Doctors give unborn boy zero chance of survival before he gives them a ‘true miracle’.

Doctors reminded the couple that any child with Down syndrome and severe heart defects would not survive. Because Amy and Aaron were against abortion, a doctor offered another option – inducing early labor at 28 weeks when the baby would be too young to survive.  But Amy knew that was the same thing as abortion.

The Vawters soon found themselves switching to a Catholic hospital in Spokane, WA because it was closer to family and their support network. The doctors there didn’t once pressure Amy to abort and she says she was very happy with their attitude towards her and her baby.

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Editor’s note: Somebody should send this article to the ACLU – which recently filed a law suit against Catholic hospitals because they do not do abortions – although I doubt they would care to read it.

Catholic teaching on life, death, organ transplantation and other important related issues


kevincubator

A series of related articles at RenewAmerica.com  by Dr. Paul A Byrne, M.D.

Submitted by Mark H.

Does the “character” of an abortionist really matter? O.R. says “YES!”

Whaley was a man who was a failure at life. His lack of character manifested in drug problems, financial woes, adultery, domestic violence, malpractice, and law-breaking. Who would hire such a man except for abortion clinics and shady weight loss schemes? Apparently, no one.

Such is the life of most abortionists. They are a troubled lot prone to broken relationships, sexual dysfunction, domestic violence, drug abuse, and other deviant and criminal behavior. Apologists for the “pro-choice” position hold these people up to be heroes, who nobly aid women in their time of need. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Every day, unsuspecting women who think they are walking into reputable medical offices for “safe and legal” procedures have no idea what lurks behind those abortion clinic doors. Maybe it will be a shoddy, drug addicted abortionist who just sent his previous patient to the hospital. Maybe it will be a crooked abortionist who will overcharge her then bill Medicaid for the balance. Maybe it will be a sexual predator who will have his way with her while she is vulnerable. Maybe it will be all of the above.

If there is any lesson to be learned in the sordid details of Whaley’s life for anyone considering an abortion, it is this: Run. Run as fast and hard and as far away from your local abortion clinic as possible. No matter what Cecile Richards or any of the other abortion apologists may say, you are not safe. The abortion procedure itself may be a relatively simple one, but those who do it are prone to screwing up everything they touch, just like Walker Whaley – or worse.

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If the letters “U” and “N” are in the name, you have good reason to be concerned!

February 13, 2012 (LifeSiteNews.com) – Experts working for the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics at the University of Barcelona, Spain, are calling for a national registry of doctors who will not perform abortions, in order to “improve” women’s access to “pregnancy termination.”

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Editor’s note: It should be remembered that, just prior to WWII, during the Spanish Civil War, the lefties in Spain rounded up and executed thousands, many of them Catholic clergy, for simply disagreeing with their godless, Marxist political ideology. This new registry would make things very easy for them.

One way Catholics (especially Catholic women) can help the bishops

I vow to be a more involved patient. Imagine what would happen if every Catholic woman demanded that every doctor in every Catholic hospital cease and desist immediately from dispensing contraception? They’d listen to us. This is the time to help the bishops, ladies.

Will you join me?

Read more from Stacy Trasancos at Catholic Lane

Doctors shocked at good outcome after diagnosis of serious birth defect

When Jennifer Mckinstry was pregnant with her third child Colton, he was diagnosed with hydrocephalus. She and her husband were devastated and their doctors provided little to no support.

“We were told that we should terminate our pregnancy with Colton seven times,” explains Mckinstry, “and by three different doctors. The first time they told us to terminate the pregnancy was the hardest because it was all such a shock to us. The doctor was trying to tell me about his brain disorder and I couldn’t even hear him, everything was blurry and I felt so light headed. About a week later, we went to another doctor …and he told us that it would be best to terminate the pregnancy and that Colton wouldn’t make it. If he did make it, he would be a ‘vegetable’ who would never laugh or smile. After the second time that they told us to terminate we came back home and were so unsure of what to do. I never thought I would even think about terminating a pregnancy at all, but with everything the doctors were telling us, I wondered if it would be best. For three days, my husband and I thought back and forth if we should terminate or not. It was the most stressful and depressing days of my life. We decided that the best thing we could do was put it in God’s hands and pray, and whatever happened was meant to be. I just couldn’t think that God put Colton in our lives just to have him terminated. He was put here for a reason. The next month we were told a few more times to terminate the pregnancy because it would be best for Colton, and that it was selfish of us to keep him because he would be in so much pain if he even did make it. Well I am proud to say that Colton did make it through the pregnancy and when he was born was breathing on his own. He did need surgery to help drain extra fluid in his brain, but he is five months old now and is smiling, laughing, nursing, and meeting close to ever milestone for his age! The doctors are shocked and keeping telling us that he is doing amazingly well and way better than even the best case scenario they ever thought!”

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Bitter memories of a long-past abortion

My own story – more accurately a story involving two people, but told from my own perspective – begins in an evening in early September 1967, when my girlfriend of a few months meets me off a train at Glasgow Central. She has something she needs to tell me. We cross the street to a pub, the Corn Exchange, where over half-pints of beer I learn that she’s pregnant. How do I react to the news? Am I comforting, cold, or just scared and confused? I have no idea, but a few days later I or we decide that we should be married. We write letters to our parents – hers live in Northern Ireland and mine in Fife. My letter is written in the Mitchell library – all these years later I can still see the desk and the notepaper – but what it says I have again no idea (though I imagine its tone to be chipper, which was my 22-year-old style).

Somehow this plan changes, perhaps because my girlfriend senses that I’m not too keen. Perhaps she isn’t either. A friend of hers who’s had an abortion comes round to the flat with her husband and tells us about the possibilities. Aside from the towels and hot water, we’ll need to have a “good [coal] fire going” so as to dispose of the remains.

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