Jews, pagans, heretics and corrupt politicians can get in to see the pope, but Father Nicholas Gruner cannot.

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Alleged “phony” consecration to Our Lady doesn’t go unnoticed. Vatican is “stonewalling” concerned critics. Head of Vatican Security tells Father Gruner: “Don’t go near the Pope!” Why is Father Gruner so dangerous? What is the pope’s “end game”?

Text and video

Is Pope Francis secretly disappointed that St. Michael isn’t driving a “humble car” and feeding the poor?

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Pope Francis said the statue of St. Michael with his sword piercing the devil is “an invitation to reflection and prayer.”

“Michael fights to re-establish divine justice,” he said. “He defends the people of God from their enemies, especially the enemy par excellence, the devil.”

The statue is a reminder that evil never wins, the pope said. The devil’s head is “crushed, because salvation was accomplished once for all with the blood of Christ.”

“In consecrating Vatican City to St. Michael the Archangel, we ask him to defend us from the evil one and cast him out,” the pope said.

Link

This Week’s Ask Alice: I arrived late for Mass. Can I still receive Holy Communion?



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“R” asks: On Saturday night I arrived late for Mass, coming in during the Offertory. I didn’t know if it was proper to receive Communion after missing so much of the Mass. How late can a person come to Mass and still receive Communion? Also, can someone receive Communion more than once in a (24-hour) day?

Alice answers: Many faithful Catholics aren’t sure what to do in cases like this. Depending on the circumstances, and if otherwise properly disposed, it is typically OK to receive Communion, even if you arrive very late … at, or even after … the “Our Father”. In fact, you can probably receive even if you happen to come in just as Communion is being distributed.

But since arriving late may not be appreciated by the priest, and such a thing might also be (rightly or wrongly) interpreted by others as being disrespectful to God, it’s always best to arrive for Mass on time (a bit early, if possible) and to take great care to enter the church in a totally unobtrusive, courteous, and pious manner.

Now, about those “circumstances”: If you arrive late (missing the Gospel reading) for a Saturday vigil Mass, the Sunday liturgy, or for Mass on a designated Holy Day … you can still receive Communion, but since you had missed out and failed to participate in an essential part of the first Mass, you would need to attend a second Mass, in order to properly fulfill your Mass obligation. No such requirement applies to typical weekday or Saturday morning liturgies, which while highly recommended for all the faithful, remain purely optional, and not a matter of obligation.

But the good news is … you can receive Holy Communion at both Masses!

According to the Catechism, a Catholic can receive Holy Communion twice in one day, as long as the second time is in context of a Mass (1983 CIC c 917). If in imminent danger of death, Holy Communion may even be received for a third time, that day.

From the above, we also learn that an otherwise properly disposed Catholic may even receive Holy Communion without attending Mass. (Realizing of course, that our full, faithful participation at Mass is often the best way to assure our proper disposition.)

Disposition: More important than the time of our arrival at Mass, a Catholic must be “properly disposed” in order to worthily receive Communion: At a minimum, a person must: 1) be a practicing Catholic, in the state of grace, i.e., with no unconfessed mortal sins; 2) for a period of at least one hour before reception, have fasted from all food and drink (except water and/or medicine); and 3) believe in the Real Presence (the transubstantiation) of Jesus, in the Holy Eucharist.

In the Bible, Saint Paul explains it like this: “Whoever, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord. Let a man examine himself and, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For anyone who eats without discerning the body, eats and drinks judgment on himself.” (1 Corinthians 11:27-29)

How blessed we are as Catholics, to receive the body and blood of Jesus, our Lord and Savior, each time we receive Holy Communion! Ours is a unique privilege that cannot be found in any of the Protestant Christian sects.

It has rightly been said that if Catholics fully realized the true and awesome nature of the Real Presence in the Holy Eucharist, they would gladly CRAWL up on hands and knees, to receive Our Lord, in Holy Communion.

From The Catechism of the Catholic Church: (1413) By the consecration the transubstantiation of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ is brought about. Under the consecrated species of bread and wine Christ himself, living and glorious, is present in a true, real, and substantial manner: his Body and his Blood, with his soul and his divinity. (cf. Council of Trent: *DS 1640; 1651)

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

Click here to see all of Alice’s other columns

Prophetic event? After 93 years, Corpus Christi procession to take place in St. Petersburg, Russia

Rome, Italy, Jun 23, 2011 / 01:50 pm (CNA).- The mayor of St. Petersburg, Russia has granted permission for the first Corpus Christi procession to take place in the city since 1918.

Editor’s note: This is a much bigger development than it might at first, seem. Such a thing would have been impossible, just a few, short years ago. Maybe the alleged flaws in JPII’s earlier (1982-1984) consecration of Russia, an event that has been termed faulty and incomplete by many, have finally been remedied, now that he has been beatified.

Be sure to take a look at the very intriguing time-line of events referenced at the above link.

CNN can’t tell the difference between a priest and a minister. Can you?

Note to CNN: Florida pastor Terry Jones is a protestant minister, with absolutely no power to act as a priest (and incidentally, according to his particular faith, no personal inclination to do so.

For the record: authentic priests offer sacrifice to God, as a propitiation (atoning sacrifice) for the sins of the world.

These days:

The ONLY acceptable sacrifice is Jesus Christ, in the form of authentic Holy Communion.

The ONLY people capable of consecrating bread and wine, in order that it may be transformed into the body, blood, soul and divinity of the risen Christ, are properly ordained Catholic priests.

Some Orthodox priests, belonging to certain churches that were originally established by one of the original apostles, also have this authority.

A few Protestant denominations (Lutheran, Anglican, Episcopal) do indeed refer to their ministers as priests, but due to their separation from the Catholic Church, they lack valid holy orders and so, with no authority from God, they fall far short, in this regard.

The Rev. Terry Jones represents none of the above groups, and is most certainly NOT a priest.

Please, CNN … try to get things right, in the future.
Your ignorance is showing!

More about propitiation

Rare video of St. Pio celebrating the Mass

Saint Pio of Pietrelcina, also known as St. Padre Pio, died in 1968 and was declared a Saint not too long ago. Among many other things, Pio was a mystic, able to see things that (for most of us) don’t seem to actually exist.

The good Padre has just witnessed the Holy Spirit coming down from Heaven to transform bread and wine into the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ. No telling what Pio actually sees, but one thing’s for sure … God most certainly has his undivided attention … and that’s one lesson we can all learn from this holy man, and from virtually all the Saints.

Watch the video

Is the Single Life a Vocation?

Here is the problem: “vocation,” in the sense the Church understands it, means “to give oneself completely.” The Vatican II document Gaudium et Spes says that man finds himself only through a sincere gift of himself. John Paul II, in Mulieris Dignitatem, speaks of the “spousal disposition of women.” We – women and men — were made to give ourselves, in love, to others. That’s where we find happiness.

Don’t singles give? Of course we do – often more than most. But vocation doesn’t mean “being a generous person.” It means giving our lives completely to another – either to a spouse in marriage or to God in consecrated virginity. And singleness doesn’t do that. In fact, the single state is defined by the lack of that gift. We are unattached, un-given.

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