What’s so radical or extreme about properly burying the dead?

As part of their week long anti-Islamic hate fest, Fox News braying heads continue to bray about the dangers of “radical Islam.” So it was interesting to see that their “news” programming would feature a man who is part of an all male religious group dedicated to extremist views that pose a real threat to women and doctors. No, I’m not talking about some radical jihadist mullah, but Catholic priest Fr. Frank Pavone who is part of an order of Catholic priests devoted to putting an end to safe, legal abortion.

Pavone was last seen on Fox touting his daring “rescue” of a terminally ill Canadian child. Today, he was on Fox’s “news” show “Happening Now” where he spoke about his desire to obtain the bodies from Gosnell’s clinic so he can give them a Catholic funeral. While he seems benign enough, his writings say otherwise. But he’s pro-life and that’s all that matters on “fair & balanced” Fox News which is always happy to provide him with a pulpit for “pro-life” propaganda.

Jon Scott reported that Pavone has contacted the judge, in the Gosnell case, about receiving the bodies found in the clinic. Mollie Henneberg provided more information on the “pro-life” priest’s request. While the remains were, medically and legally speaking, fetuses, Hennenberg used the more inflammatory, anti-choice term “baby.” Fetus is the term used in the Grand Jury Report which Hennenberg referenced in describing the remains found at the clinic. She reported that Pavone has asked the medical examiner if he can have bodies after the court proceedings have ended.

Video of Pavone was shown in which he said that these are bodies of “real human beings who were killed” and that they need to be “honored” after they were “dishonored.” He added that his efforts will “raise consciousness” about “real killings.” Henneberg reported that Pavone wants permission to talk with Gosnell. After she concluded, Scott muttered “what a horrible story.”

Text and video

Editor’s note: Instead of decrying the horrors of Gosnell’s murderous abortion mill, the writer chooses to indict Father Frank Pavone for an act of basic human decency; performing one of the Corporal Works of Mercy.

The Corporal Works of Mercy

Feed the hungry
Give drink to the thirsty
Clothe the naked
Shelter the homeless
Visit the sick
Visit the imprisoned
Bury the dead

The level coarseness, ignorance, depravity and basic inhumanity to be found on the pro-abort side never ceases to “boggle” the mind. 

Corporal Work of Mercy: Archdiocese of Chicago to pay for burials of up to 300, currently stacked up in Cook County Morgue.

The offer from Catholic Cemeteries would bear no cost to the county. It would include up to 300 burials to be conducted like any other ordinary, paid burial, the sheriff’s office said. The number of bodies requiring burials will dictate the locations, but some of the including locations include Mt. Olivet Cemetery and other local Catholic cemeteries.

For at least a month now, staff at the morgue have complained that the corpse cooler at the West Side facility is beyond the 300-body capacity, the Sun-Times reported last month.

Link

The 7 Corporal Works of Mercy

The seven practices of charity toward our neighbor,
based on Jesus Christ’s biblical prophecy of the Last Judgment,
that will help to determine each person’s final destiny:

To feed the hungry
To give drink to the thirsty
To clothe the naked
To shelter the homeless
To visit the sick
To visit the imprisoned
To bury the dead

This Week’s Ask Alice: “A Buddha statue in Catholic home” (Click on the included links for a comprehensive Lenten Catholic study)



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She’ll answer as many questions as possible,
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Email responses will also be provided, as time permits.

Chickie writes: While visiting the home of a terminally ill Catholic friend, I was surprised to find a large “Buddha” figurine prominently displayed there.

This seems like paganism and idolatry, and it really bothers me. It also makes me wonder if the presence of this idol might be somehow nullifying the prayers we have been offering up for her recovery.

I feel like I should say something to my friend, but she’s so sick right now, that it might just make things worse.

I’ve also considered writing a note to her husband about it, but I really don’t know if that would be a good idea, either.

None the less, I can’t imagine why good Catholic would have such an image in their home.

I’ve recently been praying hard on this. What do you think I should I do?

Alice answers: Does your Catholic friend have a crucifix or picture of Jesus in her house? If so, that is a good sign.

Since she is terminally ill, the present time is not opportune for arguing about the Buddha figurine in her home. Sick people and their caregivers are suffering much pain and can become upset easily. You are correct in thinking that your well-intentioned comments might make things worse. You don’t want your friend and her husband to slam the door on your future visits.

A Buddha statue cannot harm a baptized, faithful Catholic. The mere presence of the statue will not nullify prayers for her recovery.

Siddhartha Gautama Buddha (563-483 B.C.) was a spiritual teacher who founded the Buddhist religion. He was a human being, not a pagan god. If you saw a statue of Abraham Lincoln or Dr. Martin Luther King in a Catholic home, you would assume that the family felt deep respect for a good man. You would not worry that they were worshiping idols.

(Important note: The Buddhist religion typically incorporates many elements of two pagan belief systems known as Pantheism and Brahminism, which are both in serious conflict with many/most authentic Catholic/Christian beliefs and practices.)

If you feel compelled to speak, simply ask where your friend got the Buddha statue. If she received it as a gift from an Asian friend or purchased it as a decoration for her home, then the only problem is that your taste in decorating differs from hers.

If your Catholic friend said that she prays to Buddha, then she is mixing religions, which is definitely wrong. However, no demonic influence is likely to result from her misguided efforts, since she faithfully prays to our Triune God.

Please don’t allow a figurine to separate you from your sick friend. By arguing over Buddha, Satan might work his wiles and alienate your friend. Instead, ignore the Buddha while visiting, then say a prayer privately that the statue will be removed from her home. If your budget permits, you might buy a crucifix or statue of Jesus and wrap it up as a gift for your dear friend.

Above all, please stay focused on your mission to “visit the sick” and “pray for the living and the dead,” which are Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy. “Where two or three are gathered in My name, there am I in their midst.” (Matthew 18:20)

You are doing wonderful work in supporting your dying friend and her husband! Your charity pleases God (the real one). Just keep doing your job (prayerful visits) and leave your worries about the Buddha statue to God. That’s His job.

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

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More about statues and images