The Evils of Modernism as demonstrated by the seriously flawed documents of Vatican II and the subsequent teachings of Popes Paul VI, John Paul II, Benedict XVI and Frances

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Modernism thrives on vague and ambiguous expressions, on lack of precision, on lack of clear definitions, because Modernism, being sinister, detests clarity, which is one of the hallmarks of truth and orthodoxy: “For every one that doth evil hateth the light, and cometh not to the light, that his works may not be reproved” (John 3:20).

Modernism seeks to make what is certain, doubtful, what is clear, confusing; it tries to make the straight paths of True Catholicism crooked, and so becomes the anti-Gospel.”

A.J. pulls no punches

The danger of subscribing to the falacious “prosperity” Gospel

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Greed is often downplayed today where accumulation and ostentatious display of wealth is often celebrated.  Great rooms with cathedral ceilings, 72″ flat screen TVs and even private home theaters (entertainment centers), fancy cars etc., are shamelessly flaunted.

But greed is at the root of a lot of evils and suffering. Scripture says,

For we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world; but if we have food and clothing, with these we shall be content. But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and hurtful desires that plunge men into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is the root of all evils; it is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced their hearts with many pangs. (1 Tim 6:7-10)

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Dirty little secret about the 2nd Vatican Council: Many of the evils the pre-conciliar popes opposed, have been triumphant in the everyday life of the Church ever since.

As the Holy Father wrote of “liturgical renewal, joyful fervor, and radiant vitality,” the Archdiocese of Detroit, by contrast (to name just one such example), was addressing the real world state-of-affairs by unveiling plans to board-up some 40% of its parishes.

His successor, Pope Benedict XVI, followed suit, painting similarly unrealistic portraits of the Council’s impact on Catholic life.

On January 1, 2013, for example, Catholics who have long since accepted bankrupt dioceses, empty seminaries and irreverent liturgies as the “new normal” heard Pope Benedict’s Message for the World Day of Peace, in which the Holy Father spoke of “the Second Vatican Council which helped to strengthen the Church’s mission in the world.”

The matter-of-factness with which the pope offered this assessment would seem to suggest that it is simply self-evident that the Council fortified the Church, and yet one is hard pressed to deny that every meaningful measure indicates precisely the opposite.

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