The new Cosmos television series and the ongoing war between faith and science.

galaxy

“Everyone” knew the earth was the center of the universe?

Wow, who’s going to tell Copernicus? Kepler? Stigliola? Diggs? Maestlin? Rothmann? Brahe? All of them believed in models of the cosmos that were not considered orthodox, and lived at the time of Bruno. All of them escaped the fire, and indeed weren’t even pursued by the Inquisition. Right here we have the major lie at the heart of modern anti-religious scientific propaganda: the war between faith and science.

We’re supposed to just assume this ignorant backwards world of the past hates smart people. Tyson himself says it matter-of-factly: “How was [Bruno] spending New Year’s Eve [in 1599]? In prison, of course.”

Of course! Because that’s what the Church does to smart people! Bad church! Bad!

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Editor’s note: The truth is, there existed at the time, no way of scientifically proving or disproving many of the theories these men (including Galileo and his telescope) proposed. If our understanding of the Sacred Scriptures needed to be reinterpreted, the Church first demanded real proof. There was none – and there would not be for many, many years.

When people began to promote their unproven and as yet, unverifiable theories as dogma, the Church said no. When some of them persisted, they were sanctioned in various ways.

The rest of the truth is that many of the theories these men promoted eventually proved to be – at least in part – false and/or scientifically incorrect, in many aspects. Not surprising, since no way existed (at that time) to definitively prove or disprove them.

That’s something the pro-science/anti-church guys always seem to conveniently leave out!

Galileo was wrong: The Bible does not teach how the Heavens go … but rather, how to go to Heaven

Science, Galileo and the Catholic Church

  

KC history teacher has things bass-ackwards

John Veal, a lifelong Catholic and a history teacher, recently wrote:

There is simply no valid scriptural or theological basis for the celibate male clergy. Almost all other Christian churches rejected celibacy centuries ago. Many have also admitted women to their clergy. Yet Rome still condemns these changes as strongly as it once condemned Galileo’s proof of a sun-centered universe.

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Editor’s note: I beg to differ, Mr. history teacher and life-long Catholic. Jesus Christ is the theological basis for a celibate, all-male clergy … and due to the limited state of the scientific arts at the time, Galileo was totally unable to provide proof for his various scientific theories … several of which, as things eventually turned out, were wrong. As for “all the other Christian churches” … who cares what our poor, misguided, separated brethren decide to do? The Catholic Church alone remains the true church of Jesus Christ … and only the Catholic Church is qualified to claim the Holy Spirit as its infallible advocate and comforter.

Galileo was wrong: The Bible does not teach how the Heavens go … but rather, how to go to Heaven.
 

Science, Galileo and the Catholic Church

Science, Galileo and the Catholic Church

Many people assume that science and religion, especially the Catholic Church, are at odds. What are the facts? What is the true story of Galileo?

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Sorry Lucinda … you’re no Galileo.


An artist who had planned to create a sculpture from DVDs send out by Minnesota’s Catholic bishops said she was suspended from her position as the Basilica of St. Mary’s artist in residence. Lucinda Nayor’s project will take anti-gay marriage DVDs sent out to Catholics in advance of the November election and create a message of “creativity and hope.” While Naylor faces a setback at the basilica, she got a boost on Monday when other groups including one called Return The DVD, joined up with her project.

Naylor doesn’t want to dwell on the suspension from a position she’s held at the downtown Minneapolis basilica for 15 years, but says attention to it could help with her project. “It will draw more attention to the DVD to art project,” she told the Minnesota Independent on Sunday.

“Disappointed as I am by my suspension, I do not want to overly focus on it,” she wrote on her blog. “My primary focus remains on making a great piece of art.”

She said she was “startled and humbled to find that I join the ranks of people before me who been silenced or ousted one by one for disagreeing with the church.”

She added, “Maybe in 500 years, I, like Galileo, will get my suspension lifted.”

Link

Galileo was wrong: The Bible does not teach how the Heavens go … but rather, how to go to Heaven.


Lima, Peru, Aug 25, 2010 / 10:06 pm (CNA).- In an interview this week with the Peruvian daily El Comercio, physics expert Fr. Manuel Carreira clarified numerous and often misunderstood details about the life of Galileo, also touching on the relationship between faith and science.

The priest confirmed to El Comercio that Galileo “was a believer” and that, despite assumptions to the contrary, “he did not spend one minute behind bars … nor was he excommunicated.” Fr. Carreira added that Galileo “died professing the faith under the care of a religious sister and with a papal blessing.”

Fr. Carreira, who was in Lima for the Second Congress on the Holy Shroud of Turin, said that during Galileo’s time, there was no proof  that the Earth moved around the sun. “His supposed evidence was invalid,” the physicist noted, as well as dismissed by other astronomers.

Galileo’s correct idea, he explained, was that “the Bible does not teach science.” However, the famed astronomer “also wanted theologians to change their interpretation of the text according to his theory.” Although the theologians of his day “were mistaken in thinking that the Bible teaches astronomy,” the priest added, “they were correct in saying that as long as there was no evidence, Galileo should have presented his ideas as a theory and not ask them to change their opinions.”

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These are some of the things that make being a Catholic different.


For all its stumbling through history, despite the Renaissance popes who remain an embarrassment, the Crusades and persecutions and Galileo, forgetting the times it has failed because its members have failed, the Catholic Church has survived; its center has held. It has not petered out on a mountaintop waiting for the end of the world that didn’t come; it has not been confined to one nation like a domestic sport no other country understands; it has not foundered at the death of its leaders, nor even at the death of its founder from which point it springs.

The Catholic Church has survived. In all places, at all times, no matter the circumstances and pressures and purges, it has gone on because it is different. Papists and fish eaters, genuflecters, bead counters, and the ones who “have to go to church on Sunday,” Catholics have stood apart-figuratively as well as literally. Where separation was paranoid, it has, for the most part, been eliminated, but still the central sense remains, the sense that Catholics are different.

In a world of the wishy-washy, of temporary fads and passing interests, of momentary “in” things and the “latest” being hot for only a few weeks, the Catholic Church has lasted since its start 2,000 years ago-lasted and grown and held onto its soul. It has proven that it can stick- in the world or in an individual.

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