Holy water: “Industrial-strength spiritual Lysol.”

Part of an interview with a former Satanist:

CWR: How would you advise the faithful to keep the devil out of their lives?

Deborah: First of all, in this life he’s always going to be in your life and close by. So, you have to protect yourself by going to Mass and receiving the Eucharist. It’s powerful protection. Holy water is extremely effective. I call it “industrial-strength spiritual Lysol.” I keep it in my home and regularly bless myself.

The sacrament of confession is important. One of the fastest ways for the demon to enter our lives is through unconfessed sin. I freely tell people, Catholic or not, that the Catholic Church is the only church that has the tools to deal effectively with the demonic. That includes devotion to the Blessed Mother.

Also, be careful about your hobbies and entertainment. The drinking, partying, carousing lifestyle can create an opening for the devil to come in; I also recommend people avoid slasher movies.

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7 Tradiitonal Steps to a Proper Catholic Home

1. The King of the Catholic Home

It has been said that the Catholic home should be seen as “The Domestic Church”. With this being said, the Father is the head, the Mother is the beloved spouse, and the children are brought up learning to love and serve the Blessed Trinity. The true head of the Catholic home is Christ, just as the Head of the Church is the Supreme Pontiff, His Holiness. Christ should be known and recognized in each Catholic home as King; the family’s week should be centered around the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and prayer is a must.

2. Proper Prayers

Parents should encourage their children to pray to the Lord Our God, The Blessed Virgin, and the Saints in their own words as well as the traditional prayers of the Church.

Prayers of the Rosary: Sign of the Cross, Apostles’ Creed, Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory Be, and Fatima Prayer

The Nicene Creed

Blessing before and after meals

Prayer to Guardian Angel

Act of Contrition

Act of Faith

Act of Hope

Act of Charity

Hail, Holy Queen

St. Michael prayer

The Eternal Rest Prayer

The parents are encouraged to also teach these prayers to their children in Latin as well.

“The day the Church abandons her universal tongue [Latin] is the day before she returns to the catacombs” — Pope Pius XII

3. Holy Water

Prayer can be encouraged through the most minor of things, such as placing Holy Water fonts in bedrooms and ones main door. All Catholics should know the use and purpose of Holy Water, St. Teresa of Avila says:

“…There is nothing like holy water to put devils to flight and prevent them from coming back again. They also flee from the cross, but return; so holy water must have great value.”

Parents too should bless their own children with Holy Water, by signing them on their foreheads. Lastly, each child should have a Blessed (by a priest) Crucifix in their bedrooms above their beds. The child should be taught to kneel when rising and going to bed and say their prayers with their parents.

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This Week’s Ask Alice: “3 Angels”



Send A Question To Alice

She’ll answer your Catholic questions
right here, every Thursday.

Email responses will also be provided, as time permits.

Toni writes: A friend sent “3 angels” to my house through an email. My instructions were to make an altar with a candle, a white flower, an apple, and an envelope containing the names and addresses of 3 people who agreed to receive the angels after me, and my 3 wishes. I was told to light the candle for five days and talk to the angels so my wishes will come true.

But another friend told me that I’m calling up spirits, which is against the teachings of the Catholic Church. Now I am really scared! What should I do? Are the spirits really here? Are there demons in my home now? Will they not leave? Can I just ignore the actions I began as false superstition and throw away the candle or just burn it down? What should I do with my dozen white roses?

Alice responds: Sorry, Toni, but you’d better blow out that candle and burn those roses. The “3 angels” are, at best, useless superstitions and, at worst, could conjure up evil spirits in your home. The “3 angels” email was started by Irmi, a German psychic. Catholics, Protestants, Jews, and Muslims are cautioned against having any contact with psychics, mediums and spiritualists.

“Whoever sacrifices to any god, except to the Lord alone, shall be doomed” (Exodus 22:19)

The spirits invoked by psychics are usually demonic ones. At seances, demonic spirits often appear to mediums disguised as good spirits. As a fallen archangel, Satan, the Deceiver, has appeared to people in the image of saints, even the Virgin Mary. Catholics should avoid all occult practices such as Wiccan rituals, playing with Ouija boards, Tarot cards, attending a seance or visiting a psychic. Also, Catholics should not forward chain letters … be they email or postal.

