Gregg Cunningham of the Center for Bioethical Reform: “Two things that have to happen in order for the pro-life movement to be effective, and they aren’t happening anywhere in the world in any systematic way”.

First, and prior to making gains in legislation, “the population has to be convinced of the humanity of the unborn child, early in pregnancy. And the population has to be convinced of the inhumanity of abortion, early in pregnancy.”

He pointed out that the gains made in public opinion have been in support for abortion restrictions only in later stages of gestation, when abortion is already much less common. Most US and British opinion still favours largely unrestricted abortion in the first trimester, when the great majority of abortions are conducted.

“Most people hear the word ‘embryo’ and in their minds that term is synonymous with ‘blob of tissue’ or ‘blob of cells’. And they see abortion perhaps as evil but as the ‘lesser of two evils’ at worst. Certainly not evil enough to justify putting anyone in prison who performs abortions.”

“Nothing is going to change until we persuade the population that the baby really is entitled to developmental rights of personhood from the moment of fertilisation. And that abortion is an evil of sufficient enormity to justify criminalising the act. By which I don’t mean putting women in prison, I mean putting doctors in prison,” he continued.

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What “success” looks like

When my kids are grown, it won’t really matter if they got an A or a B in 7th grade history. It won’t really matter how far they can hit a baseball. It won’t really even matter much if they’ve made a lot of money or been “successful” according to the world. What will matter much more is this:

12 Most Important Metrics for your Child’s (and your) Education

A prayer that’s almost too practical

The Dynamic Catholic Prayer

Loving Father,
I invite you into my life today
and make myself available to you.
Help me to become the-best-version-of-myself
by seeking your will and becoming a living example
of your love in the world.
Open my heart to the areas of my life that need to change
in order for me to carry out the mission
and experience the joy you have imagined for my life.
Inspire me to live the Catholic faith in ways that are
dynamic and engaging.
Show me how to best get involved in the life of my parish.
Make our community hungry for best practices
and continuous learning.
Give me courage when I am afraid,
hope when I am discouraged,
and clarity in times of decision.
Teach me to enjoy uncertainty and lead your Church
to become all you imagined it would be
for the people of our times.
Amen.

Source: DynamicCatholic.com
Confessions Of A Mega Church Pastor Study Guide (Download)

MSNBC, Barack Obama and the Teacher’s Unions think you’re too stupid to raise your own children, so they’re planning to take over.

nofamily

“…The idea behind this is going to be so appealing to so many people.  So many people are going to say, ‘I love that.’  Because I’m freaked out.  I don’t know what to do with my kids…  They’re unruly.  They’re whatever.  I don’t know what to do. And so the State will relieve you of that.

And I think that there’s a good 20 to 30% of America, maybe even higher now, I’m not sure, [that] will gladly have the State take that over so they don’t have to worry about it.  Yet another one of your responsibilities taken from you — I’m sorry. Another one of your responsibilities that you will gladly hand over because you don’t know what to do.  And so they will do it for you: Don’t worry! We’ll raise your kids.  We’ll train your kids.  We’ll educate your kids because it’s working out so well…  [Emphasis added]

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From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

1881 Each community is defined by its purpose and consequently obeys specific rules; but “the human person . . . is and ought to be the principle, the subject and the end of all social institutions.”4

1882 Certain societies, such as the family and the state, correspond more directly to the nature of man; they are necessary to him. To promote the participation of the greatest number in the life of a society, the creation of voluntary associations and institutions must be encouraged “on both national and international levels, which relate to economic and social goals, to cultural and recreational activities, to sport, to various professions, and to political affairs.”5 This “socialization” also expresses the natural tendency for human beings to associate with one another for the sake of attaining objectives that exceed individual capacities. It develops the qualities of the person, especially the sense of initiative and responsibility, and helps guarantee his rights.6

