“It’s like a Vatican II bizarro world.” – writer doesn’t think much of Divine Mercy devotions.

by Doug Lawrence

Many traditionalists identify Divine Mercy Sunday as the premier feast day of the liberal, modernist wing of the post-Vatican II Catholic Church, complete with it’s own severely “protestantized” characterization of Jesus Christ.

Isn’t divine mercy what Jesus, the Catholic Church, the Mass and the Sacraments have always been about … offering the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ up to God the Father, for the sins of the whole world … all around the globe … 24/7 and 365 … for the last 2000 years, and counting?

Neither is “Jesus, I trust in you.” exactly new or original. Faith is a cardinal virtue, propagated by God’s superabundant grace, and as such, that disposition should already be  present in virtually every Christian, everywhere.

Still and all, Divine Mercy Sunday offers us the opportunity to obtain an extra plenary indulgence, and in terms of the Easter Season, it also serves as a form of mystagogia (a directed attempt at grasping the Mystery of God) in the hope of gaining a better personal understanding and appreciation of such things … which is never a bad idea.

You’ll find me at my local parish this Sunday, in the school gym, showing the film, “Time for Mercy”. If things go according to plan I might be able to attend the holy hour devotions, and maybe even get to confession.

In keeping with the spirit of the day, I’ll leave the details up to Jesus … since … as a matter of fact … like Saint Faustina … I really do trust in him.

Here’s a link to the article

What do you think about all this? Your comments are always welcome.

About the movie (from Amazon.com) Learn of the startling revelations of Jesus Christ to a young Polish nun in the heart of Poland and the incredible message of Mercy given to her for the world.

In this film, you will hear amazing testimony, witness remarkable footage, and ultimately be challenged to decide how important these divine revelations are for you and the world. Don’t miss why this moment, unlike any other moment in history, is the Time for Mercy.

Divine Mercy Celebration at Our Lady of Peace – Darien, IL – Sunday – April 15, 2012

Our Lady of Peace Parish
701 W. Plainfield Road
Darien, IL 60559

1:30 – 2:45 pm Confessions (resume at 4:00pm)
It is not possible for everyone to go to confession on the same day.
As Fr. Seraphim, MIC has said: “God will not ask us to do the impossible”.
We should be preparing for the Feast of Mercy
during the whole season of Lent,
and we should make our confession even before Holy Week.
To gain grace, one should make a good confession
within the week of the Divine Mercy Feast Day.

1:30 pm Video “Time for Mercy” Video in School Gym
Find out ……
– The origin of the devotion
– Jesus’ message to St. Faustina
– How this devotion impacts our world today

3:00 – 4:00 pm Hour of Great Mercy
– Exposition
– Chaplet of The Divine Mercy
– Benediction
– Blessing of Religious Articles
– Veneration of St. Faustina’s relic

1:30 & 4 – 5 pm Gift shop open in school lobby

“Jesus, I Trust In You!”

Submitted by Heidi B.

Reader Paul comments on JPII beatification and papal Mass article

I am writing just to congratulate you on the very good review you gave on John Paul’s Mass in Chicago, re:

All criticisms aside, you can’t help loving John Paul II. I figure God does, too! of 2nd May weblog

I am always seeing red when I see some supposedly intelligent Catholics pour scorn on the person of John Paul. It seems to me in passing that they lack common charity and for all their intellectual rumblings they present a mean minded lord as fit for devotion by a very few elite.

I recall back in 2005 and it was Wednesday of that Easter week when I complained to God that I did not understand why he had not taken him at Easter? Like a slap in the face, I was immediately pulled up on where in the week I was and recall saying out loud at this realization “Oh. . My God . .”

I knew at once that Jesus had done one last act of his divine will in wanting to take the Holy father on his feast of The Divine Mercy . .with all its promises revealed. I believe his cardinals and especially Pope Benedict understood the significance of dates and what Jesus was doing for John Paul. If I am correct and I believe here I am, then His Holiness Benedict 16th well knows the eternal fate of his old friend and mentor. It is not surprising that he has backed a fast track of grace for the memory of his predecessor. We should always recall that The Catholic Church does NOT make saints, only God can do that . .but the Church sometimes is allowed to Recognise a saint by their life and heroic virtues etc or by the revelation of Jesus.

As for the poor in charity that suggest John Paul did not speak out against this or that corruption within the church their arguments are not logical.

We pray for both what we do and what we fail to do but lack of condemnation cannot logically be assessed as agreement. Otherwise these same claimants will surely argue that Our lord does not condemn some of the wrongs of his day for example the sermon on the mount makes no perception on slavery or the economic abuses of social structure of the day. Indeed Our Lord rather backs these economic structures by suggesting that we should render to Caesar what is Caesars . To suggest that this means he cared little or is responsible for the abuse of such structures is clearly absurd and borders on grave sin. We are not allowed to express a view that is harmful or leading to a character assassination of the living or the dead. As Christians such acts are reprehensible and belong to the works of Satan not Christ.

My argument against these supposed catholic thinkers with ideas above their station is that they should always and at all moments remember Love and act accordingly. Salvation is not guaranteed to any of us but it is impossible without love. If we recall the love of Jesus and his followers then we should be inspired to pick up our cross and follow Christ. It is not simply poetical license it is a command from love itself and we must respond.