What should you do with any remaining superstitious stuff at your house? You should burn the 12 roses, 3 wishes, 3 names and addresses, and the candle, then dispose of all the ashes.

Before posting my reply, I discussed your dilemma with Fr. Jerome Kish, Pastor of St. Joseph Church in Downers Grove, IL. Fr. Kish said that you should also remember to mention the “3 angels” incident during your next Confession.

Don’t be afraid, Toni. You didn’t realize what you were doing.  There will likely be no demons lingering in your home after you destroy all the associated Irmi articles. If you want to do a good deed, albeit a difficult one, please tell the friend who sent you the “3 angels” what I’ve shared with you.

It’s always wise to keep Holy Water in your house, so you can bless yourself and then sprinkle it both indoors and out, should spiritual difficulties arise. It’s also good policy to keep sacramentals (blessed sacred objects) such as rosaries, crucifixes, miraculous medals, etc. in your home.

As a baptized Catholic, you are marked with the sign of your faith. You belong to God, so you need not fear anything or anybody.

“As for you, every hair of your head has been counted; so do not be afraid of anything.” (Matthew 10:30-31)

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

Useful info about real angels (submitted by Doria2)

Click here to see all of Alice’s other columns

The Power of Holy Water, From the Autobiography of St. Teresa of Avila

Holy water: Numbers 5:17,8:7, Ezekiel 47:12

The Power of Holy Water,
From the Autobiography of St. Teresa of Avila,
Chapter 31, 1562 A.D…

“From long experience I have learned that there is nothing like holy water to put devils to flight and prevent them from coming back again. They also flee from the Cross, but return; so holy water must have great virtue. For my own part, whenever I take it, my soul feels a particular and most notable consolation. In fact, it is quite usual for me to be conscious of a refreshment which I cannot possibly describe, resembling an inward joy which comforts my whole soul. This is not fancy, or something which has happened to me only once. It has happened again and again and I have observed it most attentively. It is let us say, as if someone very hot and thirsty were to drink from a jug of cold water: he would feel the refreshment throughout his body. I often reflect on the great importance of everything ordained by the Church and it makes me very happy to find that those words of the Church are so powerful that they impart their power to the water and make it so very different from water which has not been blessed.”

Holy water is mentioned in the Bible in Numbers 5:17.

“One night, too, about this time, I thought the devils were stifling me; and when the nuns had sprinkled a great deal of holy water about I saw a huge crowd of them running away as quickly as though they were about to fling themselves down a steep place.”

“I will only describe something that happened to me one night of All Souls. I was in an oratory: I had said one nocturn and was repeating some very devotional prayers which follow it — they are extremely devotional: we have them in our office-book — when actually the devil himself alighted on the book, to prevent me from finishing the prayer. I made the sign of the Cross and he went away. I then began again and he came back. I think I began that prayer three times and not until I had sprinkled some holy water on him could I finish it. At the same moment I saw several souls coming out of purgatory: their time there must have been nearly up and I thought that perhaps the devil was trying to impede their deliverance.”

Exodus 40:12-16, Leviticus 14:49-53,15:7-11,16:23-24, Numbers 5:16-17,8:7,19:17-19, 2Kings 2:20-22 (salt is added to holy water), Psalms 51:2,7

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More about holy water

Submitted by Bob Stanley

Removing Holy Water from fonts during Lent IS NOT permitted!

This is a response from the Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments about this question. Enjoy.

The emphases are mine:

Prot. N. 569/00/L

March 14, 2000

Dear Father:

This Congregation for Divine Worship has received your letter sent by fax in which you ask whether it is in accord with liturgical law to remove the Holy Water from the fonts for the duration of the season of Lent.

This Dicastery is able to respond that the removing of Holy Water from the fonts during the season of Lent is not permitted, in particular, for two reasons:

1. The liturgical legislation in force does not foresee this innovation, which in addition to being praeter legem is contrary to a balanced understanding of the season of Lent, which though truly being a season of penance, is also a season rich in the symbolism of water and baptism, constantly evoked in liturgical texts.