1883 Socialization also presents dangers. Excessive intervention by the state can threaten personal freedom and initiative. The teaching of the Church has elaborated the principle of subsidiarity, according to which “a community of a higher order should not interfere in the internal life of a community of a lower order, depriving the latter of its functions, but rather should support it in case of need and help to co- ordinate its activity with the activities of the rest of society, always with a view to the common good.”7

1884 God has not willed to reserve to himself all exercise of power. He entrusts to every creature the functions it is capable of performing, according to the capacities of its own nature. This mode of governance ought to be followed in social life. The way God acts in governing the world, which bears witness to such great regard for human freedom, should inspire the wisdom of those who govern human communities. They should behave as ministers of divine providence.

1885 The principle of subsidiarity is opposed to all forms of collectivism. It sets limits for state intervention. It aims at harmonizing the relationships between individuals and societies. It tends toward the establishment of true international order.

So Just Where is that Epistle to the Children?

When the apostles started out, they knew they had work to do. The whole world needed conversion. Everyone was pagan. That is, the world looked very much like it does today. The apostolic approach to the problem differed from ours.

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Peter, for instance, did not set up a single parochial school. Luke did not write a children’s gospel. Not one of Paul’s epistles were decorated with yellow duckies. In short, according to the Scriptures and Church history, the apostles didn’t bother teaching children the Faith. They taught only the adults. Why?

Because the apostles understood the principle of subsidiarity. Pope Pius XI in his 1931 encyclicalQuadragesimo Anno described the principle succinctly: “Just as it is gravely wrong to take from individuals what they can accomplish by their own initiative and industry and give it to the community, so also it is an injustice and at the same time a grave evil and disturbance of right order to assign to a greater and higher association what lesser and subordinate organizations can do. For every social activity ought of its very nature to furnish help to the members of the body social, and never destroy and absorb them.”

The apostles knew they could not replace parents. Through the sacrament of marriage, God endows parents with the ability to teach their own children about Him. The apostles only needed to teach the parents the Faith, it was the parents’ responsibility to teach their own children. So, what has changed in the last two millenia? The answer to that is simple. Nothing.

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If Catholic schools were factories, the end product would be lukewarm Catholics.

help

A “theologically orthodox”
Catholic school teacher sounds off

I could recount many nightmarish stories of how most of the Catholic school educators and administrators I have encountered have been men and women of little or no faith in Christ and Church. Even in the religion departments it is common to encounter ex-nuns who feel the Church is in sin because they can’t be priests, homosexual men who are more interested in defending the lifestyle than in teaching the straight Catholic faith, and a range of those who are in dissent on some or another important Catholic doctrine.

If there are problems of personnel inside the Religion departments, the other disciplines are almost completely immersed in doing exactly what they would be doing in a public school. I have often wondered what small percentage of Catholic high school teachers actually like the Catholic Church? It is obvious that in hiring these folks, the biggest unspoken question is not “Are you enthusiastic about your Catholic faith?” but “Can you tolerate pretending to be on board with the Catholic stuff you will encounter from time to time here?”

There’s lots more

Editor’s note: Be sure to see the reader comments … all of them.

The egalitarian ideology of our time cuts the human heart and soul out of the profession of the teacher.

Forty years ago, a few wise men at the college where I teach, motivated both by that acknowledgment of authority and by their belief in the ontological equality of all mankind, embarked on a brave reform.

At the time when the elite colleges were scrapping their curricula, effectively burning the books of three thousand years of our Western heritage, our faculty dedicated themselves to something beyond themselves, deserving of their honor. What if the elites at Harvard no longer honored and studied Dante? The students at our college would do so—the children of ordinary people, not rich, and perhaps not destined for riches, either.

What if the technicians of education no longer saw any use for the political wisdom of Aristotle and Plato? The faculty at our school, not exalted technicians with conveniently reductive equations, but rather human beings asking the human questions, would try to recover and hand on something of their wisdom.

