The end of the world has already happened. It’s just not what you think.

apocalypse

The end of the world has indeed happened. It did not happen on a specific day, but has spread out over several decades. The world that disappeared was a world where most children knew how to read and write. A world where we admired the heroes rather than the victims. A world where political machines had not turned into the soul grinding machines. A world where we had more role models than rights. A world where one could understand what Pascal had meant when he wrote that entertainments distracted us from living a real human life. A world where the borders safeguarded those who lived their way of life and a life of their own.

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“I don’t know where we went wrong other than that we obviously don’t understand the Scriptures in the way that we should.”

I had profiled several believers before May 21. The day after, most didn’t answer the phone. Those who did wouldn’t talk on the record. But one man, his voice quavering, said he was still holding out hope that they were one day off. Another believer asserted that their prayers worked: God delayed judgment so that more people could be saved, but the end is “imminent.”

Tom Evans was contrite. Evans is on the board of Family Radio, the organization led by Harold Camping, who calculated and promoted the May 21 date.

“I don’t know where we went wrong other than that we obviously don’t understand the Scriptures in the way that we should,” he says.

It’s very hard for us to say, ‘Boy, was I stupid!’ The more committed a person is to their prophecy, the more likely they are to justify that action, and to try to convince people that their belief was in some way right or good. – Elliot Aronson, psychologist

Camping has yet to make a statement, but Evans hopes they will not recalculate and announce a new date for Judgment Day. After all, they’ve done that at least once before — in 1994 — and he believes they’ve learned a lesson.

Link

Two Catholic end of the world scenarios – date uncertain – your mileage may vary.

End Times

A Catholic Look At the AntiChrist

Editor’s note: Odds are … when the appointed time for the actual end time events arrives, things will indeed come upon us like “a thief in the night” … with all of the prophesied events happening one after the other, in rapid sequence … much as hundreds of Messianic prophesies were fulfilled in the short span of time between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday.

An example (from history) of how these things work can be seen here.

Freedom of religion also includes the freedom to be wrong.

“My concern is for the people that have bought into his lie and have sold their belongings, quit their jobs, left their churches and their families and now they are sitting at home listening to Family Radio and waiting for the end,” Mr. Nederhood said. “I’m terribly concerned.”

Although the Family Radio headquarters were mostly abandoned on Friday, the company’s flagship station — KEAR, 610 AM — continued to broadcast religious music, interspersed with sermons and biblically flavored life lessons.

There were also a few curiosity seekers who had made the pilgrimage, including one woman who refused to give her name but peered into the darkened building.

“Is this where,” she asked, “the world is going to end?”

Link

End of the World Aftermath: Live-Blogging the “Apocalypse”

1:14 AM – It’s current 6:14 PM in Tonga.  If Family Radio were correct, we’d expect to hear reports of Raptured Tongans.

1:19 AM – This is a bit surreal.  The East Coast station is running a program about heart health, and how to reduce your cholesterol.  Meanwhile, the West Coast station is playing an apparently pre-recorded program “showing” how Scripture proves the end times. So far, the speaker is hammering the fact that Biblical “days” sometimes means “years.”  True enough, but it’s hard to see why it always means years.  I’m incredulous at the number of assumptions built into their model “proving” the end times mathematically.  But what’s stranger than that has to be the heart health program.

1:25 AM – Two comments already!  It’s nice to see how Christopher and Fr. Strobl are spending what may or may not be their last night on Earth.  On a more serious note, it occurs to me that there are some folks who really will die today.  A lot of them, just as there are every day.  I hope that those people prepared themselves as seriously as if the world were truly going to end.

1:32 AM – From Twitter:

Rapture prank: On Saturday, take some of your unwanted clothes and shoes and leave sets of them arranged on sidewalks and lawns around town.

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“Cheer up! It’s not the end of the world.”

As the deadline for the Apocalpyse passed in the Pacific islands, New Zealand and Australia, it became apparent that Camping’s prediction of the end of the world was to end not with a bang but with a whimper.

Only on Twitter did the supposed armageddon sweep the world, with users expressing their mock disappointment at the lack of dead people rising from their graves.

New Zealander Daniel Boerman tweeted: “I’m from New Zealand, it is 6:06PM, the world has NOT ended. No earthquakes here, all waiting for the rapture can relax for now. #Rapture”

In Australia, Jon Gall of Melbourne was unimpressed by the lack of fire and brimstone. He tweeted: “#Rapture time here in Melbourne. A rather quiet sort of rapture if you ask me.

“Well we have had the #Rapture going for 50 minutes now. So far it hasn’t interrupted my fish & chips and glass of stout.”

In Brisbane, KillaJeules, was similarly disappointed by the lack of a Hollywood blockbuster ending: “So it’s 6:37pm here in Brisbane, Australia. No earthquakes. No beaming up of Christians. No zombie apocalypse. No surprises haha.”

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Writer claims end of the world guy (Mr. Camping) got his idea from (gasp) a Jesuit!

The modern interpretation of the prophecies in Daniel and Revelation is that they are coded references to contemporary politics and all the tyrants, harlots and horned beasts in them are long since forgotten dust. But prophecy is much more fun. By close study of the Book of Daniel, the Spanish Jesuit Francisco Ribera further invented the doctrine of the Rapture. This breaks the last judgment into two parts – first the real Christians are swept up into heaven, then the bad stuff happens to the rest of us.

Since this was a Jesuit doctrine, it was completely unacceptable to Protestants until the 19th century, when it was republished by another Jesuit, writing pseudonymously as a rabbi. From Jewish sources, it made perfect sense to Edward Irving, a fashionable Scottish preacher in London in the 1820s. By the 1830s his congregation was speaking tongues and prophesying and claiming miraculous healings, like an early version of Holy Trinity Brompton.

From there the doctrine crossed the Atlantic. William Miller, a Baptist minister in upstate New York, decided that when the Book of Daniel said “Unto two thousand and three hundred days; then shall the sanctuary be cleansed”, it obviously meant 2,300 years; and by “the sanctuary being cleansed” it obviously meant the return of Jesus: all he had to do was to establish the date from which Daniel was counting, and all would be ready.

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Editor’s note: Based on the plethora of recent news stories about apostate Jesuits from all around the world, I’ve come to a “working conclusion” that when the prophesied Anti-Christ is truly revealed, he will very likely be a Jesuit.