2. The encouragement of the Church that the faithful avail themselves frequently of the [sic] of her sacraments and sacramentals is to be understood to apply also to the season of Lent. The “fast” and “abstinence” which the faithful embrace in this season does not extend to abstaining from the sacraments or sacramentals of the Church. The practice of the Church has been to empty the Holy Water fonts on the days of the Sacred Triduum in preparation of the blessing of the water at the Easter Vigil, and it corresponds to those days on which the Eucharist is not celebrated (i.e., Good Friday and Holy Saturday).

Hoping that this resolves the question and with every good wish and kind regard, I am,

Sincerely yours in Christ,
[signed]
Mons. Mario Marini [Later, the Secretary of the Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei, now with God.]
Undersecretary

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What’s so special about a Roman Catholic priest? (A must read!)

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Father Clement Machado – Are you a consumer of priests?

By JesusBeWithUs

Published August 17th, 2009

Say the word missionary and many think of a devoted priest hacking his way through a jungle to spread the Word of God.

Now meet Father Clement Machado—a modern missionary hacking his way through secular 21st century America, clouded Catholic thinking and even the work of the devil.

If you’re fortunate enough to hear him tell how the Blessed Virgin Mary visited him at the age of 11, you’ll learn that Mary showed him a vision of Hell and then of Heaven. He knew then that he was going to be a priest.

Father Machado—missionary, exorcist and a surprisingly humble and humorous priest—spoke before a crowd of around 450 on Sunday, Aug. 9th on the Roman Catholic priesthood and Pope Benedict’s declaration of the Year for Priests. He emphasized the year was for priests, not of priests. A year to pray for and celebrate the gift that God has given us through His priests.

What’s so special about a Roman Catholic priest?

The secular mass media, masters of distraction and confusion, as well as hell-bound Hollywood, often portray Roman Catholic priests as very ’special’ people—typically alcoholics, deviants, or pedophiles.

And many religious Protestants are no better, spreading vile anti-Catholicism—calling Pope John Paul II the Anti-Christ or ignorantly claiming that Roman Catholics worship idols. You would be hard pressed to find a Southern Baptist who thought a Catholic priest was equal to one of their ministers. And in a way, they’re very right. Priests are not the equals of Protestant ministers as you’ll see in a bit.

But worse than either Hollywood or the Protestants, both of whom you’d expect such attitudes and behavior from, are Catholics who are blessed to have priests, yet treat them only as a commodity, and not the special gift from God that priests are.

If Catholic priests aren’t so special, why does holy water do the job?

Father Machado quickly cleared through earthly media clutter and Protestant errors in thinking by recounting two recent events in his life—one involving the possessed daughter of a Protestant minister, another other involving an inmate in a New England prison, and another about life imitating art.

His point in telling these stories was to call attention to the fact that there is indeed something very special about a priest.

Holy water or Wally Water?

While visiting Kansas City recently, someone brought the misery of a Protestant minister to Father Machado’s attention. The minister’s young daughter was possessed and her father (let’s call him Wally) prayed fervently for her deliverance. He tried blessing water to drive the demon out, but the Wally Water didn’t work.

Desperate to help his daughter, the minister sneaked into a Catholic church for some Holy Water, brought it home and guess what? The demon in his daughter reacted immediately—and not so happily—to the Holy Water! A true Catholic exorcism was eventually performed and the daughter, freed now, is able to be a normal little girl again.

But was that the end of the story? Not quite. Minister Wally is now training to become a Catholic priest. True story!

Call a doctor (of the church), now!

Another account described how while in New England, Father Machado came across the plight of local prisoner. As Father Machado told it, a psychiatrist was called by the warden of a local prison who begged the psychiatrist to visit, but wouldn’t tell the doctor why.

The psychiatrist arrived and was led to a prison cell, where he saw a prisoner levitating in the center of his cell. The psychiatrist turned to the warden and said, “What do you expect me to do? You don’t need a psychiatrist, you need a priest!”

