De facto schism: Year by year the dissenters have moved farther and farther from Catholic orthodoxy.

schism

For fifty years in this country the dissenters and accomodationists have traveled along the corridors of the Church without much serious interference from the hierarchy, living in a kind of parallel church or church within a church, with its own rules and answerable only to itself, all the while funded with money donated (in many cases) by misled and victimized faithful Catholics. Which is to say that we have something that is very close to a de facto schism.

Year by year the dissenters’ theology has moved farther and farther from Catholic orthodoxy, and with few exceptions no one has been calling them out. Unlike their dissenting cousins on the other end of the theological spectrum, the Lefebvrists, who left the Church in formal schism, the liberal dissenters have been clever and officially stayed inside the Church… and in control of their institutions and positions of power. Of course, this could only happen because the hierarchy has allowed it to happen, and in some instances even promoted it by placing dissenters and accomodationists in positions of influence in chancery offices and Catholic schools, and in the departments of the United States Catholic Conference itself.

In some cases entire institutions are in open defiance of Church teaching.

Read more

International Theological Commission (ITC) sows confusion, dissent

They have had published two papers which are available on the ITC website. In these two theological papers they have written that the Catholic Church no more teaches exclusive salvation. Since there can be those saved in invincible ignorance (LG 16) etc. So there are known exceptions to the dogma extra ecclesiam nulla salus.

So when they made their Profession of Faith and took an Oath of Fidelity they recited the Nicene Constantinople Creed in which we pray ‘I believe in one baptism for the forgiveness of sin’. However they really meant that not every one on earth needs the baptism of water for salvation. There could be known people saved in invincible ignorance etc. So in actuality there is not one baptism of water for the forgiveness of sin. There are known exceptions in the present times.

Their understanding of the Church is also different, even though in the Profession of Faith they said ‘ I believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.’

Read more from Lionel Andrades

1968 was a very bad year for the Catholic Church … and the world

English historian Paul Johnson dubs 1968 as the year of “America’s Suicide Attempt.” It included the Tet offensive in Vietnam with its tsunami-like effects in American life and politics, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee; the tumult in American cities on Palm Sunday weekend; and the June assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy in Southern California. It was also the year in which Pope Paul VI issued his encyclical letter on transmitting human life, Humanae Vitae (HV). He met immediate, premeditated, and unprecedented opposition from some American theologians and pastors. By any measure, 1968 was a bitter cup….

The summer of 1968 is a record of God’s hottest hour. The memories are not forgotten; they are painful. They remain vivid like a tornado in the plains of Colorado. They inhabit the whirlwind where God’s wrath dwells. In 1968, something terrible happened in the Church. Within the ministerial priesthood, ruptures developed everywhere among friends which never healed. And the wounds continue to affect the whole Church. The dissent, together with the leaders’ manipulation of the anger they fomented, became a supreme test. It changed fundamental relationships within the Church. It was a Peirasmòs [i.e. a trial, a test of faith] for many.

During the height of the 1968 Baltimore riots following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., I had made an emergency call to [an] inner-city pastor…He described the view from the rectory while speaking on the phone…his parish was becoming a raging inferno. He said, “From here I see nothing but fire burning everywhere. Everything has been set ablaze. The Church and rectory are untouched thus far.” He did not wish to leave or be evacuated. His voice betrayed disillusionment and fear. Later we learned that the parish buildings survived.

Memories of the physical violence in the city in April 1968 [following the king Assassination] helped me to name what had happened in August 1968 [in the explosion of dissent against Humanae Vitae]. Ecclesial dissent can become a kind of spiritual violence in its form and content.

What do I mean? Look at the results of the two events. After the violent 1968 Palm Sunday weekend, civil dialogue in metropolitan Baltimore broke down and came to a stop. It took a back seat to open anger and recriminations between whites and blacks. The…priests’ August gathering [against Humane Vitae] gave rise to its own ferocious acrimony. Conversations among the clergy…became contaminated with fear. Suspicions among priests were chronic. Fears abounded. And they continue. The Archdiocesan priesthood lost something of the fraternal whole which Baltimore priests had known for generations. 1968 marked the hiatus of the generational communio….Priests’ fraternity had been wounded. Pastoral dissent had attacked the Eucharistic foundation of the Church. Its nuptial significance had been denied. Some priests saw bishops as nothing more than Roman mannequins.

