A short, 12 point study on the Holy Trinity

holytrinitylogo

The Church teaches that the Holy Trinity
is the central mystery
of the Christian Faith.

But how much do you know about this mystery?

What is its history?

What does it mean?

And how can it be proved?

Here are 12 things to know and share . . .

1. Where does the word “Trinity” come from?

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Trinity Sunday: Simple mathematical equation explains the sacred reality of the Holy Trinity.

trincross


1 x 1 x 1 = 1

A text-based explanation from the Catholic Encyclopedia at New Advent.com:

The Blessed Trinity

This article is divided as follows:

The moral obligation to participate in the eucharistic sacrifice on Sundays dates from the very beginning of Christianity.

MASSsummit

The obligation to attend Sunday Mass exists. It is a commandment of the Church which binds under the penalty of grave sin. It exists for a specific reason and should be known and loved, so that the soul feels a need to fulfill it. The fact that it is a law helps to create a religious consciousness of this need, which, in turn, makes it easier to fulfill the obligation.

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Pope on the Holy Trinity: “the only context in which the believer can be in full communion with Christ is the Church and her living Tradition.”

The Pope acknowledged that Christian monotheism builds on the faith of Judaism. But with the incarnation of Jesus, this faith “came to be illuminated with a completely new light: the light of the Trinity, a mystery which also illuminates brotherhood among men.”

Pope Benedict next addressed the question of how scholars can identify authentically Catholic thought. He observed that many Christians take the Bible as the ultimate source of authority, but said that reliance on Scripture, while necessary, is not sufficient.

“The Bible is always necessarily read in a certain context,” the Pope said, “and the only context in which the believer can be in full communion with Christ is the Church and her living Tradition.”

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Libs just “hate” the word “consubstantial” in the new Mass translation

“There are a lot of people upset by the changes, and the process by which the changes were made,” said Tom Kyle, 72, a Catholic from Farmington who says the church should be more open. “There is a lot of resistance from the clergy. A lot of the priests don’t like it.”

The word “consubstantial” is one example of what Kyle says represents a backward step for the church.

“Technically, it’s correct, but people don’t know what ‘consubstantial’ means,” Kyle said. “It doesn’t make any sense for many. And it doesn’t have the same flow.”

Link

Editor’s note-

Dear Mr. Kyle:

Consubstantial means that Jesus Christ, like all the members of the Holy Trinity, is of one and the same eternal, uncreated, divine essence … i.e. substance. (You remember … God from God. Light from Light. True God from True God?)

Since God made us to know him, love him, and serve him … in this world … and in the next … there’s absolutely nothing “backward” about developing a deeper understanding of the divine nature … especially at Mass.

A more complete treatment of the subject can be found here,  and here, in the venerable Catholic Encyclopedia.

Now that we’ve put that behind us, why not just relax and worship God in spirit and truth, the way it was always supposed to have been done?

Sincerely,

Doug Lawrence
Just Another Faithful Catholic

Making the Sign of the Cross is absolutely ancient, rooted not only in the Old Testament but the New.

The Catholic Sign of the Cross is absolutely ancient, rooted not only in the Old Testament but the New (Apocalypse speaks of those who have the sign of God in their foreheads — and those who have the sign of the Beast in their foreheads).

When Catholics undergo the Sacrament of Confirmation, the Bishop (sometimes a priest) seals the sign on our foreheads with holy chrism. St. John of Damascus wrote:

This was given to us as a sign on our forehead,
just as the circumcision was given to Israel:
for by it we believers are separated and distinguished from unbelievers.

Crossing one’s self recalls this seal, and the invocation that is said while making this holy sign calls on our God — the Father, His Son, and the Holy Ghost — and is a sign of our of belief; it is both a “mini-creed” that asserts our belief in the Triune God, and a prayer that invokes Him.

The use of holy water when making this sign, such as we do when we enter a church, also recalls our Baptism and should bring to mind that we are born again of water and Spirit, thanks be to God.

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Submitted by Doria2

An excellent explanation of what Catholics believe about the Holy Trinity (and why)

In history, God prepared the human family for this revelation of Himself. The pinnacle of the preparation was the Jewish religion. It seems that a lot of Old Testament history is made up of God drumming into the heads of the Israelites that the various idol gods of the nations were unrealities, or as St. Paul would later have it, demons (1 Cor 10: 20), and that He is the only true God. Although, even so, Jewish scripture contained many “hints” of the unity-in-diversity of God (Gen. 1: 26; 11: 7, 19: 18-24; Ps. 110: 1; Is. 6: 1-3; Zech. 3: 1,2).

God also prepared the human family for revelation of Himself through the Hellenization of the Jews. The Diaspora was no accident (Duet 32: 8). The Church would need the language of Greek philosophy to express herself about Christ. Regarding St. John’s use of the Greek term “Logos” in John 1:1, Romano Guardini wrote: “In order that this conception of the Logos, idea and source of all ideas, stand ready to serve sacred Christology, Greek thought labored for six centuries” (The Lord, p. 538).

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