They welcomed those young people with equal heartiness into a world of glorious inequality. I cannot say we have always succeeded at the task. But it has at least been a human enterprise. And that is more than I can say for most of what goes on in the egalitarian prison house that goes by the name of “school.”

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Father Michael J. McGivney Center of Hope and Healing Opens Its Doors

On August 14th, The Well of Mercy, a Father Michael J. McGivney Center of Hope and Healing, opened its’ doors to single pregnant women who choose life. Five mothers, three of which will give birth in the next 3 weeks, now have a home. We are a much needed extension of the Pregnancy Assistance Centers by providing transitional housing.

The Chicago center is the first of six Fr. Michael J. McGivney Centers of Hope and Healing to be established. Our goal is to open a center in each of the six dioceses in the State of Illinois. The Center is named after the founder of the Knights of Columbus, the Venerable Father Michael J. McGivney.

On Sunday, September 23, we will have an open house and you are invited to visit our new home between the hours of noon and 4:00 PM. We are located at 6339 N. Fairfield Ave, Chicago. We have much to do to clean and renovate the facility and you may decide, after visiting, that you want to help us. Your time and talents are essential in the support of this mission. Visit us on September 23rd, see for yourself, The Holy Spirit may tap you on the shoulder and you may decide you want to help get involved and share in the joy of this new Catholic initiative. For more information visit us at www.mcgivneycenter.com or call us at (773) 889‐6470.

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Common sense Catholic family education

“Religious education” can sound intimidating and far worse is “catechesis.” Neither term came to mind as I washed some dishes in the sink and my 6-year-old grandson wandered into the kitchen. He’s used to the fact I tend to whistle, hum or sing absentmindedly, unaware I’m making any noise at all.

“I know that song!” he said, interrupting me mid-whistle. “We have it at church.”

Hmmm . . .  I wasn’t aware of what I was whistling. Since I presumed his parish Mass didn’t feature anything by Creedence Clearwater Revival or show tunes, then it was . . . Of course. “O Come, O Come Emmanuel.”

My grandson was pleased he recognized the melody. I was happy he was going someplace where it was sung – religiously.

That’s part of the ABCs, too. We leave Mass, we’re sent, but we take something with us. And we share it. That Advent song — whistled in a kitchen — led easily to a short conversation about Mass, Advent and . . . naturally . . . Christmas.

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Moral of the story: If the candidate advocates slaughtering babies, DON’T VOTE FOR HIM!

So in the wake of it all, what has been the result? What has been the consequence of thousands upon thousands of self-professed pro-life and pro-marriage Catholics and Evangelicals who voted for Barack Obama? Well, was it day one or two that he reversed the Mexico City policy thus allowing taxpayer money to go overseas to help fund organizations that provide abortions?

Yes, as soon as our new President come into the Oval Office, he took direct action to expand abortion across the world. Of course he also got rid of the bust of Winston Churchill, that megalomaniac of a colonialist. Such a visage ought not shadow any corner of the Oval Office…which I guess doesn’t have any corners, does it. But certainly the message was: Winston Churchill is out for being a colonialist and your money for abortions in Africa is in? That’s okay.

Despite the growing unemployment, the crashing of the housing market, the financial malfeasance of large firms, and the collapse of too-big-to-fail companies like GM, the first order of business was, naturally, healthcare reform. And despite long and detailed objections to the process and the content of the reform, the White House strong-armed Democratic Representatives and Senators to get it passed. Now we are discovering just how damaged the bill is. Indeed, just yesterday it was reported that Howard Dean, not exactly a conservative fellow you know, admitted that the healthcare bill will likely force about a third of small businesses to drop their insurance plans for employees. The effect? The estimated cost of the bill will now be adjusted by…oh… 1 trillion dollars (somewhere in God’s mind my grandchildren are screaming).

Protesting the decision by Barack Obama to cut funding to the D.C. Voucher program that helps mostly poor, African American children.

