No religious liberty in China for Roman Catholics. Only persecution. Bishop’s mourners turn out anyway.

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Shanghai (AFP) – Thousands of mourners packed a Shanghai square Saturday to bid farewell to “underground” Catholic Bishop Joseph Fan Zhongliang, whose faith led him to endure decades of suffering at the hands of China’s ruling Communist Party, they said.

Fan, who was imprisoned for much of the last two decades and spent his final years under house arrest, died last Sunday at the age of 97 after several days of high fever, according to the US-based Cardinal Kung Foundation, a Roman Catholic organisation.

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China’s officially atheistic Communist Party wants not only the right to approve Catholic bishops, but also to fire those who get out of line.

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BEIJING (AP) — In a fresh challenge to Vatican authority, China has revoked the title of a new Catholic bishop in Shanghai who outraged Chinese officials by immediately dropping out of the government agency that oversees the country’s officially sanctioned church, religious officials said Wednesday.

Ma Daqin, who was jointly named for the post in a rare consensus between Beijing and the Vatican, has been confined to a seminary since he announced his intention to drop out of the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association in front of a congregation during his July 7 ordination as auxiliary bishop.

The move by Ma, 44, was seen as challenging China’s attempts to run the country’s Catholic church independently of the Vatican.

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Courageous Chinese Catholic Bishop refuses to “play ball” with Chi-comms.

BEIJING — A newly ordained Chinese bishop has been placed in isolation after announcing he’s quitting his government posts in a challenge to Beijing’s control over the Catholic clergy, a Hong Kong church activist and Catholic websites said Tuesday.

Shanghai’s auxiliary Bishop Ma Daqin was taken away shortly after announcing his resignation toward the end of his ordination Mass on Saturday, Holy Spirit Study Center researcher Anthony Lam said.

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Crime against humanity: Chinese government thugs forcibly abort a child at 7 months.

Chinese and American human rights groups exposed how the woman, Feng Jianmei, was beaten and dragged into a vehicle by a group of family planning officials while her husband, Deng Jiyuan, was out working. The officials asked for RMB 40,000 in fines from Feng Jianmei’s family and, when they did not receive the money, they forcibly aborted Feng at seven months, laying the body of her aborted baby next to her in the bed (pictured).

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The latest incident in continuing horror saga of Chinese ‘family planning officials’.

Chinese woman beaten, then has baby forcibly aborted

Surprising and little known facts about Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng and his position on abortion

In reality, the portrayal of Chen as a pro-life activist is misguided. Chen has never protested against abortion on principle. What Chen has spent years fighting against is forced abortion by village officials on local women in rural China, which is actually against Chinese law. During Chen’s two major public appearances since arriving in the U.S., he has not mentioned abortion at all, instead focusing his attention on promoting the “rule of law” in China. His friend, Bob Fu, a Chinese-born Christian who is the head of China Aid (a Texas-based non-profit working towards religious freedom in China), has written that if abortion is not forced, then Chen is “not necessarily against it.”

Rights activist Chen opposes forced abortion, but not abortion on principle

In fact, the evidence suggests that Chen wants to use Chinese law to protect pregnant women from being forced into abortions by local officials under the pressure of China’s One-Child Policy. Forced abortion and abortion are two entirely different topics—just as people can abhor rape (i.e., forced sex) but not sex, someone like Chen who opposes forced abortion is not necessarily against abortion in all its forms.

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The Club of Rome: The analyses and models behind China’s population control came from the West.

The analyses and models behind China’s population control in its early days came from the West. They were inspired by the reports of the Club of Rome, a think tank that unites Heads of States, UN bureaucrats, diplomats, scientists and business leaders who claim they “share a common concern for the future of humanity and the planet.”

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