Father Corapi has many fans … but also many enemies.

With his ex-military persona and baritone, no nonsense lectures on traditional Catholic catechism, Corapi has won legions of fans, but also many enemies, especially from Catholics who prefer social justice sloganeering to faith and practice.

Corapi’s sudden suspension was triggered by the “Dallas Charter,” adopted by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops in 2002 to deal with priests accused of sexually abusing children. Pending investigation, the charter essentially sacks a priest from ministry.

“The policy the bishops have in place is to appropriately deal with crimes against children,” Manfredonia said. “I think if the policy is applied to those cases, absolutely it’s appropriate to suspend. But this situation, it’s not that. It’s a claim of sexual misconduct with adult women. It’s not a crime, it’s a sin.”

“If it happened, then it’s behavior unbecoming of a priest. We know father personally and have had eight conferences with him personally, and he’s a fighter. If these allegations were true, he would admit his failures, openly. I have no doubt about that. Even if the accusations are true, it does not diminish the truth of what he teaches from the Catechism, or the Catechism’s power, if preached with the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, to draw people back to the church.”

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Doug Lawrence apologizes: One of my recent Father Corapi articles may have inadvertently offended some good people.

In reference to an earlier article, entitled:
Will success spoil Father John Corapi?

It seems that I may have judged a bit too harshly and inadvertently offended some good people.

I hereby formally retract the last few lines of that article, and replace them with the following:

Now … about that late model BMW automobile that Father Corapi allegedly chooses to drive…

BMW’s may be perfectly good automobiles, but I personally think they are highly overrated!

(And now … BMW fans … please stop sending me those emails.)