The answers to three key Catholic questions speak volumes

questionOnce again let me stress that I developed this set of questions in the mid-1980s as a journalistic tool. The goal, when asking these questions, is to listen carefully to the answers.

It is especially interesting, of course, to note when people remain silence or try to find a way to maneuver around the questions without answering.

Different types of believers, of course, have different answers. The goal is to listen carefully and then respond with follow-up questions that yield nuggets of on-the-record doctrinal, as opposed to political, information. The goal is to transcend mere labels.

Here are those questions, once again:

(1) Are the biblical accounts of the resurrection of Jesus accurate? Did this event really happen?

(2) Is salvation found through Jesus Christ, alone? Was Jesus being literal when he said, “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. No one comes to the Father except through me” (John 14:6)?

(3) Is sex outside of the Sacrament of Marriage a sin?

Link to story

Catechist sacked for teaching Catholic truth

But let your speech be yea, yea: no, no:
and that which is over and above these,
is of evil.
(Matthew 5:37)

From California Catholic Daily

Last Wednesday, the day after the election, I spoke to the students about voting as Catholics first and shared the above non-negotiables with them.  A question came from a student asking “does this mean if you voted for Obama that you are not Catholic?”  I said that voting for a platform that supports intrinsic evil like that means you are not a “faithful Catholic.”

Read more

Inspirational Catholic Website: Pray the Mass.Org

Visit the site

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass

Submitted by AndyP/Doria2

Catholic blogger is likely much more successful than he knows

Middle of the night close collaboration for Christ

Like the grassroots instigators of John the Baptist and Jesus, I wait in my digital desert contemplating the perfect lifestyle demanded by God so that when the time comes, I will be ready to carry it out with ardent zeal.  Until then, my blog is my camel’s hair cassock, my facebook account is my feast of locusts and my 140 character limit tweets are my wild honey. Through these tools and through my daily routine, I grow in my relationship with Christ by recognizing His presence often.

Read more

Editor’s note: People tend to forget that Jesus personally reached only an infinitesimal portion of the earth’s population during his short, earthly existence … never traveling very far, and never writing more than a few letters in the sand. Yet Jesus saved countless generations.

Today’s Catholic bloggers have an opportunity to minister to people all around the globe, preaching the very same Gospel, announcing the very same good news, 24/7 and 365. Only God knows how all this will turn out, in the end … but isn’t that what faith is all about?

Scandals in the church

A Catholic Perspective

Answering Scandal with Personal Holiness
Fr. Roger J. Landry: Perhaps the single best commentary on the matter.

Tell Father You See Jesus
Bud Macfarlane: The attack on the twin towers of our faith.

The Catholic Bishops and the Scandals
Kenneth Whitehead: Why so many bishops ignore dissent.

A Close Look at Voice of the Faithful
Deal Hudson: “VOTF is simply another group of dissenters.”

The Bishop’s Secret Letter
Deal Hudson: Eight American bishops call for a Plenary Council.

Scapegoating and the Scandals
Father Richard John Neuhaus: Where there is no mercy, there is no hope.

The Deficiencies of the Bishop’s Policy
Charles Rice: Vague definitions leads to the intimidation or blackmail of priests.

Homosexuality, Dissent and Modernism – The Roots Of Abuse
“The bishops still don’t get it.”

See 20 more articles like this at CatholicCity.com

Pope quotes St. Ambrose, speaking about St. Joseph, the most chaste spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Quoting St. Ambrose, Benedict XVI commented that “in Joseph there was amiability and the figure of a just man to make the quality of his witness more worthy.”

The Pope noted that Joseph “did as the angel of the Lord ordered him,” and that he was “certain of doing the right thing.”

“Also,” he added, “giving the name ‘Jesus’ to that child who rules the entire universe, he enters into the ranks of the faithful and humble servants, like the angels and prophets, like the martyrs and the apostles — in the words of ancient eastern hymns. St. Joseph proclaims the wonders of the Lord, witnessing Mary’s virginity, the gratuitous deed of God, and caring for the earthly life of the Messiah.”

