Randy Engel’s Old Time Religion Prescription, for Catholics

… let us continue to do all that is necessary for our own salvation and for those entrusted to our care. We need to be soldiers of Christ and for Christ. Cradle Catholics like me know the holy drill well enough, at least in part, but it nevertheless bears repeating.

Following the four divisions of the doctrines of salvation found in The Catechism of the Council of Trent: the Apostles Creed (what we are to believe); the Sacraments (the instruments of grace); the Ten Commandments (what we must do); and the Lord’s Prayer (whatever can be the object of the Christian’s desires, or hopes, or prayers), let us strive to:

  • Love God with our whole heart, our whole soul, our whole mind, and with our whole strength, and our neighbor as thyself.
  • Live the spiritual life according to our state in life.
  • Be modest in speech, dress and demeanor as is befitting a child of God
  • Keep custody of our eyes; avoid the near occasions of sin.
  • Keep ourselves in the state of grace.
  • Attend the Traditional Mass.
  • Frequent the Sacraments especially that of Penance and the Holy Communion.
  • Bring the body under subjugation by fasting, acts of penance, and the offering up of sufferings in reparation for thy sins and those of the world.
  • Read Holy Scripture; set time apart for daily meditation and recitation of the Rosary, before the Blessed Sacrament when possible.
  • Cultivate a special devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Attend First Friday and First Saturday Masses.
  • Pray for the Poor Souls in Purgatory and unbaptized children in Limbo.
  • Pray to our Guardian Angel and to our patron saint (s) daily.
  • Make generous use of Sacramentals especially the Brown Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.
  • Pray for our enemies recalling the words of Saint Thomas More written in the Tower of London, 1534: “To think my most enemies my best friends, for the brethren of Joseph could never have done him so much good with their love and favor as they did him with their malice and hatred.”
  • Give Glory to the One Triune God — Father, Son and Holy Ghost — always and everywhere.

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How’s that “New Springtime” of the Catholic Church working out for you?

While attempting to survive the current arctic winter once hailed as the New Springtime of Vatican II, there is a nagging temptation to quip through chattering teeth —Yep, we told you so! It’s not the right attitude, of course, but perhaps understandable. After all, Traditional Catholics spent over four decades in virtual exile at the hands of their modernist-appeasing coreligionists who rigorously defended the indefensible—the very regime of novelty responsible for the Church’s current auto-demolition.

Clearly, Modernism’s chickens have come home to roost, exactly as the “schismatics”—e.g., Walter Matt, Michael Davies, Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre—predicted they would. And lest there be any doubt in anyone’s mind, the majority of the New Springtime’s fundamentally emasculated clergy are no match for belligerents of any sort—even chickens.

Far too many of them pounded their ecclesial swords into flatware for fancy ecumenical dinner parties long ago. They laid their crowns at the feet of their enemies, and excised from their lexicons any dogmatic words that might offend the infidel. They protestantized their liturgy, stripped exorcisms from their Sacraments, and began behaving as if Hell and demons no longer exist.  The joke was on them, however, since the playing field they so expertly leveled has since been overrun by demons that not only exist but are hell-bent on taking over Christendom and lynching churchmen of every stripe.

With empty scabbards and heads uncrowned, our princes can scarcely command obedience from aging priests and nuns much less crusaders for whose noble legacy they’ve been apologizing ad nauseam for decades. Open dialogue paved the way for open season on all things Catholic, including popes, and there are few Catholics left standing who are willing or able to defend the holy city or the hollow men inside.

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What We Have Lost: 5-Part Video Series On the Post-Vatican II Catholic Church

Five Part Video Series that’s well worth watching:

Wow! One hundred forty-eight Signatories agree on some very important Christian stuff.


Christians are heirs of a 2,000-year tradition of proclaiming God’s word, seeking justice in our societies, resisting tyranny, and reaching out with compassion to the poor, oppressed and suffering.

While fully acknowledging the imperfections and shortcomings of Christian institutions and communities in all ages, we claim the heritage of those Christians who defended innocent life by rescuing discarded babies from trash heaps in Roman cities and publicly denouncing the Empire’s sanctioning of infanticide. We remember with reverence those believers who sacrificed their lives by remaining in Roman cities to tend the sick and dying during the plagues, and who died bravely in the coliseums rather than deny their Lord.

After the barbarian tribes overran Europe, Christian monasteries preserved not only the Bible but also the literature and art of Western culture. It was Christians who combated the evil of slavery: Papal edicts in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries decried the practice of slavery and first excommunicated anyone involved in the slave trade; evangelical Christians in England, led by John Wesley and William Wilberforce, put an end to the slave trade in that country. Christians under Wilberforce’s leadership also formed hundreds of societies for helping the poor, the imprisoned, and child laborers chained to machines.

In Europe, Christians challenged the divine claims of kings and successfully fought to establish the rule of law and balance of governmental powers, which made modern democracy possible. And in America, Christian women stood at the vanguard of the suffrage movement. The great civil rights crusades of the 1950s and 60s were led by Christians claiming the Scriptures and asserting the glory of the image of God in every human being regardless of race, religion, age or class.

This same devotion to human dignity has led Christians in the last decade to work to end the dehumanizing scourge of human trafficking and sexual slavery, bring compassionate care to AIDS sufferers in Africa, and assist in a myriad of other human rights causes—from providing clean water in developing nations to providing homes for tens of thousands of children orphaned by war, disease and gender discrimination.

Like those who have gone before us in the faith, Christians today are called to proclaim the Gospel of costly grace, to protect the intrinsic dignity of the human person and to stand for the common good. In being true to its own calling, the call to discipleship, the church through service to others can make a profound contribution to the public good.

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