Exorcist explains how Catholics ought to live their faith

“Obviously, one should frequent the sacraments — especially Confession and Communion — pray every day, and cultivate a loving and fruitful relationship with Our Lord, Our Lady and the saints. In addition, one should do a regular (daily) examination of conscience, with prayers that the Holy Spirit might enlighten us to any secret sins.

“It goes without saying that Catholics should avoid any contact with the occult, Ouija boards, magic crystals, New Age practitioners, anything having to do with Wicca, witchcraft, or even the Goth movement. Also, we need to be conscious of Christ’s command to forgive others. We need to forgive those who harm us and practice charity to those who have hurt us. We have to be very, very careful not to nurse grudges or slights, or hold on to anger or refuse to forgive others for their crimes against us. All this is what we should be praying for daily.”

Read more at Matt C. Abotts’s column

New age deception

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Moira Noonan had been immersed in the New Age movement and its practices for 25 years before a remnant of truth from her Catholic school days made her take a second look at her life.

“I said, ‘Thank you, Sacred Heart nuns from second grade,’” recalled Noonan, author of Ransomed from Darkness: The New Age, Christian Faith and the Battle for Souls. “I had some shred of faith left after being completely brainwashed by the New Age mindset.”

Spiritual fraud

Noonan’s foray into the New Age began in earnest when she sought treatment at a hypnosis clinic after an auto accident. It ended when she was told that the Blessed Virgin Mary was the “heaven goddess” who had come down to meet the “mother earth goddess.”

“My reaction was: There’s no way,” Noonan said, adding that she knew Mary was not a goddess. If this was a lie, she thought, “What else have I been taught that’s a lie?”

She started questioning everything she had embraced — religious science, hypnotherapy, clairvoyance, spiritual channeling, Reiki, crystals and more — and soon rejected it all before returning to the Catholic faith.

Since then, Noonan has been on a mission to warn Catholics about the dangers of dabbling in the New Age. Even a little New Age practice mixed with Catholicism can affect one’s attitude toward the faith, she said, leading to a superstitious rather than a sacramental life.

Others similarly concerned about the impact of the New Age agree that Catholics need to be wary, especially in today’s culture.

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