The egalitarian ideology of our time cuts the human heart and soul out of the profession of the teacher.

Forty years ago, a few wise men at the college where I teach, motivated both by that acknowledgment of authority and by their belief in the ontological equality of all mankind, embarked on a brave reform.

At the time when the elite colleges were scrapping their curricula, effectively burning the books of three thousand years of our Western heritage, our faculty dedicated themselves to something beyond themselves, deserving of their honor. What if the elites at Harvard no longer honored and studied Dante? The students at our college would do so—the children of ordinary people, not rich, and perhaps not destined for riches, either.

What if the technicians of education no longer saw any use for the political wisdom of Aristotle and Plato? The faculty at our school, not exalted technicians with conveniently reductive equations, but rather human beings asking the human questions, would try to recover and hand on something of their wisdom.

They welcomed those young people with equal heartiness into a world of glorious inequality. I cannot say we have always succeeded at the task. But it has at least been a human enterprise. And that is more than I can say for most of what goes on in the egalitarian prison house that goes by the name of “school.”

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Fr. Barron on “dumbed down” Catholicism


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Read his recommendations (for free):

Contra Gentiles (St. Thomas Aquinas)

Confessions (St. Augustine)

Divine Comedy (Dante)

Orthodoxy (G. K. Chesterton)

The Mind’s Road To God (St. Bonaventure)

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