On the education front, one of the tried and true marks of a social justice President, the Commander and Chief decided that impoverished and predominantly black children ought not have access to the best education in the District of Columbia and so ended the Opportunity Scholarship voucher system that made it possible. The support of teachers unions is more important than kids’ education after all. The decision, by the way, was condemned by liberals and conservatives at the time but the Democratic Senate still refused to fund it in 2010. It has taken a Republican House to secure funding.

On marriage? Well, back when the Defense of Marriage Act or DOMA was being argued, conservatives in support of gay “marriage” stated that a Constitutional Amendment against such arrangements were not necessary since DOMA was in place. That is all we needed to make sure that no federal law could force a State government to recognize something on which the people didn’t decide. Who knew, then, that a Democratic President could, contrary to the oath he swore, just decide not to enforce DOMA? Well, some conservatives knew it, which is why they sought the Amendment. Since February of this year the Obama Administration has refused to defend the Constitutionality of the law.

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Teachers at Catholic schools ill-prepared for their jobs, says president of Catholic Education Institute

Catholic schools aren’t Catholic enough and are failing in their mission because teachers are not adequately prepared for their special role, the president of the Catholic Education Institute told attendees at a recent three-day conference at Marin Catholic High School.

“For teachers preparing to work in Catholic elementary or high schools, most [Catholic colleges and universities] offer little that is specifically Catholic,” Jesuit Fr. John Piderit told participants at the second annual ‘Substantially Catholic’ conference at Marin Catholic, the archdiocesan newspaper Catholic San Francisco reports.

“‘Why is this important for administrators?” asked Father Piderit’s colleague Melanie Morey, senior director of research at the institute,” continued the Catholic San Francisco story. ‘Every year you bring young faculty into your schools’ and they are by and large unprepared to teach specifically as Catholics, she said.”

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The commencement speech President Obama should have delivered at Notre Dame

By Laurie Higgins, DSA Director –Illinois Family Institute

I can think of no more fitting way to conclude the school year than with excerpts from the retirement speech delivered by retiring Glenbrook North High School social studies teacher, James McPherrin, who is retiring after 33 years of teaching.

The words he expressed put to shame countless commencement speeches by celebrities who have little to offer students other than pedestrian cliches. It would behoove administrators, faculty, and students to hear Mr. McPherrin’s speech at the start and end of every school year.

Mr. McPherrin offers wisdom and erudition through eloquent prose that points those who have ears to hear toward truth:

St. Thomas More, the intrepid 16th century chancellor to King Henry VIII of England, once said, “When statesmen forsake their own private consciences for the sake of their public duties, they lead their country by a short route to chaos.” Now, I would suggest that the very same quotation might be tailored so as to apply directly to teachers. It would read, “When teachers forsake their own private consciences for the sake of their public school duties, they lead their students by a short route to chaos.”

Thomas More was among the sterling individuals in the western intellectual tradition who understood well the necessary relationship between the natural law and the human law, and that circumstances often challenge us to acknowledge the rational demands the former places upon the latter. More, as we know, would later sacrifice his very life in defense of that compelling idea. In essence, dear colleagues, please consider that our cardinal duty as instructors of the young is to shepherd them in their journey towards truth.

Whether it be European History, English Lit, Calc, Phys Ed, or Music, our task is to foster in students a love for and desire to acknowledge what is true. If such a premise does not inspire our efforts, then I’m afraid they might well be for naught. Make it your purpose to ignite the element of intellectual longing that exists in all young people; that desire to know, that desire to bring order out of chaos. Give them that education to which the English writer, G.K. Chesterton, alluded, when he said, “Many are schooled, but few are educated.” There is a difference, and it would behoove us all to acknowledge it openly.

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San Francisco Archdiocese finds making couples needlessly “jump through hoops” not conducive to church weddings

“There is a concern across the board from our priests, not just about the number of marriages, but as to the quality of marriage preparation — that has to be revisited,” said Msgr. James Tarantino, vicar for administration and moderator of the curia for the archdiocese.

