In case you didn’t know: In a nutshell, the Church—Catholicism—is this…

The universal dimension of the People of God must never be forgotten. Regardless of the nation of which one is a member, the universality “which adorns the people of God” exists to bring all members of the human family back to its source and head who is Christ. (N. 13) This fact demonstrates the “catholicity” of the Church. This universality consists of different ranks based either on the duties of individuals such as “sacred ministry” or on one’s condition and state of life such as family or religious life.

Another important point about the “particular Churches” is that while they may have their own traditions, they must not oppose the primacy of the Chair of Peter. (N. 13) This is something which critics of the “hierarchy” must consider. The pope has a crucial role that must be exercised in the Church’s true nature.

The Church, through all of its members, has been given the responsibility to go out to the world and preach the Good News. (N. 17) In doing so, she must assist those who may otherwise be prone to falling into doctrinal error. This is a problem with and for the LCWR. However, these are the obligations of every disciple who follows Christ. (N. 17) Here the Council Fathers saw need to explicate the specific duties of the various members of the Church taking stock of her “hierarchical structure.”

There’s much, much more

Editor’s note: This article should be recommended reading for every Catholic. It’s that good!

As the author so aptly summarizes: So, this is a little bit about the nature of the Church and Catholicism of which all of us who are interested in Catholicism or claim to be Catholics need to recall and study.

Archbishop Sartain is known as a “straight shooter”

Noting his extensive experience with religious communities in the four dioceses where he has served as a priest or bishop, the archbishop expressed his “personal appreciation for the role of religious women in the United States” and “all the extraordinary things that they’ve done.”

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Editor’s note: When he headed up the Illinois Diocese of Joliet, Archbishop Sartain was known as a capable, fair minded executive, a thoroughly Catholic spiritual leader, and a good priest (not necessarily in that order).

This recent “dust-up” with women religious in the United States reminds me of the arguments my dad and my teenage sister used to have about how much and what kind of makeup she was wearing.

As I remember, they never really managed to agree, but they were able to (eventually) come to a mutually acceptable arrangement.

These sisters act as one “face” of the Catholic Church (and Jesus Christ) to the American public. They have a sacred duty to uphold the teachings of the Catholic Church, yet many of them have been failing miserably in that regard, for many, many years.

St. James rightly pointed out that faith without works is dead. The reverse is also true.

An allegedly Catholic sister who fails to uphold the authentic Catholic faith in her everyday work is giving scandalous false witness to her neighbor, while attempting to live the consecrated life in an undisciplined and seriously disordered way.

This particular initiative is long overdue!