The gratuitous “secret” of our redemption: Jesus Christ – the “New Adam” – is also the new, divine and perfect Head of all mankind.

Thanks to his finished work on the cross at Calvary, Jesus Christ, eternally enthroned in Heaven at the right hand of God the Father, already personifies the supernatural reality of human perfection …
a state of being which all Christians hope to achieve, according to the power of God’s grace.    

(616 – From the Catechism of the Catholic Church)

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We know this is true because Jesus is not a mythical figure.
Jesus Christ is in fact, a real, well documented, 
historical person.

 Jesus fulfilled every Messianic Bible prophecy, to the letter.

No one else has ever done so. No one else ever will.

Jesus demonstrated the power of God by His perfect, sinless,
earthly existence, by His (truly) charismatic personality,
and by His miracles.

No one else has ever done so. No one else ever will.

Jesus demonstrated His divinity
and His mastery over the power of death
by raising Himself up again from the dead,
just as he said he would.

No one else has ever done so. No one else ever will.

O ye of little faith (here’s a shot in the arm)

Never one to simply collapse under pressure or discouragement I took up the challenge to assemble the Biblical evidence as to Jesus’ Divinity. It is remarkably rich and consistent throughout all the New Testament Books as you shall see. In this article I give the scripture citations for the most part but cannot include most of the texts in the article since they are so numerous that they would eclipse the article itself. Perhaps at some point in the future I will publish a version with all the citations spelled out. For now, let these suffice to show forth a glorious Scriptural affirmation of the Divinity of Our Lord Jesus Christ. He is Lord.

1. Clearly this is a dogma of the Faith (de Fide). The divinity and divine Sonship of Jesus is expressed in all the creeds. This is perhaps most clearly stated in the Athanasian Creed (Quicumque):”…we believe and confess that Our Lord Jesus Christ is the Son of God. He is God and man. He is God begotten of the substance of the Father before all ages and man born in time of the substance of His Mother. He is Perfect God and perfect man.”

2. There are many passages in the Old Testament that express the qualities of the coming Messiah, among them are some very exalted titles:

  • a prophet – (Dt. 18:15,18)
  • a priest – (Psalm 109:4)
  • a shepherd – (Ez 34:23ff)
  • King and Lord – (Ps 2; Ps 44; Ps 109; Zach 9:9)
  • a suffering servant – (Is. 53)
  • the Son of God – (Ps 2:7; 109:3)
  • God with us (Emmanuel) – (Is 7:14; Is 8:8)
  • Wonderful, Counsellor, Mighty God, Father of the world to come, Prince of Peace – (Is 9:6)
  • Eternal King – (Dan 7:14)

Read more

The practical value of signs and sacraments


It was a bit “stuffy” in church, last Sunday. Actually, it was down right hot!

People were fanning themselves with church bulletins, loosening collars, and squirming around in their seats.

The air vents had those short, little, colored ribbons tied to them … the ones that let you “see” when air is actually flowing … and they were all clearly just laying there. Quite limp. At last, one of the ushers got around to turning on the air conditioning.

Almost immediately, those limp little colored ribbons began to stand out and wiggle … and instantly … everybody in the congregation began to feel cooler … even though it would be many long minutes before the temperature would actually begin to drop.

Such is the practical value of  “signs”.


Catholics understand that a sacrament is an outward sign of a divine reality, originally instituted by Jesus Christ, for the primary purpose of  dispensing grace to all the many and varied, People of God.

The sacrament of the Holy Eucharist is particularly important to Catholics, since it’s through the power of that sacrament that Jesus becomes present for us on the altar at Mass, where he serves (among many other things) as High Priest, Perfect Mediator, Savior, God and King.

When we Catholics see Jesus Christ raised up … truly present … in the most holy sacrament of the altar … we instinctively know that God still loves us, that he’s still willing to hold up his “end” of the New Covenant, and that he’ still willing to forgive our sins … saving us from eternal death and hell.

And while it may be a while before all of that truly comes to pass … all the signs are there to indicate that it will indeed, really happen.

With all this in mind, it’s not surprising that the very next thing we do at Mass is claim God the Father as our own, rejoicing and and luxuriating in the Peace obtained through the perfect, atoning sacrifice of our divine brother … Jesus Christ.

The fact that God is then willing to share with us the body, blood, soul and divinity of Jesus … his only begotten son … further confirms what we already know and believe.

God loves us … and he uses practical signs (sacraments) to help confirm for us (and in us) his work of grace, and his timeless message of salvation.

All the more reason to stay cool!

