This Week’s Ask Alice: “3 Angels”



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Toni writes: A friend sent “3 angels” to my house through an email. My instructions were to make an altar with a candle, a white flower, an apple, and an envelope containing the names and addresses of 3 people who agreed to receive the angels after me, and my 3 wishes. I was told to light the candle for five days and talk to the angels so my wishes will come true.

But another friend told me that I’m calling up spirits, which is against the teachings of the Catholic Church. Now I am really scared! What should I do? Are the spirits really here? Are there demons in my home now? Will they not leave? Can I just ignore the actions I began as false superstition and throw away the candle or just burn it down? What should I do with my dozen white roses?

Alice responds: Sorry, Toni, but you’d better blow out that candle and burn those roses. The “3 angels” are, at best, useless superstitions and, at worst, could conjure up evil spirits in your home. The “3 angels” email was started by Irmi, a German psychic. Catholics, Protestants, Jews, and Muslims are cautioned against having any contact with psychics, mediums and spiritualists.

“Whoever sacrifices to any god, except to the Lord alone, shall be doomed” (Exodus 22:19)

The spirits invoked by psychics are usually demonic ones. At seances, demonic spirits often appear to mediums disguised as good spirits. As a fallen archangel, Satan, the Deceiver, has appeared to people in the image of saints, even the Virgin Mary. Catholics should avoid all occult practices such as Wiccan rituals, playing with Ouija boards, Tarot cards, attending a seance or visiting a psychic. Also, Catholics should not forward chain letters … be they email or postal.

What should you do with any remaining superstitious stuff at your house? You should burn the 12 roses, 3 wishes, 3 names and addresses, and the candle, then dispose of all the ashes.

Before posting my reply, I discussed your dilemma with Fr. Jerome Kish, Pastor of St. Joseph Church in Downers Grove, IL. Fr. Kish said that you should also remember to mention the “3 angels” incident during your next Confession.

Don’t be afraid, Toni. You didn’t realize what you were doing.  There will likely be no demons lingering in your home after you destroy all the associated Irmi articles. If you want to do a good deed, albeit a difficult one, please tell the friend who sent you the “3 angels” what I’ve shared with you.

It’s always wise to keep Holy Water in your house, so you can bless yourself and then sprinkle it both indoors and out, should spiritual difficulties arise. It’s also good policy to keep sacramentals (blessed sacred objects) such as rosaries, crucifixes, miraculous medals, etc. in your home.

As a baptized Catholic, you are marked with the sign of your faith. You belong to God, so you need not fear anything or anybody.

“As for you, every hair of your head has been counted; so do not be afraid of anything.” (Matthew 10:30-31)

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

Useful info about real angels (submitted by Doria2)

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German theologian says Catholic Church needs a revolution if it is to survive

Kung compared the changes needed in the Catholic church to the democratic changes taking place in the Arab world."When will in our church the youth take to the street? That is our problem; we have no young people anymore," he said to laughter from the 350 people present.

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Benedict XVI’s latest book is more modernist, Protestant fantasy than authentic, Catholic truth.

I’ve finally figured out why the Pope, in the introduction to his latest book, grants that everyone is free to disagree with any of the opinions contained therein.

This pope long ago succumbed to the vacuous, modernist theology of his fellow, radical Germans, and he obviously no longer accepts the dogmatic Catholic truths that, along with Jesus Christ, serve as the very foundation of the Catholic faith.

The scary thing is … most Catholics view Benedict XVI as a traditionalist … just like his illustrious predecessor.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Simply go back and read his extensive collection of published works. Then, there will be no doubt!

Radical German “Theologians” Conjure Up Tired Old “Spirit of Vatican II” (Again).

In anticipation of Pope Benedict XVI’s forthcoming visit to his homeland, more than 200 German theologians — men and women who have earned doctoral degrees in theology and teach in German universities — have issued a manifesto, “The Church in 2011: A Necessary Departure.” The manifesto itself does not identify the destination for which the Church is to depart, but the terminus ad quem seems reasonably clear from a careful reading of the document: Catholicism is to transform itself into another liberal Protestant sect by conceding virtually every point at issue between classic Christianity and the ambient culture of the postmodern West.