Cardinal Shehan later reported that on Monday morning, August 5, he “was startled to read in the Baltimore Sun that seventy-two priests of the Baltimore area had signed the Statement of Dissent.” What he later called “the years of crisis” began for him during that hot… August evening in 1968….Its unhinging consequences continue. Abusive, coercive dissent has become a reality in the Church and subjects her to violent, debilitating, unproductive, chronic controversies.

The violence of the initial disobedience was only a prelude to further and more pervasive violence. …Contempt for the truth, whether aggressive or passive, has become common in Church life. Dissenting priests, theologians and laypeople have continued their coercive techniques. From the beginning, the press has used them to further its own serpentine agenda.  (These are excerpts, Click HERE for the full article).

Read more form Msgr. Charles Pope

Michael Voris responds to a Catholic college student’s email.

First ..the email ..

“Hello!  I am writing on behalf of a few of my friends who go to [a university].

I first want to thank you for the work you guys do.  The information that you provide in your videos has helped my few friends and I begin the conversion process of some protestants.  I really want to express my gratitude for this.

However, we have a huge problem.  The Newman Center on campus is such a problem for all Catholics here.  For example, one of our priests here preaches about being a “flexible” Catholic.

Another priest tells students that their sexual activity on campus is okay.  My friends and I went to this workshop on developing a relationship with God.  These old women there spent time discussing about how the Church “is not black and white” and “has many in-consistencies.”

This was all being taught by the Director of Religious Education at the parish!  My friends and I knew it was bad, but we had no idea.  The reason why I am writing this is because I don’t know what to do.

The spiritual damage to all of the students who go the the Newman Center is sickening and saddening.  What should we, as faithful Catholics, do besides just pray?  We pray for things to change all the time, but on a more active role what can we do to help change the situation?

Thank you so much.  The work you do is amazing.  I pray for this ministry every day!

God bless you!”

Read Michael’s response (PDF)

Or watch the video

Attend the Michael Voris Chicago area speaking event, April 30

Scandals in the church

A Catholic Perspective

Answering Scandal with Personal Holiness
Fr. Roger J. Landry: Perhaps the single best commentary on the matter.

Tell Father You See Jesus
Bud Macfarlane: The attack on the twin towers of our faith.

The Catholic Bishops and the Scandals
Kenneth Whitehead: Why so many bishops ignore dissent.

A Close Look at Voice of the Faithful
Deal Hudson: “VOTF is simply another group of dissenters.”

The Bishop’s Secret Letter
Deal Hudson: Eight American bishops call for a Plenary Council.

Scapegoating and the Scandals
Father Richard John Neuhaus: Where there is no mercy, there is no hope.

The Deficiencies of the Bishop’s Policy
Charles Rice: Vague definitions leads to the intimidation or blackmail of priests.

Homosexuality, Dissent and Modernism – The Roots Of Abuse
“The bishops still don’t get it.”

See 20 more articles like this at CatholicCity.com

“In 1968, something terrible happened in the (Catholic) Church”

sttpetersquare

Retiring Cardinal Stafford reflects on how dissenters to Humane Vitae tore the Church apart – and how rift left scars that remain to this day.

It was the year of the bad war, of complex innocence that sanctified the shedding of blood. English historian Paul Johnson dubs 1968 as the year of “America’s Suicide Attempt.” It included the Tet offensive in Vietnam with its tsunami-like effects in American life and politics, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee; the tumult in American cities on Palm Sunday weekend; and the June assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy in Southern California. It was also the year in which Pope Paul VI issued his encyclical letter on transmitting human life, Humanae Vitae (HV). He met immediate, premeditated, and unprecedented opposition from some American theologians and pastors. By any measure, 1968 was a bitter cup.

Read the article, courtesy of California Catholic Daily

How all the Catholic college nonsense began – The 1967 Land O’ Lakes Statement

(Read it and weep!)

Land O’ Lakes Statement on the Nature of the Contemporary Catholic University

1967

From: The Catholic University, Neil G. McCluskey, S.J, University of Notre Dame Press, 1970.

1. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY: A TRUE UNIVERSITY WITH DISTINCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS

The Catholic University today must be a university in the full modern sense of the word, with a strong commitment to and concern for academic excellence. To perform its teaching and research functions effectively the Catholic university must have a true autonomy and academic freedom in the face of authority of whatever kind, lay or clerical, external to the academic community itself. To say this is simply to assert that institutional autonomy and academic freedom are essential conditions of life and growth and indeed of survival for Catholic universities as for all universities.

