Belloc: The origins of that great movement which shook and split for generations the spiritual world, and which we call the “Reformation”.

The most important thing about the Reformation is to understand it. Not only to follow the story of it stage by stage – a process always necessary to the understanding of any historical matter – but to grasp its essential nature.

On this last it is easy for modern people to go wrong, and especially modern people of the English-speaking world. The nations we English-speaking people know are, with the exception of Ireland, predominantly Protestant; and yet (with the exception of Great Britain and South Africa) they harbour large Catholic minorities.

In that English-speaking world (to which this present writing is addressed) there is full consciousness of what the Protestant spirit has been and what it has become in its present modification.

Link

A run on Cyprus banks: Your ATM transaction has been canceled due to a technical issue.

Congratulations Cyprus savers – you were just betrayed by both your politicians, and by Europe – sorry, but you are the “creeping impairments” in the game known as European bankruptcy. And so is anywhere between 6.75% and 9.9% of your money, which you were foolish enough to keep with your banks (where at least you were compensated with a savings yield of… 0%).

More importantly, as of this morning Europe has finally grasped that there is a 6.75% to 9.9% premium to holding physical cash in your mattress rather than having it stored with your local friendly insolvent bank.

Luckily Cyrpus is so “small” what just happened there will never happen anywhere else: after all in Europe nobody has ever heard of “setting an example”. Or so the thinking among Europe’s unthinking political elite goes.

And congratulations Europe: just when people almost believed you things are “fixed” you go ahead and prove to the world that you are as disunified (because size doesn’t matter in a true union), as confused, as stupid and as broke as ever.

Text and photos

Editor’s note: Coming soon to a bank in your neighborhood?

Cardinal Schönborn and his hopes for the New Evangelization

“From the very beginning of his ministry, the Pope has stressed that Christian faith, Christian life is not first of all a series of doctrines, not first of all as a series of rules, but a deepening friendship with Jesus. He (the Pope) is convinced that without faith you cannot understand Christian morals. Without faith you cannot understand Christian life. And therefore, I think the big challenge is really to deepen our faith. Call it new evangelization, call it mission – I think it has very much to do with conversion,” the cardinal explained.

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Did Constantine’s victory under the sign of the Cross lead to persecution of the Jews?

As Claire Sotinel, Professor of Roman History at the University Paris-Est Cherethites, will explain during her presentation at the international conference “Constantine the Great: The Roots of Europe,” to be held in the Vatican from 18 to 21 April: all Constantine did was open a Christian church in Jerusalem, which at the time was not Jewish, but pagan.

But the Chief Rabbi of Rome, Riccardo Di Segni, disagrees. “The conversion of Constantine changed everything,” the spiritual leader of the oldest Jewish community in Europe told Vatican Insider. “That event has had a decisive impact on history, and is closely related to the persecution of the Jews.” The conversion of Constantine, he added, “has divided history into ‘before’ and ‘after,’ causing such turmoil that Emperor Julian’s unsuccessful attempt to remedy it earned him the title of ‘the Apostate.’ It goes against all historical evidence to deny it.”

Link

Editor’s note: The seminal event for the Jews was the 70 AD destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, which was followed up by many years of wars and rebellions, leaving what remained of the Holy Land under the occupation of pagans, rather than Jews.

But it was the persecution of Christians by the Jews which ultimately contributed most to the separation of the two faiths, since that (along with the grace of God) is what caused St. Peter and St. Paul to journey to Rome, in the first place.

All this happened more than two centuries before Constantine.

The Rabbi does have a point, though. Once Christianity became the “official” faith of the Roman Empire … Judaism … along with many of the Roman’s favorite pagan cults … would soon and forever more … be cast as obsolete and essentially apostate religions.

The Miracle that is the Catholic Church

by Doug Lawrence

It was the year 1531. In Europe, the Protestant Reformation had begun, and the ranks of the Catholic Church would soon be reduced by hundreds of thousands … perhaps even millions … of fallen away souls.

