Nasty church politics and intrigue in liberal Germany

One might think we were living back in the days of the Renaissance.

Tremendously high expenses for “luxurious” buildings by the Bishop of Limburg have brought him into the headlines as the “Protz-Bischof” (“the showy Bishop”). Scandal has rocked the diocese and Rome decided therefore in October 2013 that bishop Tebartz-van Elst was to take some time out, while a committee investigated the matter. He has retired to the Bavarian monastery of Metten, while awaiting a final decision.

Given the reaction of the press, of the diocese and the general public outcry, one might have thought he had done something far more serious. In reality, this affair is really about something quite different than a project that went over budget.

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Being authentically Catholic can be complicated

keeprightwrongThe Catholic vision of life permeates everything. Thus, it shapes the way I view sexuality – as a great gift from God but also with certain boundaries and limits – but also the way I view how we should build our towns and cities and care for the environment, raise our animals, cultivate our food. The Catholic principle of subsidiarity – mentioned earlier – causes me to be distrustful of big government – where it isn’t warranted – but also of big corporations.

None of this fits into our neat political categories. And it leads to quite a bit of misunderstanding from those on the outside.

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Veiled message to traditional Catholics: Hurry up and die so we elitists can get on with the revolution in the Church.

There is a sense something happened in 1962 that was not an organic growth, or a representation of a Church that is always young, always renewing herself, always beautiful, Mulhall said. Some have characterized Vatican II as something akin to the 1917 revolution in Russia, a distinct break with the past leading to the Bolshevik takeover. The change seemed to have an abruptness to it, that it created something new out of nothing, he said.

This before-and-after dynamic has some people seeing “before the Council” as good and after the Council as bad, and others who see the reverse, he said.

The Church has been living this tension for the past 50 years.

“The day is going to arrive when no one remembers the days before the Council,” he said. Then it will be perceived as part of the natural growth of the Church.

“It was an age of great difficulty and confusion for some,” he said. The Church faced “a perfect storm” in the societal changes of the 1960s. But soon people will no longer be looking back only 50 years but 2,000 years, especially for those invited to live the life of a priest.

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Editor’s note: “…part of the natural growth of the Church.”What growth?

Why are we surprised? Christian university retaliates against pro-life student for showing graphic reality of abortion.

“The hypocrisy I’ve seen is also disappointing,” lamented Diana. “When I told Dr. Elliott the punishment was inappropriate, she said I should have thought about that before. Seriously? I’m trying to save lives, and this is what she does?”

Diana has since written a letter to the Biola administration and nursing department faculty explaining her motivation for showing the reality of abortion.

“Most people on this campus would say they’re pro-life, but they don’t have a strong enough conviction to do anything about it,” said Diana. “You can say you’re a Christian all day long, but where’s the evidence? We are challenged at Biola to say what we believe and what are we going to do about it.

“Four months ago I didn’t know anything about the issue,” Diana concluded. “These last four months have changed my life forever. I can’t believe we’re doing absolutely nothing for these babies or the women.”

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Belloc: The origins of that great movement which shook and split for generations the spiritual world, and which we call the “Reformation”.

The most important thing about the Reformation is to understand it. Not only to follow the story of it stage by stage – a process always necessary to the understanding of any historical matter – but to grasp its essential nature.

On this last it is easy for modern people to go wrong, and especially modern people of the English-speaking world. The nations we English-speaking people know are, with the exception of Ireland, predominantly Protestant; and yet (with the exception of Great Britain and South Africa) they harbour large Catholic minorities.

In that English-speaking world (to which this present writing is addressed) there is full consciousness of what the Protestant spirit has been and what it has become in its present modification.

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Topical and Timely New Book – Not Peace but a Sword: The Great Chasm Between Christianity and Islam By Robert Spencer

IslamMoon

Robert Spencer has written a dozen books on Islam, as well as thousands of pages of commentary on Islamic law, scripture, and tradition, but this may be his most significant book yet because of its potential to alert Christians to a dangerous gap in their knowledge of Islam. Christian leaders are badly in need of a wake-up call about Islam and this is a wake-up call that is hard to ignore. Not Peace but a Sword asks questions about the relationship between Christianity and Islam that few others are asking, even though they are questions that beg for answers.

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The Great and Enduring Heresy of Mohammed (Free Selection)

Pope confirms need for reform of CINO (Catholic In Name Only) Leadership Conference of Women Religious.

The Vatican last year imposed an overhaul of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious after determining the sisters took positions that undermined Catholic teaching on the priesthood and homosexuality while promoting “radical feminist themes incompatible with the Catholic faith.” Investigators praised the nuns’ humanitarian work, but accused them of ignoring critical issues, including fighting abortion.

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Editor’s note: This is a “no-brainer”. The LCWR sisters have, for a long time, publicly bragged about their radical feminist agenda and “post-Christianity” philosophy … not to mention their modernist, secular, new-age pagan slant on many, many things. This is all common knowledge. What is being contended is what happens next.