The Holy Father said that the Church “venerate[s] the legal father of Jesus, because the new man takes form in him, who looks to the future with confidence and courage, does not follow his own project, but entrusts himself totally to the infinite mercy of him who fulfills the prophecies and inaugurates the season of salvation.”

Read more

What is the Church? What are our responsibilities as members?

Q: What is the Church? What are our responsibilities as members?

A: The Church is a supernatural institution in which all the “People of God” continue to subsist.

The responsibility of every member of the Church is to remain faithful to God in all things, to love God, and love one another.

What in the Catholic church assures a home in Heaven one day?

Q: What in the Catholic church assures a home in Heaven one day?

A: The short answer is … Jesus!

Here’s the longer answer:

Once baptized, all a Catholic needs to do is make sure that at least a modicum of charity remains in his soul, at death.

1Co 13:1  If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal.
1Co 13:2  And if I should have prophecy and should know all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I should have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing.
1Co 13:3  And if I should distribute all my goods to feed the poor, and if I should deliver my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing.
1Co 13:4  Charity is patient, is kind: charity envieth not, dealeth not perversely, is not puffed up,
1Co 13:5  Is not ambitious, seeketh not her own, is not provoked to anger, thinketh no evil:
1Co 13:6  Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth with the truth:
1Co 13:7  Beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things.
1Co 13:8  Charity never falleth away: whether prophecies shall be made void or tongues shall cease or knowledge shall be destroyed.
1Co 13:9  For we know in part: and we prophesy in part.
1Co 13:10  But when that which is perfect is come, that which is in part shall be done away.
1Co 13:11  When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child. But, when I became a man, I put away the things of a child.
1Co 13:12  We see now through a glass in a dark manner: but then face to face. Now I know in part: but then I shall know even as I am known.
1Co 13:13  And now there remain faith, hope, and charity, these three: but the greatest of these is charity.

Catholics hope to ensure this through a lifetime of full, faithful, and charitable participation in all of the work, worship, sacraments, and devotions of the Church.

But anyone who believes they can be absolutely sure of their eternal destiny disrespects Jesus, the only judge.

Nobody is worthy of Heaven unless and until Jesus personally invites them in.

Catholics: What do you learn or do at church or home?

Q: Catholics: What do you learn or do at church or home?

I’m wondering, because I noticed that Catholics have a particular kind of spirit about them… and I like it.

A: Glad you noticed!

Catholics have a very rich and ancient Tradition based on Jesus, the apostles, and on the ultimate practicality of the authentic Christian faith, which never ceases to glorify God in spirit, and at the very same time, never fails to help perfect each faithful Catholic man and woman … body and soul … according to God’s abundant grace.

Whether practiced from infancy, or adopted later in life, it begins with Baptism, and it is fostered by a lifetime of full, faithful, and charitable participation in all of the work, worship, sacraments, and devotions of the Church.

The Catholic Church has always been known for superb theological scholarship and philosophy, available freely to all, which is easily translated into the types of cultural “norms” that ultimately define what every Catholic is called to be, by God.

The Catholic Church has also always been known for the real presence of Jesus Christ in the Holy Eucharist, which provides every Catholic with the motive, the means, and the opportunity to come to know and love God, in the most intimate possible way.

The bottom line is this: The Catholic faith is the most authentic, consistent, truthful, and practical faith that ever was, or ever will be … courtesy of Jesus Christ, who founded, authorized, empowered, and personally guaranteed his Church until the end of time, for the purpose of our salvation.

It doesn’t get any better than that, this side of Heaven … until Jesus comes again.

Will many Christians ever get past salvation and into understanding the kingdom of God?

Q: Will many Christians ever get past salvation and into understanding the kingdom of God?

A: Catholics “got past” mere salvation around 1600 years ago.

That’s probably why so many protestants seem to have such a hard time figuring what Catholics believe … and why.

The simple fact is, once baptized, works DO matter, since the foundation of the Kingdom of God is not built on good intentions, but on the heroic works of Jesus Christ, and all those who, according to his grace, choose to know, love, and faithfully follow him.