Marriage preparation should be more welcoming to couples, he said. In addition, the decline in the number of church weddings “points to a deeper issue of people not being as well educated as to what a sacramental marriage means and how that is important in helping a marriage,” he said.

The drop in sacramental marriages in the archdiocese mirrors national trends. About 72 percent of all U.S adults were married in 1960 but by 2008 the figure was down to 52 percent, according to a 2010 Pew Research Institute report, “The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families.”

Msgr. Tarantino said a rise in cohabitation and rejection of the idea of traditional church weddings are factors in the drop. “Another factor is the way our system of marriage preparation works or doesn’t work. Sometimes it is not as conducive as it might be in showing hospitality and welcoming people to marry in church,” he said.

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Editor’s note: Why do we need popes and bishops … when we have the impeccable Pew Research and John Jay folks, on which to rely … for the best advice that money can buy?

Cigarette taxes going up again. Maybe it’s time for a “gay” tax!

For many, many years our government has taken a schizophrenic approach to public health. It seems certain behaviors in American culture are officially disfavored while others are protected. For instance, public health officials have long waged war on smoking and illicit drug use, but little is said about alcohol beyond discouraging drunk driving.

Homosexual behavior, an act associated with 72% of new male AIDS cases? Oh, well that’s completely different. Unlike smoking, homosexuality is a politically favored behavior, one that public health and other government officials pretend is normal, natural and healthy even though numerous public health sources (including the Centers for Disease Control) have published data for years that show a vastly elevated risk among the homosexual community for AIDS transmission, syphilis, gonorrhea, Herpes, HPV, hepatitis, anal cancer, depression, anxiety, substance abuse, suicide and domestic violence.

If smoking were half as dangerous as homosexual behavior, we would have outlawed it decades ago. Yet because homosexual behavior has become a politically protected behavior in the wake of aggressive activist protests, we attempt to accomplish a sort of mental juggling act that always keeps the consequences of the behavior in a separate hand from the behavior itself. As long as we can keep pretending that the consequences and the actions have no connection, we can keep feeling good about this behavior…and keep the vociferous activists placated and off our backs, right?

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The Catholic (School) Difference

In 2004 President George W. Bush spoke to Catholic Educators in Washington D.C. for the centennial celebration of the National Catholic Education Association.  He described Catholic education as a “noble calling” and praised our schools as “models for all schools around the country.”  He stated, “Catholic schools have a proven record of bringing out the best in every child, regardless of their background. And every school in America should live up to that standard.”

The United States Department of Education reported that Catholic School students are consistently high in reading, math, and science skills, and are especially effective in educating minority and low-income students.  Ninety-nine percent of Catholic secondary school students graduate, and 97% go on to post-secondary education.

During last year’s Catholic Schools Week, Bishop Paul Zipfel spoke of the value of a Catholic education during a Mass at our high school.  He explained that it is about so much more than just academic records.  “Research also shows that graduates of Catholic schools are more closely bonded to the Church, more deeply committed to adult religious practices, have better images of God, and exhibit a greater awareness of the responsibilities for moral decision making,” he stated.  “Although it never replaces the primary education that must take place in the home, it is one of the best investments we can make in the future faith of our children.”

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Liberal women are the active, driving force behind hatred of Sarah Palin

Why does their hatred of her burn so hot?

Ask them, and they’ll most likely tell you: Because she’s a moron. But that is obviously false. To be sure, her skills at extemporaneous speaking leave much to be desired. But that can be said of a good many politicians on both sides of the aisle, including George W. Bush, John Kerry and, yes, Barack Obama. And don’t get us started on the man who defeated her for the vice presidency.

She drives them crazy.

Whether or not she is presidential timber–and we are inclined to think that she is not–there is no denying that she is a highly accomplished person. She is also a highly accomplished woman, what in an earlier age would have been called a feminist pioneer: the first female governor of the malest state in the country, the first woman on the presidential ticket of the party on the male side of the “gender gap.” Having left politics, whether temporarily or permanently, she has established herself as one of the most consequential voices in the political media.