The Catholic university participates in the total university life of our time, has the same functions as all other true universities and, in general, offers the same services to society. The Catholic university adds to the basic idea of a modern university distinctive characteristics which round out and fulfill that idea. Distinctively, then, the Catholic university must be an institution, a community of learners or a community of scholars, in which Catholicism is perceptibly present and effectively operative.

2. THE THEOLOGICAL DISCIPLINES

In the Catholic university this operative presence is effectively achieved first of all and distinctively by the presence of a group of scholars in all branches of theology. The disciplines represented by this theological group are recognized in the Catholic university, not only as legitimate intellectual disciplines, but as ones essential to the integrity of a university. Since the pursuit of the theological sciences is therefore a high priority for a Catholic university, academic excellence in these disciplines becomes a double obligation in a Catholic university.

3. THE PRIMARY TASK OF THE THEOLOGICAL FACULTY

The theological faculty must engage directly in exploring the depths of Christian tradition and the total religious heritage of the world, in order to come to the best possible intellectual understanding of religion and revelation, of man in all his varied relationships to God. Particularly important today is the theological exploration of all human relations and the elaboration of a Christian anthropology. Furthermore, theological investigation today must serve the ecumenical goals of collaboration and unity.

4. INTERDISCIPLINARY DIALOGUE IN THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY

To carry out this primary task properly there must be a constant discussion within the university community in which theology confronts all the rest of modern culture and all the areas of intellectual study which it includes.

Theology needs this dialogue in order:

A) to enrich itself from the other disciplines;

B) to bring its own insights to bear upon the problems of modern culture; and

C) to stimulate the internal development of the disciplines themselves.

In a Catholic university all recognized university areas of study are frankly and fully accepted and their internal autonomy affirmed and guaranteed. There must be no theological or philosophical imperialism; all scientific and disciplinary methods, and methodologies, must be given due honor and respect. However, there will necessarily result from the interdisciplinary discussions an awareness that there is a philosophical and theological dimension to most intellectual subjects when they are pursued far enough. Hence, in a Catholic university there will be a special interest in interdisciplinary problems and relationships.

This total dialogue can be eminently successful:

A) if the Catholic university has a broad range of basic university disciplines;

B) if the university has achieved considerable strength in these disciplines; and

C) if there are present in many or most of the non-theological areas Christian scholars who are not only interested in, and competent in their own fields, but also have a personal interest in the cross-disciplinary confrontation.

This creative dialogue will involve the entire university community, will inevitably influence and enliven classroom activities, and will be reflected in curriculum and in academic programs.

5. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY AS THE CRITICAL REFLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE OF THE CHURCH

Every university, Catholic or not, serves as the critical reflective intelligence of its society. In keeping with this general function, the Catholic university has the added obligation of performing this same service for the Church. Hence, the university should carry on a continual examination of all aspects and all activities of the Church and should objectively evaluate them. The Church would thus have the benefit of continual counsel from Catholic universities. Catholic universities in the recent past have hardly played this role at all. It may well be one of the most important functions of the Catholic university of the future.

6. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY AND RESEARCH

The Catholic university will, of course, maintain and support broad programs of research. It will promote basic research in all university fields but, in addition, it will be prepared to undertake by preference, though not exclusively, such research as will deal with problems of greater human urgency or of greater Christian concern.

7. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY AND PUBLIC SERVICE

In common with other universities, and in accordance with given circumstances, the Catholic university is prepared to serve society and all its parts, e.g., the Federal Government, the inner-city, etc. However, it will have an added special obligation to carry on similar activities, appropriate to a university, in order to serve the Church and its component parts.

8. SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

The effective intellectual presence of the theological disciplines will affect the education and life of the students in ways distinctive of a Catholic university.

With regard to the undergraduate– the university should endeavor to present a collegiate education that is truly geared to modern society. The student must come to a basic understanding of the actual world in which he lives today. This means that the intellectual campus of a Catholic university has no boundaries and no barriers. It draws knowledge and understanding from all the traditions of mankind; it explores the insights and achievements of the great men of every age; it looks to the current frontiers of advancing knowledge and brings all the results to bear relevantly on man’s life today. The whole world of knowledge and ideas must be open to the student; there must be no outlawed books or subjects. Thus the student will be able to develop his own capabilities and to fulfill himself by using the intellectual resources presented to him.

Along with this and integrated into it should be a competent presentation of relevant, living, Catholic thought.

