Why the Catholic Church is right about prohibiting embryonic stem cell destruction

Even a child old enough to know about human reproduction realizes that his (or her) life as a human being begin the moment his (or her) father’s sperm penetrated his (or her) mother’s egg.  A secular children’s book on the biology of human reproduction from my local library is very clear that life begins at conception as well.  It reads:

“But nine months before, when you first began, you were just one little cell, even smaller than the dot at the end of this sentence. Half of this cell came from your mother’s body, and the other half came from your father’s body.”

Essentially, the Catholic Church says that human life begins at conception not in spite of science but because of it.

So then why is the beginnings of human life such a hotly debated issue?  I believe it is because the debate about when life begins is actually focused on the wrong question or rather questions.

It is not a matter biologically of when a new human organism begins.  That is an established fact.  The real debate is about whether or not human life has value, whether or not an embryo or fetus has moral worth simply because he (or she) is human and whether or not every human life deserves respect and protection.  When people say that life does not begin at conception I think what they are really saying is that they do not believe that embryonic life has value and that it does not deserve to be protected.

The Catholic Church teaches that the new human life that begins at conception has dignity and worth simply because it is human.  Catholics know that human life is present from the moment of fertilization.  We also know that all human life is intrinsically valuable.

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The life giving quality of classical education is born in the culture of life and civilization of love the blood of Christ once made possible and still makes possible today.

Classical education is oriented towards the wisdom of contemplation, and because of this, such education opens students up to the possibility of living a wonderful life. It is precisely that we might live life to the full that the Lord came.

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The Significance of Genuflections and Other Gestures

ROME, JAN. 21, 2010 (Zenit.org).- Faith in the presence of the Lord, and in particular in his Eucharistic presence, is expressed in an exemplary manner by the priest when he genuflects with profound reverence during the Holy Mass or before the Eucharist.

In the post-conciliar liturgy, these acts of devotion have been reduced to a minimum in the name of sobriety. The result is that genuflections have become a rarity, or a superficial gesture. We have become stingy with our gestures of reverence before the Lord, even though we often praise Jews and Muslims for their fervor and manner way of praying.

More than words, a genuflection manifests the humility of the priest, who knows he is only a minister, and his dignity, as he is able to render the Lord present in the sacrament. However, there are other signs of devotion.

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What Catholics know about God that Protestants typically don’t. Or won’t.


God respects the dignity of the human race, (which he created in his own image and likeness) by kindly remembering to include the People of God (along with our good works/voluntary cooperation with his grace) in his ongoing, universal plan of salvation.

It makes no difference where we (or the saints) might presently happen to be, since Heaven poses absolutely no obstacles to the awesome power of divine love and grace (with the unfortunate but notable exception of those already in Hell.)

This is the basic premise behind the Traditional Catholic practice of venerating the Blessed Virgin Mary, along with all the other saints. It also forms the basis for the belief that the saints do indeed have the necessary power and authority from God, to intercede on our behalf.

It’s all totally biblical, and an essential function
of God’s “amazing” grace.

When the Kids Grow Up and Find Out About the Test Tubes


Although they clearly face elevated health risks for a number of diseases and physical disorders, the psychological effects on these children have not been thoroughly studied. Nevertheless, children born from other, closely related technologies, like anonymous sperm donation, are starting to be tracked, and researchers are finding that these children face significant difficulties in dealing with their feelings and emotions as they grow older. They oftentimes struggle with their own sense of dignity and identity, with their need for a father, and with a desire to understand their family connection.

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“Sanctifying grace makes a couple’s souls beautiful in the eyes of God. Sacramental grace helps a couple to live their vows. A Catholic marriage is not just a legal contract. It is a covenant, between you, your spouse and God.”


How to Have a Grace-Filled Marriage

Vatican officials: in supporting immigrants, the church is acting on principle, not pragmatism.

In Europe, as in the United States, the Roman Catholic Church has assumed a leading role as a protector of, and advocate for, immigrants. But whereas the largest bloc of migrants to the United States are Catholic, the majority of European immigrants are Muslim.

In the United States, some critics of the church accuse outspoken clerics such as Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles of self-interest when they support immigrant rights and immigration reform. There is logic to the argument because Latin American Catholics are pumping new life into a church that has been losing its hold on many native-born Americans.

Such an argument is more difficult to make in Europe, where the ranks of native-born Catholics are declining without being refreshed by large numbers of Catholic immigrants. Vatican officials say that, in supporting immigrants, the church is acting on principle, not pragmatism — and that the Catholic record in Europe lends credence to those who say that American bishops have pure intentions in their immigration advocacy.

“For the church, the perspective is … the right of the human person to be treated with dignity,” said Father Federico Lombardi, the chief Vatican spokesman. “It is a general principle; it’s not just a religious principle. It is more profound.”

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