They say she is uneducated. What they mean is that her education is not elite–not Harvard or Yale, or even Michigan or UCLA. They resent her because, in their view, she has risen above her station.

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Disclaimer for Catholics Coming Home: “Home” has changed a bit, since you left.


The Catholics Come Home TV advertising campaign is beautifully done, invoking imagery and concepts that Catholics have held near and dear, for some 2000 years.

Unfortunately, as is often the case in the advertising business, the reality is sometimes, far from the ideal.

Many/most Catholic churches look nothing like the ones in the Catholics Come Home commercials. Today’s Catholic churches often have much more in common with the architecture used in gymnasiums and/or civic meeting rooms.

Sacred art and statuary is also often similarly sparse and sterile. For example: Chicago’s Holy Name Cathedral looks much more like a typical Presbyterian church, than a Catholic one.

Many/most Catholic parishes are short-staffed, lacking funds, and ill prepared to handle any increased “work” load. Little training has been done … other than perhaps, prepping one selected deacon to deal with the “massive influx” of returning Catholics (2-6 inquiries expected, per parish, per campaign.) And of course, convenient parking is already in very short supply.

Then there’s the “backlash” to be expected from already practicing Catholics … like in the story of the Prodigal Son … where the faithful one got ticked off about all the attention that was being lavished on his (now returned) wayward brother. (“I never went away and squandered my birth right. Where’s MY fatted calf?!”)

And let’s not forget the dismal spiritual “formation” of just about everyone … who in the finest, dumbed-down, post-Vatican II liberal tradition, received little or no real education in the authentic Catholic faith, other than “God is Love. Please place the money in the collection basket. Then leave quickly and quietly, after the Mass has ended.”

Truth be told … for these and various other reasons … many parishes are hoping that you might choose to “come home” someplace else!

But let’s not dwell on the negative. The upside potential of this campaign is huge!

For example:

Reverts and converts have not (yet) been conditioned to accept the status quo. 

Many actually believe what they learned about the Catholic Church way back in the 1950’s and early 60’s. They still think of the church as unique and special … not just one of many paths to God. (And of course, they would be precisely right!)

Many secretly crave the “smells and bells” of Catholic worship … even if they don’t fully realize it. At the very least, they are impressed (in some deep, essential way) by the dignity of the ministerial priesthood, the vestments, the crucifix, the centrality and practicality of the holy altar, the candles, incense, hymns and prayers. The Catholic Church (officially, at least) is still fully committed to all these things … and that’s good.

Sacraments are essential to the Catholic faith, and the Church (generally) still “does” sacraments very well. Let’s not dwell on the fact that the majority of today’s Catholics no longer understand who or precisely what they are receiving … or why. Let’s just stress the fact that sacraments … particularly Reconciliation and Holy Communion … typically accomplish exactly what God intends for us … personal sanctification and transformation, through his superabundant grace … and that is a really, really good thing … for everybody!

Newcomers and reverts are also typically more zealous for the faith than the average Catholic. This holds out a genuine hope for renewal … particularly in the area of Catholic organizations, Catholic education, and priestly vocations … as well as in general parish life … as even the most jaded cleric might be inspired by the urgent inquiries and sincere requests of souls who are truly “On Fire” for Jesus and the Catholic faith.

So … in spite of the negatives … Catholics Come Home really can’t miss. But let’s not fool ourselves … or our intended audience … because fibbing … even when attempting to promote the Catholic Church … is still a sin!

Catholics Come Home official site

Request a (free) Catholic Resource CD containing over 700 megabytes of the best Catholic stuff ever produced, including the Bible, the Catechism, beautifully illustrated presentations on the Mass, the Passion of Jesus Christ, the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Original Christmas Story, and much, much more. Supplies are limited.

