the 14-year-old boy. They then retreat and a dumbbell is flung through the doorway. An agitated Harvey leaves the room and hovers in the corridor before several other adults come into view.

The footage, captured by a camera at All Saints’ Roman Catholic School, in Mansfield, last July, formed part of the evidence at Harvey’s trial for attempted murder and grievous bodily harm at Nottingham Crown Court this week. During the trial, Harvey was described as a man possessed at this point in the attack. He was shouting “die, die, die”, witnesses said.

The boy, described during the trial as a “leading light” when it came to causing trouble, had earlier been sword-fighting with a wooden metre rule and playing volleyball with scrunched-up bits of paper. Then, when Harvey tried to wrestle a bunsen burner stand from him, he told his teacher to “f*** off”, an act that “lit the blue touch paper”.

On Thursday, a jury took just an hour to clear Harvey on both counts after accepting his barrister’s claim that he was not thinking rationally so could have had no intention of seriously harming or killing the boy. Witnesses testified to his good character during a 25-year career.

(Editor’s note: There’s obviously nothing like Traditional Catholic education to keep kids in line!)

Catechists offended by photo of President Barack Obama in Catholic classroom

Precisely where does education stop and partisan politicking begin?

Is it appropriate to have a photo of President Barack Obama, the most anti-life, pro abortion, and (arguably) anti-Catholic president of all time, prominently displayed in an individual classroom of a Catholic school, without some sort of qualification or disclaimer?

What does such a display say about the teacher, the principle, the school, the pastor and the parish?

What message does it send to the students?

I can lend a bit of insight into this issue, since I had the opportunity to substitute-teach in that classroom, not too long ago.

I did my best to simply ignore the display, which I personally found to be offensive, but what really shocked me was the response I got when I asked the kids to name some people they considered to be heroically Christ-like.

A little hand went up, and of course, the first candidate for sainthood turned out to be Barack Obama, the abortion president! Stifling the urge to throw up, I bravely carried on. Next!

I know that complaints about the picture have been made to the teacher, the school principal, the diocese, the provincial of the religious order, and even the bishop … but so far, nothing  at all has been done.

Maybe we need a week or two of picketing out in front of the school, just to make sure that the kids get a fair and balanced view of things. Leafleting the parking lot and/or financial sanctions might work, too.

If we can’t get that Obama picture to come down, the least we can do is demand a disclaimer of some sort … perhaps written in the blood of aborted babies. Alternatively, we might simply “throw in the towel” and give all the kids Notre Dame scholarships.

Paraphrasing the words of President Ronald Reagan (who wasn’t very pro-life either, but who was as ideologically different from Barack Obama  as anyone ever could be, “Mrs. W … tear down that picture!”

Until then, we pray. (Send me an email if you want more information.)