Half a world away, at Tepeyac, a hill northwest of Mexico City, a poor farmer experienced a strange apparition, leading to a remarkable, supernatural turn of events that would result in the conversion of millions of native people to Catholicism, put an end to the local practice of human sacrifice, and more than make up for the losses suffered by the Church, on the continent of Europe.

Read more about the amazing events in Mexico, here.

The pope’s current visit to Africa reminds us, despite continuing, major losses in the developed world, that the Catholic faith is still remarkably vibrant, and the Gospel of Jesus Christ is still hugely relevant, especially on the African continent, where over the last hundred years, Catholic Church membership has grown from 2 million, to over 160 million souls.

Read more about the Catholic Church in Africa, here.

Isn’t it nice to know that God has a way of doing things that … despite our many failings and shortcomings … and despite the many and continuing challenges in the world … always brings about what he ultimately intends … for our good … and for the good of his holy church?

To paraphrase our site’s motto:
God loves us. God will provide. Believe it. It’s true!

Greece now consigned to a new type of (Socialist) debtor’s prison

Factions inside the European Commission are discussing proposals to make defaulting states “wards” of the Commission, effectively ending national sovereignty for indebted states.  Each “ward” would be assigned a budget officer who would oversee spending in the geographical area under his or her direction.

How is this to be tolerated on a continent that once prized freedom and accountable, democratic government?  American victory in World War II seems overshadowed by the willful acquiescence to despotic rule which now characterizes European political organization.  The world watches with bated breath as European nations line up to surrender precious, historic freedom to Brussels.  And Greece, the cradle of democracy, is next on the menu.

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A little known fact about Ash Wednesday

It’s an American custom to smear the ashes on the forehead. In Europe, ashes are usually sprinkled over the crown of the head.

Link

The Crusades: A direct response to Muslim aggression and conquest.

Christians in the eleventh century were not paranoid fanatics. Muslims really were gunning for them. While Muslims can be peaceful, Islam was born in war and grew the same way. From the time of Mohammed, the means of Muslim expansion was always the sword. Muslim thought divides the world into two spheres, the Abode of Islam and the Abode of War. Christianity — and for that matter any other non-Muslim religion — has no abode. Christians and Jews can be tolerated within a Muslim state under Muslim rule. But, in traditional Islam, Christian and Jewish states must be destroyed and their lands conquered. When Mohammed was waging war against Mecca in the seventh century, Christianity was the dominant religion of power and wealth. As the faith of the Roman Empire, it spanned the entire Mediterranean, including the Middle East, where it was born. The Christian world, therefore, was a prime target for the earliest caliphs, and it would remain so for Muslim leaders for the next thousand years.

With enormous energy, the warriors of Islam struck out against the Christians shortly after Mohammed’s death. They were extremely successful. Palestine, Syria, and Egypt — once the most heavily Christian areas in the world — quickly succumbed. By the eighth century, Muslim armies had conquered all of Christian North Africa and Spain. In the eleventh century, the Seljuk Turks conquered Asia Minor (modern Turkey), which had been Christian since the time of St. Paul. The old Roman Empire, known to modern historians as the Byzantine Empire, was reduced to little more than Greece. In desperation, the emperor in Constantinople sent word to the Christians of western Europe asking them to aid their brothers and sisters in the East.

That is what gave birth to the Crusades. They were not the brainchild of an ambitious pope or rapacious knights but a response to more than four centuries of conquests in which Muslims had already captured two-thirds of the old Christian world. At some point, Christianity as a faith and a culture had to defend itself or be subsumed by Islam. The Crusades were that defense.

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Things the “libs” will never tell you about Muslim conquest and the Crusades

First, the historical facts: a long “train of abuses”, to borrow Jefferson’s phrase, preceded the launching of the First Crusade in 1096. Since its very inception, Islam had waged an unremitting war against Christianity.

It conquered and subjugated centuries-old Christian societies in the Middle East and North Africa. After sweeping through France, the Muslim advance was finally checked by Charles Martel at the Battle of Tours in 732.

Following this, Muslim aggression against Christians continued in southern Italy, with the conquest of Sicily in 827. Resistance to these repeated acts of aggression was not characterized as a “crusade”, but simply necessary self-defense.