News of Catholic school closing was met with a totally unexpected response

Multiple parishioners approached Donoghue and Father Stack, arguing that what the parish needed was a more rigorous curriculum and authentic Catholic spirit. One of the loudest of these voices was that of Michael Hanby, a professor at the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family. Hanby had lately been introduced to a local homeschooling community’s miniature school, known as the Crittenden Academy, which had inspired him to write an essay describing his philosophy on the subject. That November evening, attending the consultation and listening to the parish’s presentation, he recalls thinking, “I’m not sure that the school they just described is really worth saving.”

Following the meeting, Hanby sent a letter saying as much to Father Stack, including a copy of his essay on education and emphasizing that “a wonderful birthright [was] being denied” the children of the community. Students needed, he argued, “to love thinking and to have something noble to think about,” but Catholic schools had instead “drifted toward a public school model.” His essay, Donoghue recalls, presented “a good analysis of where Catholic education had gotten off track,” and she was impressed with its proposed remedies.

What was most amazing, though, was that it was a “beautiful fit” with a change she and Father Stack had already been contemplating since they’d attended a leadership consortium two weeks before the call from downtown: a school where rigorous curriculum was combined with authentic Catholicism without apology. “It was already clear,” Donoghue explains, “that [the old] model had run out of steam.” Hanby’s vision for education — along with other essays they read, including Dorothy Sayers’ “Lost Tools of Learning” — articulated a methodology for their goals “more fully and more completely” than she and Father Stack could do themselves.

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My, how things have changed!

Now only a fond memory?

Seen at Matt C. Abbot’s column

Submitted by Marcia Darnell:

There was a wonderful nun who touched my soul when I was growing up. Her name was Sister Rosamonde and she was my teacher for several years in Plymouth, Mass., at the Sacred Heart School there. I also attended the same school at a different branch in Orleans on Cape Cod. This was the only time in my life I could not wait to get up and go to school; I was saddened when holidays and weekends came around and it was not a school day. These were the happiest days of my life. We went to First Friday Mass, were taught from the Baltimore Catechism, and our lives were rich with the stories of the saints and true miraculous events known to the sisters. We had dancing classes, music classes and even were taught a foreign language starting in the fourth grade. The nuns would take us to their property in Kingston, where they later relocated the school, for outings to make ice cream and run in the fields and play games.

I wanted the same wonderful experience for my children but that was not to be. My only option was to homeschool in New Jersey so they could learn the Faith. However, at the time, I even urged my husband to find a job near Kingston, Mass., so my girls could have the same education with the same wonderful nuns 40 years after I left.

Then I met a woman who had relocated to our state who told me her son was resentful that his parents removed him from Sacred Heart School in Kingston and moved to New Jersey. So she hosted the Sisters of Divine Providence at her home because she loved these nuns and missed them, too. Her phone call after their visit extinguished my desire to move back there to be near the school. She said they had changed — that some transformation happened over the late 1980s and early 1990s. They had become ‘progressives.’ I was comforted to hear from her that my own special nun was viewed as the only one who seemed to have escaped the metamorphosis. Now, after reading your column, I realize the Lord spared us from a fruitless move.

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Homeschooled students outperform their peers in college, study concludes.


PURCELLVILLE, Va., Aug. 3 /Christian Newswire/ —
Last week, a study titled Exploring Academic Outcomes of Homeschooled Students was released and showed that homeschooled college students significantly outperformed their peers.

“This is great news for the homeschool community,” said Michael Smith, president of the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA). “Once again, homeschooling parents have shown they are more than capable of preparing their children for all aspects of life.”

The study covered homeschoolers from 2004-2009 at a mid-sized college in the upper Midwest. Among the major findings:

Homeschooled students earned a higher first-year GPA (3.41) when compared to other freshman (3.12).

Homeschooled students earned a higher fourth-year GPA (3.46) when compared to other freshman who completed their fourth year (3.16).

Homeschooled students achieved a higher graduation rate (66.7 percent) when compared to the overall student population (57.5 percent).

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