So what is a “mystery”? It is something that can be experienced even if it cannot be explained.

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This is one of the first steps of faith–to trace in your life and in the ways of the world the mysterious way God works. He does not work according to our plans and our sensible ways of organizing everything. He is always busy under the radar and behind the scenes doing his work. Faith is being able to see what is going on and how he works in his strange and mysterious way.

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“Change” has come to the Vatican

The Argentine-born pontiff offered the encouragement for renewal in a homily during Mass Saturday at the Vatican City hotel where he lives. Francis told Catholics ”not to be afraid of renewing some structures” to accord with ”the places, the times” and the people, but he didn’t specify what needed to be changed.

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Editor’s note: Here we have the new Pontiff channeling Barack Obama, instead of the Holy Spirit. Evidently, liberals and Jesuits think alike. 

Kreeft: How to successfully discern God’s will for your life … and act accordingly.

Does God have one right choice for me in each decision I make?

When we pray for wisdom to discern God’s will when it comes to choosing a mate, a career, a job change, a move, a home, a school, a friend, a vacation, how to spend money, or any other choice, big or little, whenever there are two or more different paths opening up before us and we have to choose, does God always will one of those paths for us? If so, how do we discern it?

Many Christians who struggle with this question today are unaware that Christians of the past can help them from their own experience. Christian wisdom embodied in the lives and teachings of the saints tells us two things that are relevant to this question.

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Voris: Catholicism is as tangible as the water you drink and the air you breath and the food you eat.


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Pope cites St. Anselm: “First, one must have faith!”

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During the Pope’s General Audience yesterday, September 23, in Rome, Pope Benedict said that understanding God will never come from study alone — one must first believe.

Theologians and Christians who wish to deepen their faith “cannot count on just their intelligence, but must cultivate a profound experience of faith at the same time,” he said.

The Pope’s catechesis was dedicated to the life and teachings of St. Anselm of Canterbury, an 11th-century Benedictine and Doctor of the Church.

According to Anselm, Benedict explained, people who wish to better understand the Christian tradition can carry out “a healthy theological quest” by following three steps.

First, one must have faith, which is “a free gift from God to be welcomed with humility.”

The second step is experience, which entails incorporating the word of God in one’s everyday life.

The final step is “true understanding, which is never a result of ascetic reasoning, but of contemplative intuition,” Benedict said.

The Pope then cited St. Anselm’s most famous phrase: “Nor do I seek to understand that I may believe, but I believe so that I may understand.”

The Pope concluded by saying that Anselm showed how the journey to understand God is never fully complete, at least here on earth.

Source: Inside the Vatican Letter #30

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How do I continue getting closer to God?

Q: How do I continue getting closer to God?
I don’t need to be saved – I’m already there. But I am at a point where I feel like I should be doing more besides simply reading the Bible and listening to sermons and Christian music (which have helped me come a long way) – but I feel the need to do/experience more.

A: You redouble your efforts to remain faithfully and charitably involved in all of the work, worship, sacraments, and devotions of the authentic and universal Christian Church.

The fact that you believe you’re already “saved” is a good indication that you need to get to work on that as soon as possible.