Over the next centuries, the Seljuq Turks, who converted to Islam, waged war against the Eastern Christian Byzantine Empire.

At the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, the Turks wiped out the Byzantine army, leaving Emperor Alexius Commenus helpless before a relentless and determined foe. Not long after this, he sent envoys to Pope Urban II pleading for military aid.

The Council of Clermont was called by the pope in 1095, in which he addressed the clergy, knights, and commoners who had assembled. To the knights especially his words were both reproving and encouraging:

You, the oppressers of children, plunderers of widows; you, guilty of homicide, of sacrilege, robbers of another’s rights; you who await the pay of thieves for the shedding of Christian blood — as vultures smell fetid corpses, so do you sense battles from afar and rush to them eagerly. Verily, this is the worst way, for it is utterly removed from God! if, forsooth, you wish to be mindful of your souls, either lay down the girdle of such knighthood, or advance boldly, as knights of Christ, and rush as quickly as you can to the defence of the Eastern Church. For she it is from whom the joys of your whole salvation have come forth, who poured into your mouths the milk of divine wisdom, who set before you the holy teachings of the Gospels.

What was at stake was nothing less than the preservation of Christianity, and the civilization which had, even if imperfectly, sought to embody its teachings in the world. This was also evidenced by the increasingly hostility to Christians still living in the Levant (the Holy Land), as well as those who went on pilgrimage; in 1009, the Fatimid caliph Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah ordered the Church of the Holy Sepulcher – in an act the Catholic Encyclopedia rightly calls a “fit of madness” – razed to the ground.

This was followed by an even broader campaign against Christianity throughout the Levant, culminating in the destruction of thousands of Christian churches.

Read more by Joe Hargrave at The American Catholic

The Crusades – 101


Following his death, Muhammad’s successors–the caliphs–continued an aggressive campaign of expansion. In less than a century they had seized control–among other lands–of Syria, Palestine, and North Africa. Though today we are used to thinking of these lands as Muslim, at the time they were Christian. It has been said that the expanding Muslim empire consumed half of Christian civilization. Even Europe itself was threatened. Muslims seized control of southern Spain, invaded France, and were threatening to invade Rome itself when their advance was defeated by Charles Martel at the battle of Poitiers in 732.

Read more

And more …

Enough is Enough: The Crusades and The Jihad Are Not Equivalents


First, the historical facts: a long “train of abuses”, to borrow Jefferson’s phrase, preceded the launching of the First Crusade in 1096. Since its very inception, Islam had waged an unremitting war against Christianity. It conquered and subjugated centuries-old Christian societies in the Middle East and North Africa. After sweeping through France, the Muslim advance was finally checked by Charles Martel at the Battle of Tours in 732. Following this, Muslim aggression against Christians continued in southern Italy, with the conquest of Sicily in 827. Resistance to these repeated acts of aggression was not characterized as a “crusade”, but simply necessary self-defense.

Over the next centuries, the Seljuq Turks, who converted to Islam, waged war against the Eastern Christian Byzantine Empire. At the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, the Turks wiped out the Byzantine army, leaving Emperor Alexius Commenus helpless before a relentless and determined foe. Not long after this, he sent envoys to Pope Urban II pleading for military aid. The Council of Clermont was called by the pope in 1095, in which he addressed the clergy, knights, and commoners who had assembled. To the knights especially his words were both reproving and encouraging:

You, the oppressers of children, plunderers of widows; you, guilty of homicide, of sacrilege, robbers of another’s rights; you who await the pay of thieves for the shedding of Christian blood — as vultures smell fetid corpses, so do you sense battles from afar and rush to them eagerly. Verily, this is the worst way, for it is utterly removed from God! if, forsooth, you wish to be mindful of your souls, either lay down the girdle of such knighthood, or advance boldly, as knights of Christ, and rush as quickly as you can to the defense of the Eastern Church. For she it is from whom the joys of your whole salvation have come forth, who poured into your mouths the milk of divine wisdom, who set before you the holy teachings of the Gospels.

What was at stake was nothing less than the preservation of Christianity, and the civilization which had, even if imperfectly, sought to embody its teachings in the world.

