The Perils of Progressivism

timeline

This timeline, along with these recent statistics, demonstrates that the eroding of family life in the United States is not something sudden, but rather the result of a gradual process of social change.

The events listed are not a random collection, but show a determined and coordinated decline of our culture, rooted in our changing understanding of sexuality, marriage and family, and even life itself (which is now a commodity, which can be engineered).

The link between contraception, abortion, and homosexuality itself can be demonstrated simply by examining the Supreme Court decisions concerning these issues, which in their opinions directly build one upon the other.

See the timeline

The Dangers of Hospice

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Every day, thousands of families have a loved one of theirs placed in hospice care, thinking that hospice is simply a place where elderly people die a comfortable, peaceful death. Days later, their loved one dies, and their family assumes that the person’s death was due to complications from an ailment they had, or just “natural causes”. But what they don’t know is that their loved one was murdered. And an unfortunate majority of others don’t realize it, either.

Hospice is a type of care that “cares” for elderly people who have illnesses. Their motive is to make the end of their life as peaceful as possible. Or at least, that’s what they say their motive is.

The reality is that hospice is actually a tool of the New World Order. Just as abortion kills unborn babies, hospice kills off old people, as a means of what is known as “population control”.

Link

The European Union, established for economic purposes, has, over the years, become clearly anti-Catholic…

Read the rest of the letter

Belgian Bioethics: First they kill you. Then they harvest your organs. And it’s all legal!

Imagine being a devalued person with a serious disability and come to believe your life isn’t worth anything, and in fact, worry that you are a burden, to realize that you could reverse the situation by being euthanized and harvested?   This is a emotional inducement to be killed, and as such, is extremely dangerous to the well-being of people with serious disabilities.

And it won’t stop there.  Just as I was right in my 1993 prediction, trust me on this: Coming next–paying people with serious disabilities to be killed and harvested, like Jack Kevorkian once advocated.  Utilitarian booster of such a course would argue that it saves society money on the costs of long term care, allow the disabled person the satisfaction of offering a benefit to society out of their personal tragedy, and leave a nice bundle for family, friends, or cause.  Win. Win. Win.

Once you accept the premise that there is such a thing as a life not worth living–to the point that killing is an acceptable answer to the problem–there aren’t many arguments left against such a regime. People with disabilities should be very alarmed.

Link

Catholic Voting Principles – Direction for an Informed Conscience


Although the Church does not specifically endorse candidates for which to vote, we are given moral principles to form our consciences and to guide us in order to comply with the teaching authority of the Church: Candidates and issues should first be evaluated on their opposition to the five moral issues about which there can be no compromise for faithful Catholics: abortion, euthanasia, embryonic stem cell research, cloning and homosexual “same-sex marriage.” The Church regards these as intrinsic evils and consideration of them takes highest priority.

Preferred candidates would be those that come closest to the defense of life and family on these issues. Afterwards, candidates can be evaluated regarding their stand on other important issues such as the economy, war, poverty, immigration, education, taxes, etc. Although these issues also have moral elements, they do not carry the same moral weight and priority as the fundamental life issues. Unfortunately, Catholics have often confused second order “social issues” with first order “moral issues.”

Read more

The Five Non-Negotiables: For Catholics, some political issues are much more important than others.

Abortion, euthanasia, embryonic stem cell experimentation, human cloning, and same-sex marriage have been called non-negotiable issues in certain Catholic circles.  Why?  Because they involve intrinsic evils that government can never legitimately authorize. They involve issues on which all Catholics are obliged, as Catholics, to agree.

Most other concerns—even very important ones such as capital punishment or the Iraq war—are subjects about which Catholics can legitimately disagree.

Not so with the five non-negotiable issues.   On these issues there is such a thing as the Catholic position, whether or not certain Catholics choose to embrace that position.

Cardinal Ratzinger made this point recently in connection with abortion and euthanasia on the one hand and capital punishment and war on the other.  In his letter, “Worthiness to Receive Holy Communion,” he set out general principles regarding reception of the Eucharist by those who support abortion rights and euthanasia.

Ratzinger wrote, “Not all moral issues have the same moral weight as abortion and euthanasia.  For example, if a Catholic were to be at odds with the Holy Father on the application of capital punishment or on the decision to wage way, he would not for that reason be considered unworthy to present himself to receive Holy Communion.  While the Church exhorts civil authorities to seek peace, not war, and to exercise discretion and mercy in imposing punishment on criminals, it may still be permissible to take up arms to repel an aggressor or to have recourse to capital punishment.  There may be a legitimate diversity of opinion even among Catholics about waging war and applying the death penalty, but not however with regard to abortion and euthanasia.”

Given the nature of embryonic stem cell research and human cloning, the same absolute prohibition that applies to abortion and euthanasia applies to these things.  Likewise, Catholic teaching requires an absolute opposition to same-sex marriage.

Catholics have an obligation to form their consciences according to the teaching of the Church.  That teaching allows a wide range of conscientious judgments on a number of important, political issues.   Abortion, euthanasia, embryonic stem cell experimentation, human cloning, and same-sex marriage are not among those issues.  On these subjects there is but a single legitimate “Catholic position.” When it comes to legal support for these issues, one can be Catholic or “prochoice,” but not Catholic and “prochoice.”

Read more from the Ignatius Press blog

Judy Brown writes about progressivism, euthanasia, death, and you


We are witnessing yet another historic shift in the social definition of a good death, a shift toward diversity. Imagine us respecting a range of attitudes with which, and situations in which, people die. In Montana, the terminally ill may now define their own terms for freedom from unbearable physical or psychological suffering, and hopefully find their particular paths to sanity in their dying experiences.

In case you had a problem picking out all the current buzz words for hip, progressive thinking, think about these:

  • diversity = there is no good or evil
  • in the closet = killing others used be a no-no
  • good death = prescribed dying rather than dying because mortal life has ended
  • death with dignity = ending it all now rather than later
  • unnecessary suffering = someone else is tired of watching you die
  • freedom = even though you did not give yourself life, you have the right to end it anytime you see fit [or someone else does]
  • paths = personal feelings versus objective right and wrong

In other words, these new terms encompass just about anything that can be said to avoid admitting that there is a God and He does have laws. Some folks will really be surprised later on when life as we know it is over.

Read more from Judy Brown