This dual presentation is characterized by the following emphases:

A) a concern with ultimate questions; hence a concern with theological and philosophical questions;

B) a concern for the full human and spiritual development of the student; hence a humanistic and personalistic orientation with special emphasis on the interpersonal relationships within the community of learners;

C) a concern with the particularly pressing problems of our era, e.g., civil rights, international development and peace, poverty, etc.

9. SOME SPECIAL SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CATHOLIC COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS

As a community of learners, the Catholic university has a social existence and an organizational form.

Within the university community the student should be able not simply to study theology and Christianity, but should find himself in a social situation in which he can express his Christianity in a variety of ways and live it experientially and experimentally. The students and faculty can explore together new forms of Christian living, of Christian witness, and of Christian service.

The students will be able to participate in and contribute to a variety of liturgical functions, at best, creatively contemporary and experimental. They will find the meaning of the sacraments for themselves by joining theoretical understanding to the lived experience of them. Thus the students will find and indeed create extraordinary opportunities for a full, meaningful liturgical and sacramental life.

The students will individually and in small groups carry on a warm personal dialogue with themselves and with faculty, both priests and laymen.

The students will experiment further in Christian service by under taking activities embodying the Christian interest in all human problems – inner-city social action, personal aid to the educationally disadvantaged, and so forth.

Thus will arise within the Catholic university a self-developing and self-deepening society of students and faculty in which the consequences of Christian truth are taken seriously in person-to-person relationships, where the importance of religious commitment is accepted and constantly witnessed to, and where the students can learn by personal experience to consecrate their talent and learning to worthy social purposes.

All of this will display itself on the Catholic campus as a distinctive style of living, a perceptible quality in the university’s life.

10. CHARACTERISTICS OF ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION

The total organization should reflect this same Christian spirit. The social organization should be such as to emphasize the university’s concern for persons as individuals and for appropriate participation by all members of the community of learners in university decisions. University decisions and administrative actions should be appropriately guided by Christian ideas and ideals and should eminently display the respect and concern for persons.

The evolving nature of the Catholic university will necessitate basic reorganizations of structure in order not only to achieve a greater internal cooperation and participation, but also to share the responsibility of direction more broadly and to enlist wider support. A great deal of study and experimentation will be necessary to carry out these changes, but changes of this kind are essential for the future of the Catholic university.

In fine, the Catholic university of the future will be a true modern university but specifically Catholic in profound and creative ways for the service of society and the people of God.

NOTE

*Position paper adopted, July 20-2, 1967, at Land O’Lakes, Wisc., by the seminar participants: Gerard J. Campbell, S.J., President, Georgetown University; John Cogley, Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, Santa Barbara, Calif.; Charles F. Donovan, S.J., Academic Vice President, Boston College; Most Rev. John J. Dougherty, Chairman, Episcopal Committee for Catholic Higher Education and President, Seton Hall University, South Orange, N.J.; Thomas R. Fitzgerald, S.J., Academic Vice President, Georgetown University; Rev. F. Raymond Fowerbaugh, Assistant to the President, Catholic University of America; Most Rev. Paul J. Hallinan, Archbishop of Atlanta; Robert J. Henle, S.J., Academic Vice President, Saint Louis University; Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., President, University of Notre Dame; Howard J. Kenna, C.S.C., Provincial, Indiana Province, Congregation of Holy Cross, Robert D. Kidera, Vice President for University Relations, Fordham University; Germain-Marie Lalande, C.S.C., Superior General, Congregation of Holy Cross, Rome, Italy; Felipe E. MacGregor, SJ., Rector, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Lima, Peru; Right Rev. Theodore E. McCarrick, President, Catholic University of Puerto Rico, Ponce; Neil G. McCluskey, S.J., Secretary of the Seminar, University of Notre Dame; Leo McLaughlin, S.J., President, Fordham University; Vincent T. O’Keefe, S.J., Assistant General, Society of Jesus, Rome, Italy; Right Rev. Alphonse-Marie Parent, Laval University, Quebec, Canada; Paul C. Reinert, S.J., President, Saint Louis University, M. L’abbe Lorenzo Roy, Vice Rector, Laval University; Daniel L. Schlafly, Chairman, Board of Trustees, Saint Louis University; George N. Shuster, Assistant to the President, University of Notre Dame; Edmund A. Stephan, Chairman, Board of Trustees, University of Notre Dame; M. L’abbe Lucien Vachon, Dean, Faculty of Theology, University of Sherbrook, Canada; John E. Walsh, C.S.C., Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Notre Dame; Michael P. Walsh, S.J., President, Boston College.