Read more

Vatican officials: in supporting immigrants, the church is acting on principle, not pragmatism.

In Europe, as in the United States, the Roman Catholic Church has assumed a leading role as a protector of, and advocate for, immigrants. But whereas the largest bloc of migrants to the United States are Catholic, the majority of European immigrants are Muslim.

In the United States, some critics of the church accuse outspoken clerics such as Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles of self-interest when they support immigrant rights and immigration reform. There is logic to the argument because Latin American Catholics are pumping new life into a church that has been losing its hold on many native-born Americans.

Such an argument is more difficult to make in Europe, where the ranks of native-born Catholics are declining without being refreshed by large numbers of Catholic immigrants. Vatican officials say that, in supporting immigrants, the church is acting on principle, not pragmatism — and that the Catholic record in Europe lends credence to those who say that American bishops have pure intentions in their immigration advocacy.

“For the church, the perspective is … the right of the human person to be treated with dignity,” said Father Federico Lombardi, the chief Vatican spokesman. “It is a general principle; it’s not just a religious principle. It is more profound.”

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EU Parliament Building is (literally) a modern Tower of Babel

Ever since its completion on December 14 1999, the EU parliament has raised eyebrows and questions regarding its structure. The main tower, called the “Louise Weiss” building, looks peculiar and modernist. Why does it look unfinished? Promoters say it reflects the “unfinished nature of Europe”. However, some research on the subject reveals the dark and deep symbolism of the building. Exposing the real source of inspiration behind the Louise Weiss building is exposing the esoteric beliefs of the world elite, their dark aspirations and their interpretation of ancient scriptures.

We’ll go straight to the point: the Louise Weiss building is meant to look like painting “The Tower of Babel” by Pieter Brueghel the Elder in 1563. Story says that the Tower of Babel was never completed. So, the UN Parliament is basically continuing the unfinished work of Nimrod, the infamous tyrant, who was building the Tower of Babel to defy God. Do you think this is a good source of inspiration for a “democratic institution”?

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Christopher Ferraro gives us a modern world history lesson – Free Masonry vs. The Catholic Church

Coming on September 1 is Liberty: the God that Failed, which examines “the long chain of frauds and usurpations” by which the common man was subjected to the power of secularized central governments founded on the very principles radical libertarians defend (even as they complain about the resulting abuses of state power and call for an “anarcho-capitalist” utopia).

One cannot understand the perilous situation in which our Pope finds himself today without recognizing that he is struggling against a social order whose anti-Catholic and Masonic foundations have long since been forgotten. In the following excerpt from Liberty: the God that Failed, Mr. Ferrara provides a sketch of Pope Leo XIII’s own struggle against the forces that were constructing political modernity during his pontificate by the violent overthrow of Catholic social order in country after country. By reviewing this history we can learn not only how the Church arrived at her present state of crisis but also what we can expect in the future if she is not completely reformed according to her own sacred Tradition. MJM

Pope Leo XIII and the New Zeitgeist

The pontificate of Leo XIII (1878-1903) spanned the historical transition between the Church’s militant opposition to emerging political modernity, as summed up in the Syllabus, and a conditional truce with the new order of Liberty for lack of any practical possibility of overturning it, especially in France. Leo’s pontificate also spanned the Progressive Era in America (1890 to the early 1900s) and the rise of what has been called “the Americanist heresy” among liberal American Catholics who, like their European counterparts, opposed the “ultramontanes,” slighted the Syllabus, and sought not merely a prudential accommodation to the new order, but the Church’s embrace of Liberty as a positive good and indeed the divinely ordained future of the human race. Leo charted a course through these developments that left the Church’s opposition to the new order intact in principle and rejected “Americanism,” but recognized the insuperable practical realities that had come into play after a century of revolution and social upheaval had all but destroyed Christendom.

