Biblical Warning

warning

(2 Timothy 4:1-5) I charge thee, before God and Jesus Christ, who shall judge the living and the dead, by his coming and his kingdom: (2) Preach the word: be instant in season, out of season: reprove, entreat, rebuke in all patience and doctrine. (3) For there shall be a time when they will not endure sound doctrine but, according to their own desires, they will heap to themselves teachers having itching ears: (4) And will indeed turn away their hearing from the truth, but will be turned unto fables. (5) But be thou vigilant, labor in all things, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill thy ministry. Be sober.

Submitted by Bob Stanley, The Catholic Treasure Chest

Truth or friction?

The Catholic Church, since the time of the apostles, has preached the faith as the truth.  I have already quoted St. Peter to the effect that the apostles and their converts “were not following fictitious tales.”  Jesus Christ proved the truth of his assertions about himself by rising from the dead.  As St. Paul explains in Chapter 15 of his first epistle to the Corinthians, the resurrection of Christ was a matter that could be verified with eyewitnesses, not only the apostles, but many others, as well (cf. CCC 641-44).  In addition, the many prophecies that our Lord fulfilled by his birth, life and death, give further proof of the truth of the revelation committed by him to his Church (cf. CCC 156 and 522).  It is with arguments of this kind that we must defend the doctrines of the Catholic Church, not by seeking to prove that the Catholic religion is more useful than any other.

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Divine Truth or Cleverly Contrived Myth? How Catholics can tell the difference.

During the holy seasons of Easter and Christmas, Catholics are told that the pertinent events discussed in Sacred Scripture consist of “myth,” “mythological elements,” or “mythic roots.”

Never mind that many scholarly sources concede that it is difficult to define myth (cf. G. Kittel’s Theological Dictionary of the New Testament IV, 762-795). Further, critics say this “mythic” Scripture is not limited to the empty tomb and Incarnation but to all of Holy Writ.

This alleged relationship between Scripture and “myth” requires an analysis via the Holy Bible, Tradition, and the Magisterium of the Catholic Church.

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