Eating death and drinking damnation

I have no respect for Catholics who trot on up to the Communion line and say, “Look at me, I’m progressive!  If only Christ were willing to come down from that cross and dialogue with me about compassion, then we’d get somewhere!”

If they don’t know what they’re doing, then we pray that God will crack that terrible shell of ignorance and indifference, and they will seek repentance.   But if these “pro-choice Catholics” do knowingly flout the teaching of the sanctity of life and yet refuse to abstain from receiving the body, blood, soul and divinity of Christ, then when they reach the head of that line, they are eating death and drinking damnation.  This is the teaching of the Church.

But there is someone even worse than a pro-choice Catholic..

Who is worse?  Their God.  The God of the pro-choice Catholic is an idiot God.

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Tom Roeser’s thoughts about !@#$%! (Cussing)


“Do you know what that officious bastard wrote in The New York Times today? He tried to dress up research in embryonic stem cells as vital to saving lives when he knows—fully knows—that adult stem cells can do the job. You know what? That sonuvabitch simply glories in defending an act of snuffing out lives!”

The fact remains that I feel better when I say this…and that’s important—important to let repressed steam be released…a safety valve that spares bottled up blood pressure.

Let’s be clear. Cussing fate with a string of denunciatory colorful words is different from cursing where you call down evil on someone. Or invoke God to strike someone dead. That’s altogether different. I would judge that to say “goddammit” is different than slowly pronouncing “God damn so-and-so!” Although I’ve been known to do that as well. But seriously calling down evil on someone and invoking God to do it is blasphemy.

(Father) Ernie once told us that to curse rational creatures is a grave offense against justice and charity. When I sat in his classroom so long ago listening to him I thought—and still think—but if you say this to yourself and do not poison this guy’s reputation by enunciating it to someone else but to yourself in solitude, what’s wrong with that? It makes me feel better. And who hears it when I mutter to myself? Ever since that time I have doubted Ernie on that particular item. How do you sin against justice and charity if you growl to yourself imprecations against an unfeeling boss for example?

Another thing Ernie would say is this: “To curse irrational creatures such as the weather or animals who let us say defecate on the floor is a venial sin of impatience.” Wha? Do you understand what I’m getting at here? Is it not possible that we are too Jansenist in this business of cussing? Do we imagine that General George Armstrong Custer at the battle of Little Big Horn…when suddenly surrounded by 3,000 Indians who seemingly came thundering out of the hills from ostensibly nowhere…and remembering that he foolishly left a supply of Gatling guns at Yellowstone because he felt they would not be needed…said:

“Oh my gosh where did these darned Indians come from all of a sudden? And gee whiz, I wish I had the Gatling guns!”

Ernie also said this: “To curse the evil spirit as the enemy of God and human beings is lawful.” That means I guess I can say: “God damn the devil and all his works!”

But Ernie, being Ernie, added: “Exclamations that in themselves are not sinful may become so for other reasons such as the danger of scandal.”

Read more at Tom’s site

Pie chart courtesy of GraphJam.com

El Paso priest “gets it right” on homosexuality, once again.

In a column issued earlier this month entitled “Every Catholic Must Oppose Certain Things,” Rodriguez laid out the simple proposition that “Every single Catholic, out of fidelity to charity and truth, has the absolute duty to oppose (1) the murder of unborn babies, and (2) any and all government attempts to legalize homosexual unions.”

“I urge all of the Catholic faithful to treat homosexuals with love, understanding, and respect,” wrote the priest, who called homosexuality an “unequivocally intrinsic moral evil” alongside abortion. “At the same time, never forget that genuine love demands that we seek, above all, the salvation of souls. Homosexual acts lead to the damnation of souls.”

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Peter Hitchens not quite like his atheist big brother

Rogier van der Weyden’s “Last Judgment”

A far-Left cultural revolutionary in the 1970s, Hitchens was in his early 30s, and had experienced life behind the Iron Curtain covering the Polish shipyard strikes when he began to feel strong unease.

“I no longer avoided churches,” he writes. “I recognised in the great English cathedrals, and in many small parish churches, the old unsettling messages. One was the inevitability of my own death, the other the undoubted fact that my despised forebears were neither crude nor ignorant, but men and women of great skill and engineering genius, a genius not contradicted or blocked by faith, but enhanced by it.”

On a cycling trip to Burgundy he saw Rogier van der Weyden’s 15th-century Last Judgment, and this made a lasting impression. “I had scoffed at its mention in the guidebook, but now I gaped, my mouth actually hanging open, at the naked figures fleeing towards the pit of hell. I had a sudden strong sense of religion being a thing of the present day, not imprisoned under thick layers of time. My large catalogue of misdeeds replayed themselves rapidly in my head.

I had absolutely no doubt that I was among the damned, if there were any damned. Van der Weyden was still earning his fee, nearly 500 years after his death.”

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How do you get into Heaven?

Q: How do you get into Heaven?

A: God is love.

Love is another word for charity.

Anyone who departs this sphere of existence with at least some charity remaining in their soul is not likely to see eternal damnation.

That said, there’s no substitute for a lifetime of faithful and charitable participation in all of the work, worship, sacraments, and devotions of the Catholic church.

Of course, Jesus remains the sole judge.

What’s the difference between saved and truly saved?

judgment.jpg

 

Q: What’s the difference between saved and truly saved? I hear that a lot here.

A: Hear this:

The difference is grace, which is a share in God’s very own divine life.

God is love. Love is just another word for charity.

Anyone who departs this sphere of existence with at least some charity remaining in their soul, is not likely to see eternal damnation.

1Co 13:1 If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal.
1Co 13:2 And if I should have prophecy and should know all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I should have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing.
1Co 13:3 And if I should distribute all my goods to feed the poor, and if I should deliver my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing.
1Co 13:4 Charity is patient, is kind: charity envieth not, dealeth not perversely, is not puffed up,
1Co 13:5 Is not ambitious, seeketh not her own, is not provoked to anger, thinketh no evil:
1Co 13:6 Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth with the truth:
1Co 13:7 Beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things.
1Co 13:8 Charity never falleth away: whether prophecies shall be made void or tongues shall cease or knowledge shall be destroyed.
1Co 13:9 For we know in part: and we prophesy in part.
1Co 13:10 But when that which is perfect is come, that which is in part shall be done away.
1Co 13:11 When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child. But, when I became a man, I put away the things of a child.
1Co 13:12 We see now through a glass in a dark manner: but then face to face. Now I know in part: but then I shall know even as I am known.
1Co 13:13 And now there remain faith, hope, and charity, these three: but the greatest of these is charity.

The most effective way to remove the doubt about your eternal destiny is through a lifetime of full, active, and charitable participation in all of the work, worship, sacraments, and devotions of the Church.

Preferably, the Catholic Church … since it’s the only Church that Jesus ever founded, and eternally guaranteed, for the purpose of our salvation.

And lest any man should boast … the Church is not a work of man … but a manifestation of God’s love and supernatural provision.

Our participation in the Church is no more of a “work” than that of a patient who goes into the hospital to have life-saving heart surgery.