By the time Pope Leo ascended to the papacy in 1878, the post-Christian state was already a reality in America, France, and Italy, where the Pope’s temporal sovereignty now extended no further than a Vatican city state surrounded by a republic that Masonic heroes had imposed by the usual means: force of arms, followed by token plebiscites and the passive popular acceptance of a fait accompli. As the turn of the century approached no one was more aware than Leo that, as the mid-20th century liberal Catholic luminary, John Courtney Murray, S.J. put it, “a new Zeitgeist was on its conquering march, [and] a new climate of opinion and feeling had rolled in from many quarters upon the world, especially upon the European world which was closest to him.” [i]

In his inaugural encyclical, Inscrutabili (1878), on “the evils of society,” Leo offered this withering assessment of what the new Zeitgeist had produced after a century of violent revolution, war and devastation:

… widespread subversion of the primary truths on which, as on its foundations, human society is based;… obstinacy of mind that will not brook any authority however lawful;… endless sources of disagreement… civil strife, and ruthless war and bloodshed;… contempt of law which molds characters and is the shield of righteousness;… insatiable craving for things perishable, with complete forgetfulness of things eternal, leading up to the desperate madness whereby so many wretched beings [] scruple not to lay violent hands upon themselves;… the shamelessness of those who, full of treachery, make semblance of being champions of country, of freedom, and every kind of right; in fine, the deadly kind of plague which infects in its inmost recesses, allowing it no respite and foreboding ever fresh disturbances and final disaster.[ii]

In his next encyclical, Quod apostolici, issued in the same year, Leo repeated the theme of a “deadly plague that is creeping into the very fibres of human society and leading it on to the verge of destruction…”[iii] A line of subsequent Popes, including Pope Pius XII, would track the progress of the “plague” in their own pronouncements, offering a series of increasingly grim prognoses culminating in Pius XII’s observations after World War II that “We are overwhelmed with sadness and anguish, seeing that the wickedness of perverse men has reached a degree of impiety that is unbelievable and absolutely unknown in other times,”[iv] and that “[t]he human race is involved today in a supreme crisis, which will issue in its salvation by Christ, or in its destruction.” [v]

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Everything that makes Europe great has its roots in the Bible

Europe

Everything that makes Europe great has its roots in the Bible, says Cardinal Bozanic

.- The Archbishop of Zagreb, Cardinal Josip Bozanic, said this week that “an indissoluble link exists between the Bible and Europe. Everything that made European culture and its civilization great has its beginning in the Bible.”

During his intervention at the Synod of Bishops, the Croatian cardinal explained that “issues such as the dignity of the person, the recognition of human rights, the separation of Church and State—just to cite a few examples—have their nucleus in the wellspring of the Bible. Social justice, rights, the criticism of any type of idolatry, the rejection of false images of God, also have their foundation in the Bible,” he added.

Likewise, the cardinal warned that a “Europe without God runs the risk of becoming a den of anguish and of building a civilization of fear.  The Word of God restores hope and joy. Europe, moreover, enters into crisis when it does not accept the interpretive strength of the Word of God, which has its ultimate foundation in faith and in inspiration.  This is an arduous task for all of the scientific disciplines, and especially for theology,” he said.

“Europe rightly brags of the development of its own theological thought but a subsequent effort is necessary for a more favorable confrontation with the new interpretations and scientific searches, which are often, on purpose, separated from the hermeneutic paradigms of Christian truth.”

“In fact, a culture that breaks with the Christian celebration, that is, with the celebration of the Mystery of the kindness of God and salvation in Christ, jeopardizes its own happiness and pushes Europe towards a civilization of affliction and of sadness,” Cardinal Bozanic argued. “The Word of God restores to the European man the capacity to celebrate life. Wherever the celebration of the Christian mysteries exist, there the Church is young, and that guarantees youth for Europe,” he concluded.

Who do you think the whore is in the Book of Revelation?

europascult.jpg

Q: Who do you think the whore is in the Book of Revelation? 

A: The original “woman riding the beast” is the pagan goddess Europa, for whom the continent of Europe was named.

You’ll find a statue of same gracing the front of the EU parliament building located in Brussels, Belgium today (see photo).

Plenty of hills, plenty of kings, plenty of scarlet, and plenty of whoring going around there, to this day.

As for the rest, and how everything might one day come together, your guess is as good as anyone’s … because so far … all have consistently guessed wrong.