The Fiat, and Mary’s Example of Spiritual Living

The Fiat, and Mary’s Example of Spiritual Living
By Fr. Walter Dziordz, MIC (Dec 7, 2006)

When Gabriel the Archangel tells Our Lady at the Annunciation that by the “power of the Most High,” she is to bear the Son of God and name Him Jesus, Mary surrenders herself completely to the Divine Plan in what is known as the Fiat (Lk 1:38). Fiat means quite simply, “yes.”

Mary’s “yes” leads to the birth of Christianity. Her agreement will touch people’s hearts everywhere. Christians will ponder this encounter. Movies will be made! Other religions will even honor this famous conversation between the Mother of God and the archangel.

I would think that the best way to understand the Blessed Mother’s consent to the Divine Plan of Redemption is to let her teach us how to understand it.

On a basic level, her “yes” serves as an invitation for us to also trust in God and to experience God in deeper ways. Her “yes” is an act of mercy not only because by giving birth to Christ she helped secure a means for our salvation, but also through her example, we learn to draw closer to God.

Before Mary came along, so many people must have felt distant from God. Maybe they wished to draw closer to Him but did not really know how. Perhaps they felt as if they weren’t being “fed” spiritually. This is a common phrase these days, to be “fed.” It’s a good one, and right now I would say that by reflecting on the encounter of the Blessed Mother and the archangel, many people have been “fed” over the centuries and are still being fed by it today.

How so? Because when we hear the Word proclaimed, we can look to Mary and learn from her to keep it and ponder it in our hearts as she did (see Lk 2:19). Out of love for her Father, she welcomed the Word even when she didn’t fully understand it.

After all, the Blessed Mother never claims in Scripture to know it all – that she has it all figured out and that any of her experiences with God can be understood right off the bat. Throughout the Gospels, she continually “ponders all these things in her heart.” She sits on them. She wonders about it all, whatever “it” is in terms of her encounter with God.

Her legacy to us is multi-layered. She gives us her experiences with salvation history, along with her method of processing these experiences. That is to say, she pondered the Word in her heart, so that like a seed it would bear fruit in due time (see Mk 4:20).

As our own Mother, she is teaching us how to live as spiritual adults, in the same way our own earthly mothers would teach us how to live as future earthly adults. The stories of her life have been repeated continually over the centuries precisely so that we can strive to live virtuously to ponder the mysteries of faith in our own hearts.

The Blessed Mother is leaving us an example of how to walk the life of the spirit. She is our model, par excellence, of love, trust, and service. She was the first to believe and the first to be redeemed as the preeminent member of the Church.

And, she teaches us to be thankful to God, even when we don’t always understand His ways. With Mary, that is evidenced by the fact that soon after she says “yes,” she visits her cousin Elizabeth and proclaims what we know now as the “Magnificat,” a wonderful prayer of thanks to God for the wonderful things that He has done for her, which include, most of all, the impending birth to our Savior. Yes, there is some understanding on her part already that is both real and deep. But she is still stepping forward to an unknown future out of trust in God.

Trust, of course, is the very foundation of the message of Divine Mercy. The more we trust in Him, the more He pours His graces out for us. Yet, how many of us truly trust with all our hearts? I see many people who tend to honor some aspect of Church teachings while ignoring others that they don’t completely comprehend. For example, the Church teaches us to confess both sins of commission (what we did that was sinful) and sins of omission (the good things we could have done but didn’t). Isn’t it true that most of us tend to only admit to the former?

As for Mary’s Fiat, we honor this particular experience of hers, listen to priests’ sermons on it, watch this or that TV show or movie, and so on. How many of us take the time to so realize the importance of this occasion that we sit down someplace and ponder it in our own hearts, as Mary did – and often? I believe that by embracing the whole of Church teachings we find true understanding, peace, and the joy of the Christian message. And this is mercy – to open our hands and to receive all of the good gifts that the Lord offers to us.

The Fiat? We know what we already know about it. What we still need to come to terms with, however, is that it is a mystery. But it’s not the kind of mystery that pushes us away (as in “who can comprehend a mystery?”). It’s a Sacred Mystery that is calling out for us all the time, but especially now on Dec. 8, on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, indeed throughout the whole of Advent, culminating on Christmas Day.

All of our liturgical seasons exist for a reason. These “days” are living events. In addition to “celebrating” them, we are called to ponder them, to allow them to take root. We are called to move more deeply into that truth where Mary and the saints live all the time, waiting for us to join them.

Divine Mercy Sunday is the first Sunday after Easter. To learn more about it, and about the Marians of The Immaculate Conception, click the links:

http://www.thedivinemercy.org/

http://www.marian.org/index.php

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