It is, perhaps, no surprise to find German Catholic theologians publicly supporting the ordination of married men and women to the ministerial priesthood (overtly), same-sex “marriage” (slyly), and full communion within the Church for those in irregular marriages (subtly but unmistakably). These causes have been espoused for years. German theologians dissented en masse from the 1993 teaching of Veritatis Splendor on the nature of moral acts and from the 1994 teaching of Ordinatio Sacerdotalis on the Church’s inability to admit women to Holy Orders. What was particularly striking about this new manifesto was its attempt to address serious problems with tried-and-failed solutions. That bespeaks a remarkable lack of intellectual creativity and historical sense.

Read more from George Weigel

Bultmann’s (not so) ‘great accomplishment’: Turning historical Biblical events into myth while claiming to “de-mythologize” them.

The modernist re-interpreters of the gospel were seemingly well intended. They wanted to rid the New Testament of it’s primitive, first century supernaturalism–believing that this would make the gospel accessible for modern people. What the goof balls didn’t understand is that modern people–just like people in the first century–actually want their religion to be supernatural. That’s what religion is all about. Taking the supernatural out of religion is like playing tennis without the net.

Read more

Jim Akin: Easter A Pagan Holiday? Not a chance!

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Q: Isn’t Easter a pagan rather than a Christian holiday, as shown by its very name by the fact that its date is determined by the full moon after the Spring equinox?


A: By Jim Akin – Anyone making this charge shows a total lack of comprehension of global Christianity. In fact, only a person speaking English or German could even possibly make this charge.
First, let’s deal with the date. Easter is the first Sunday after the first full moon following March 21 (historically, the Spring equinox).

The reason, however, has nothing to do with paganism. It has everything to do with Judaism and with Christ’s Resurrection.

Christ was resurrected on Sunday — the first day of the week (Matthew 28:1) — thus since the First Council of Nicaea in A.D. 325 all Christians have celebrated his Resurrection on Sunday.

Prior to that, most celebrated it on Sunday, but some, known as Quartodecimians (“Fourteenth-ers”) celebrated it on the 14th day of the Jewish month of Nisan, when Passover occurred.

At First Nicaea all Christians agreed to celebrate the Resurrection of Christ on first Sunday after 14 Nisan because that
was the day Christ was Resurrected in the first century — the Sunday after Passover.

Because first century Jews used a lunar calendar, every month was twenty-eight days long, beginning with the new moon and having the full moon on the 14th of the month. Nisan, being the month in which the Spring equinox occurred, always had Passover — the 14th of Nisan — falling on the first full moon on or after the Spring equinox.

Thus since Passover was always on or after the first full moon after the Spring equinox, and since the Resurrection was the first Sunday after Passover, Easter is always the first Sunday after the first full moon after March 21 (historically, the Spring equinox).

There is nothing about a pagan lunar celebration in here. It has nothing to do with paganism, but everything to do with the Resurrection of Christ in its Jewish-Passover context.

Now let us deal with the name of Easter.

The fact is that there are only two languages in which the name has any pagan associations whatsoever
— English and German.

This, of course, is a problem for King James Only-ites, since the term “Easter” appears in the King James Version in
Acts 12:4 as a translation for the Jewish holiday of Passover. In English, of course, the name is “Easter” and in German “Ostern.”

These are related in name to a pagan spring festival, whose name, if you check a dictionary, was derived from the prehistoric West Germanic word akin to the Old English term east, which means, simply enough, “east,” the direction of the rising sun.

It has nothing to do, contrary to what you will hear from some anti-Easter-ites, with the goddess Ishtar.

But in virtually every language except English and German, the name of Easter is derived from the Jewish word Pesach or “Passover.”

Thus in Greek the term for Easter is Pascha, in Latin the term is also Pascha.

From there it passed into the Romance languages, and so in Spanish it is Pascua, in Italian it is Pasqua, in French it is Paques, and in Portugese it is Pascoa.

It also passed into the non-Romance languages, such as the Germanic languages Dutch, where it is Pasen and Danish,
where it is Paaske.

Thus only in the highly Protestant countries of Germany (where the Reformation started) and England (where the intense persecution and martyrdom of Catholics was the harshest), does the term “Easter” have any pagan associations at all.

So perhaps in these two Protestant countries paganism was not sufficiently stamped out to use the Judeo-Christian term
for the celebration of Christ’s Resurrection that was used everywhere else in Europe.

Submitted by Doria2