6-part mini series: “Why We’re Contraception-Free”.

The series tells the true story of how two educated evangelical Protestants in love were of course planning on using contraception (everyone does), but had their plans turned upside after stumbling across a decades old document written by a long-dead Pope.

Link

Editor’s note: True Romance!

Weigel: The days of Recreational Catholicism—Catholicism as a traditional, leisure-time activity absorbing perhaps ninety minutes of one’s time on a weekend—is over.

The challenge can be defined simply: Throughout the Western world, the culture no longer carries the faith, because the culture has become increasingly hostile to the faith. Catholicism can no longer be absorbed by osmosis from the environment, for the environment has become toxic. So we can no longer sit back and assume that decent lives lived in conformity with the prevailing cultural norms will somehow convey the faith to our children and grandchildren and invite others to consider entering the Church.

No, in our new situation, Catholicism has to be proposed, and Catholicism has to be lived in radical fidelity to Christ and the Gospel.

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The trends unleashed in the 1960’s threw all of American Christianity into crisis.

Yet instead of attracting a younger, more open-minded demographic with these changes, the Episcopal Church’s dying has proceeded apace. Last week, while the church’s House of Bishops was approving a rite to bless same-sex unions, Episcopalian church attendance figures for 2000-10 circulated in the religion blogosphere. They showed something between a decline and a collapse: In the last decade, average Sunday attendance dropped 23 percent, and not a single Episcopal diocese in the country saw churchgoing increase.

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The original Evangelical, Pentecostal, Apostolic, Bible Believin’, Charismatic, Trinitarian, Full-Gospel Church of Jesus Christ.

…the evangelical movement is, in fact, Catholic. We need not emulate our non-Catholic brothers to fix our problems. We need only look to our own identity in Christ.

I’m pretty sure the Holy Spirit has something to do with all this…

Evangelical Christianity started with the apostles. Evangelical means nothing less than “Gospel Christian” and the apostles were that, if nothing else. How could the first preachers of the Gospel – the evangelium – not be evangelicals?

The apostolic era model of the evangelical way of life is preserved in the Book of Acts:

They devoted themselves to the teaching of the apostles and to the communal life, to the breaking of the bread and to the prayers. Awe came upon everyone, and many wonders and signs were done through the apostles. All who believed were together and had all things in common; they would sell their property and possessions and divide them among all according to each one’s need. Every day they devoted themselves to meeting together in the temple area and to breaking bread in their homes. They ate their meals with exultation and sincerity of heart, praising God and enjoying favor with all the people. And every day the Lord added to their number those who were being saved. -Acts 2:42-47

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Religious rallies across USA protest birth-control mandate

Thousands of people rallied today in an estimated 140 cities nationwide to protest mandatory insurance coverage for birth control, which opponents say threatens religious freedom.

Crowd estimates ranged from dozens to hundreds to thousands, according to various news reports. Protesters were characterized as being mostly conservative Catholics, evangelicals and abortion opponents.

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PRESS RELEASE: A January 29 event in keeping with the spirit of MLK

THE ARCHANGEL INSTITUTE MARKS MLK DAY
WITH THE ANNOUNCEMENT OF A COMMUNITY DISCUSSION
HONORING THE SPIRIT OF MLK’s
LETTER FROM A BIRMINGHAM JAIL


The ArchAngel Institute is presenting a community discussion of the Manhattan Declaration in the basement theater of the Allen County Public Library at 3 pm on Saturday, January 29, 2011.

The Manhattan Declaration is a call to “Christian Conscience” that was authored by Catholic and Evangelical scholars. It has been signed by tens of thousands in Christian leadership. It is a pledge to stand firm on the historic Christian teachings regarding the sanctity of human life, the definition of marriage and the free exercise of the Faith. More on this document is available here: http://www.manhattandeclaration.org

A panel experienced in both Christian activism and the discussion of Christian obedience in the face of anti-Christian governance will address the Declaration from differing perspectives. Priests Father David Mary and Father Glenn Kohrman are on this panel, as well as theologian Dr. John Bequette and nurse/pro-life advocate Gloria Carrel.

Former Bishop Dwenger teacher/coach and local businessman Bob Brownis hosting this event for the ArchAngel Institute. This promises to be an interesting and robust conversation of some of the most controversial topics of the day. The panel will take questions from those in attendance.

This event follows the 37th Annual March for Life, which begins with a rally at the Scottish Rite Cathedral at 12 noon on the same day.

Visit the ArchAngel Institute Site

Staunch Evangelical Missionary Decides To Become Catholic


From the time I was a kid, I was taught that in the hierarchy of careers, foreign missionary service was right at the top of the list of things that please God. Marty and I discussed the possibility of his teaching in a school for missionary children. Since he already spoke Spanish, we knew it was likely we’d end up in Latin America or Spain. We prayed that God would use us as missionaries to bring Catholics to Christ. We wanted to bring them “true Christianity.” From the time we made that decision until our arrival in Guatemala, a little over eight years went by.

Shortly after we arrived in Guatemala my tidy paradigm of “true Christianity” began to disintegrate. For more than two years, I experienced a persistent nagging at the back of my consciousness regarding several theological issues. Getting to the mission field brought those problems to the fore.

Perhaps the most distasteful of the nagging issues was what I had come to see as the cultural hegemony inherent in Evangelicalism’s mission strategy. Evangelicals were (and are) importing wholesale a specifically American brand of piety, imposing the forms and symbols and jargon of “American Christianity” on the people in other countries. This religious colonialism bothered me a lot.

There was also the problem of illiteracy in Latin America. Since childhood I had been steeped in the mindset that the Bible is the literal touchstone of all things Christian. Consequently, I had a hard time integrating the Evangelical “read it for yourself” approach with a culture in which many people couldn’t read.

And finally, the Protestant notion of sola scriptura (the Bible alone) fell apart each time I tried to test it. I began to see that Evangelicalism’s insistence on going by the Bible alone led continually into division and problems. Worse yet, claiming to go by the Bible alone didn’t really provide any certitude of belief for believers.

Because of my upbringing and theological training, I didn’t realize at first that as soon as I allowed myself to question these three problem areas I was pointing myself in the direction of Rome. I thought I was just settling some troubling issues, but it was really at this point that my journey into the Catholic Church began.

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