Fake priest, fake priest!

Even Hollywood is occasionally reminded that there is something very special about Catholic priests.

Father Machado told the story of a recent filming of an attempted exorcism performed by a Catholic priest.

The camera crew didn’t know the priest had a secret.

But the demoniac did.

As the cameras rolled, the demoniac turned and mocked the ‘exorcist’ yelling, ” Fake priest, fake priest, hahaha!” stunning everyone involved. It turned out that unbeknown to the filming crew the priest was an impostor. And Satan knew it.

Dial 1-800-PRIESTS?

Recalling Christ as Altar, Victim, and High Priest, Father Machado urged the crowd to avoid the secular trap of thinking of Christ, or His priests, as mere counselors or psychologists.

“The priesthood is a supernatural calling,” he said. “Christ the Priest is walking in our midst when we see a priest.” And that, he said, is a major difference between a Protestant minister and a Roman Catholic priest. Protestant ministers are symbols, whereas Christ is truly present in the priesthood.

This thinking is paralled, he said, when a Protestant considers the bread and wine a symbol, and Roman Catholics know that Christ is truly present in the Eucharist.

And this difference, symbolism vs. reality, is why only a Roman Catholic priest or bishop or above can truly exorcise salt and then water. And that is why a demon knows the difference when an exorcism is being performed (see sidebar).

Father Machado’s pointed out that in the declaration of the Year for Priests, Pope Benedict XVI said that “God is the only treasure which ultimately people desire to find in a priest.”

Rearrange that sentence and you can see three points the Pope is making in that one small sentence:

People are desiring something,

God is that desire, that treasure, who people are looking for,

And He can be found IN a priest.

Father Machado said to remember that the next time you see your parish priest. Your parish priest is not a psychologist or counselor. He’s not just a buddy to be invited over for a quick meal. He is a MAN OF GOD.

God is in and around your parish priest, he said. When a priest blesses you, your home or your car (and you should ask for all three!), it is Christ Himself flowing through your priest. When a priests baptises your child, God is working through your priest. When a priest celebrates Mass, Christ is there with him as the ultimate Priest, as well as being the Altar and Victim.

If you truly realize the supernatural nature of the priesthood, Father Machado said, it will change how you think and act around your priests.

Father Machado even went as far to say you can tell a good Catholic from bad simply by the way they treat a priest—do you think of your local priests and church as yet another service to be consumed, like that of a dentist, a school teacher, a postal worker, or God forbid a housecleaner?

“A priest is a sign to remind people of God, of the Sacred,” he said, not to be used or consumed and then not thought about until you need the priest or church again.

If you just show up to church on Sundays, you’re a consumer, he says. If you speak of priests in “pedestrian or blasé language,” you’re ignoring the sacred within them.

Yes, Father Machado said, a priest is human just like you and I. A priest is a sinner too, just like you and I.

But there is also something special about a priest too. Someone—Christ—is working through them. Just ask any demoniac. Or anyone who has been healed.

“Too many people treat priests and even the sacraments,” Father Machado said, “as commodities to be consumed.”

I know we have many consumers in our local parish. I’m always astounded as parishioners run for the exits, jostling with the priest as he makes his way for the door, desperately trying to get outside and greet the departing faithful! Too bad they’re already in their cars headed for the next shopping event.

(Father Clement Machado, a missionary of the Society of our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity (SOLT), is well known on five continents for his apostolic preaching, evangelization and healing ministries. His apostolate also includes radio and television work, most notably appearances on Mother Angelica’s EWTN and Vatican Radio.)

The event mentioned above, Marantha “Come Lord Jesus,” was held Sunday, August 9th, at Georgetown Preparatory School in Bethesda, Maryland. Mrs. Vickie Schneider and her husband sponsored the event, with many wonderful families from two cenacles in Maryland volunteering their time and efforts.

Give us more Holy Priests who are willing to preach on Sin and the need for Confession for the healing of our Souls and bodies.

Submitted by Bob Stanley, with thanks to Father Mark Wheelan

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“Holy water should not be in fonts during this epidemic”

water-21

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