If the Now Blessed John Paul is in heaven, he is a saint. If Jesus and his divine mercy wish us to follow him then we can be assured that his saints are there to help us and not trip us up or sneer at our weaknesses. As Catholics through out the ages have known, The Communion of Saints means that these individuals in Heaven, in Eternal Glory are our hope and friends. To harden our hearts to Gods Justice, Mercy and Will by turning from The Church or these Holy icons is less than sad. Our personal and eternal salvation are greatly assisted by these saints and by the Holy Catholic Church. What is required of us is a conversion from sin to grace, a child-like acceptance of Gods wonders and an opening to Love that reveals grace in everything we do.

John Paul had human weakness because he was a human but we are not called upon to expose errors nor cast stones because we expect our selves to be so pure in heart. We are called to celebrate the Goodness of this great man and whether we like it or not, to respond to Gods call to Love and accept his Divine Mercy.

Quasi Modo, the Hunchback of Notre Dame, and Divine Mercy Sunday


“Quasimodo”

The Hunchback Of Notre Dame’s tragic main character got his unusual name when as a baby, he was found abandoned and hideously deformed on the steps of Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral, on the 2nd Sunday of Easter.

The Entrance Antiphon for that Mass begins with the Latin words, “Quasi Modo” – “As Newborn Babes”.

Divine Mercy Sunday Celebration May 1st, Our Lady of Peace, Darien, Illinois

Click here for all the details

List of various Chicago Area Divine Mercy Services scheduled for the Sunday after Easter

Complete list (PDF file)

Submitted by Chuck H.

Second Sunday of Easter, Divine Mercy Sunday

divinemercyenh1

With provident pastoral sensitivity and in order to impress deeply on the souls of the faithful these precepts and teachings of the Christian faith, the Supreme Pontiff, John Paul II, moved by the consideration of the Father of Mercy, has willed that the Second Sunday of Easter be dedicated to recalling with special devotion these gifts of grace and gave this Sunday the name, “Divine Mercy Sunday” (Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, Decree Misericors et miserator, 5 May 2000).

The Gospel of the Second Sunday of Easter narrates the wonderful things Christ the Lord accomplished on the day of the Resurrection during his first public appearance: “On the evening of that day, the first day of the week, the doors being shut where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said to them, ‘Peace be with you’. When he said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples were glad to see the Lord. Jesus said to them again, ‘Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you’. And then he breathed on them, and said to them, ‘Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained'” (Jn 20,19-23).
                

Plenary Indulgence
To ensure that the faithful would observe this day with intense devotion, the Supreme Pontiff himself established that this Sunday be enriched by a plenary indulgence, as will be explained below, so that the faithful might receive in great abundance the gift of the consolation of the Holy Spirit. In this way, they can foster a growing love for God and for their neighbour, and after they have obtained God’s pardon, they in turn might be persuaded to show a prompt pardon to their brothers and sisters.
                   
Pardon of others who sin against us
Thus the faithful will more closely conform to the spirit of the Gospel, receiving in their hearts the renewal that the Second Vatican Council explained and introduced: “Mindful of the words of the Lord: ‘By this all men will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another’ (Jn 13,35), Christians can yearn for nothing more ardently than to serve the men of this age with an ever growing generosity and success…. It is the Father’s will that we should recognize Christ our brother in the persons of all men and love them with an effective love, in word and in deed (Pastoral Constitution, Gaudium et spes, n. 93).
                      
Three conditions for the plenary indulgence
And so the Supreme Pontiff, motivated by an ardent desire to foster in Christians this devotion to Divine Mercy as much as possible in the hope of offering great spiritual fruit to the faithful, in the Audience granted on 13 June 2002, to those Responsible for the Apostolic Penitentiary, granted the following Indulgences:

A plenary indulgence, granted under the usual conditions (sacramental confession, Eucharistic communion and prayer for the intentions of Supreme Pontiff) to the faithful who, on the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday, in any church or chapel, in a spirit that is completely detached from the affection for a sin, even a venial sin, take part in the prayers and devotions held in honour of Divine Mercy, or who, in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament exposed or reserved in the tabernacle, recite the Our Father and the Creed, adding a devout prayer to the merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you!”);
                            

A partial indulgence for those who cannot go to church or the seriously ill, granted to the faithful who, at least with a contrite heart, pray to the merciful Lord Jesus a legitimately approved invocation.In addition, sailors working on the vast expanse of the sea; the countless brothers and sisters, whom the disasters of war, political events, local violence and other such causes have been driven out of their homeland; the sick and those who nurse them, and all who for a just cause cannot leave their homes or who carry out an activity for the community which cannot be postponed, may obtain a plenary indulgence on Divine Mercy Sunday, if totally detesting any sin, as has been said before, and with the intention of fulfilling as soon as possible the three usual conditions, will recite the Our Father and the Creed before a devout image of Our Merciful Lord Jesus and, in addition, pray a devout invocation to the Merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. Merciful Jesus, I trust in you).

If it is impossible that people do even this, on the same day they may obtain the Plenary Indulgence if with a spiritual intention they are united with those carrying out the prescribed practice for obtaining the Indulgence in the usual way and offer to the Merciful Lord a prayer and the sufferings of their illness and the difficulties of their lives, with the resolution to accomplish as soon as possible the three conditions prescribed to obtain the plenary indulgence.

Click to read the complete text courtesy of EWTN

Click to read the Diary of St. Faustina

Click here for The Divine Mercy Novena