For more than 1900 years, the serenity and peace of the Catholic Faith and the certainty of the Church’s immutable doctrine were widely recognized as products of the fullness of divine grace and truth, which she alone possessed.

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But now all has changed… dreadful days have come upon us which the appeasing rhetoric of modernized Christians cannot hide: the Revolution of the atheist world has entered the Church and is wearing everything down.

There is no longer any stability and the Church appears to have entered into a perennial Revolution which changes everything continuously: confusion in the rites, confusion in doctrine, confusion in morals, confusion in discipline.

You do not know if the truth of today will be the same tomorrow. Many, priests and faithful, rush around anxiously in order not to be left behind, adapting themselves in whatever way they can, to this wearisome confusion.

The one who is truly seeking God in this revolutionary Church, is left frightfully alone.

What to do in this suffocating atmosphere? And what not to do?

First of all, it is important not to be beset by agitation, it is important not to react like revolutionaries: that would be like treating a disease, which is precisely what the Revolution is, with the same illness. The revolutionary spirit, even when it pretends to save the good, will never be the solution.

Instead, it is essential to stay really outside of the Revolution, by living Catholicism integrally in the stability that was there, before the Revolution invaded everything.

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Editor’s note: Vatican II is what happens when God finally steps aside and permits the men who run the Catholic Church to pursue all the desires of their hearts.

Why Mosquitoes Can’t Transmit HIV

Mosquitoes function the same way as hypodermic needles though — They can both inject chemicals and extract blood. And if mosquitoes carry West Nile Virus and other blood-borne diseases, shouldn’t they logically be able to transmit HIV, too?

Thankfully, we were reassured that that’s not the case. Mosquitoes can not transmit HIV.

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RIP: Annette Funicello, Catholic

…I’m a Catholic, and I’ve always been a religious person, and having MS reminds me that there’s a higher power up there who knows what HE’s doing. MS has brought my family closer together, if that’s possible.

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Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted has issued new advance medical directives to help Catholics better understand the Church’s teaching on end-of-life issues and to provide guidance to caregivers.

Dr. Frank Agnone, a Catholic internal medicine physician, has stood many times at the bedside of patients facing the end of their lives. He said the advance directives issued by the Phoenix Diocese are based on the magisterial teaching of the Church and will be a big help to the faithful.

“None of us is equipped to put something this profound and this insightful together about human nature and natural law as God would have us live it out in His plan for creation, redemption and our salvation,” Dr. Agnone said, “but the Magisterium of our Church has and it makes so much sense.”

Dr. Agnone said the time during which patients and their families face the end of life is sacred and shouldn’t be rushed.

“We want to create the most sacred environment in which to finish the journey,” Dr. Agnone said. “We don’t prolong death but we respect that there are still some final chapters, some final moments of this life that can be carefully observed.”

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Amazing story: The death of a saint and Eucharistic Viaticum – “Food for the Journey”.

When St. Juliana was in her last moments of life, and the priest was called to bring her the Blessed Sacrament as Viaticum, it was determined that she would not be able to receive on account of constant vomiting. She, however, begged the priest to spread a corporal upon her chest and to lay the Host upon it.

After the priest did this, in the sight of all present, St. Juliana became radiant and the Host suddenly disappeared – having been miraculously received into her body as the “food for her journey” into eternal life.

Read more from the New Theological Movement

Garvan Byrne died at the age of 11 after a long illness, but he left behind an amazing and inspiring video for people of faith.

Click here … and have the Kleenex ready

I don’t know if Garvan Byrnes is worthy of sainthood.  But it seems to me that the Church should consider investigating his life and death to see if he is worthy of  being named a “Servant of God.”  From there, God will decide how high this young man should rise on that scale of sanctity.   It may all come down to whether God permits miracles to be permitted when people petition Garvan in the name of Jesus.

Thanks to Te Deum laudamus!

Christian doctor explains: How to distinguish between natural disorders and the demonic.

In Dr. Rambally’s opinion, you first see what the person’s reaction is to the Name of Jesus (obviously, a demonic case will bring about a violent reaction). Demonized people — like the aforementioned woman — show supernatural strength (or knowledge).

The demonized will not repeat the Name of Jesus or read from Scripture. And while demon possession may pass from one person to another, mental illness usually does not. Meanwhile, a case of the demonic may involve the fingers twisting, when in fact a normal human can’t twist the fingers in such a way, sane or insane.

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Brief editorial in light of the recent Father Corapi announcement and all the other sad, weird things transpiring in the Catholic Church, these days.

by Doug Lawrence

If I thought the Catholic Church was just another corporate entity, I would have “sold all my stock” and “washed my hands of it” many, many years ago.

It’s not. So I didn’t.

I think Father Corapi has indeed been wronged, is suffering from some sort of illness, is not in his right mind, and is in need of our continued prayers, assistance and support … not in starting up a new organization … but in being once again reconciled with the church, his religious order, and the Catholic ministerial priesthood.

It would be a real shame and a grave sin to do anything less.

I have faith that someone in authority will step up to champion this process. And at this point, it doesn’t matter whether the allegations against Father Corapi are ever substantiated or refuted. Reconciliation is what’s necessary … and in the Catholic Church, reconciliation has never required judgment, or even a definitive finding of fault.

In fact, the opposite is true.

God is willing to forgive as soon as we admit that we may have fallen short, that we are truly sorry for all of our failures, and we resolve to make a good faith effort to try to do better, in the future. Reconciliation eliminates the need for judgment, clearing the way so grace can supernaturally operate, for the benefit of the whole church. That’s the beauty of it!

Why should we, who are encouraged to imitate Jesus Christ in word and deed, even attempt to apply any other standard to the Corapi affair?

The man Corapi has been a good and faithful priest for twenty years. Preaching the truth in a particularly effective way, he has brought countless souls to Jesus Christ. The allegations made against him are not particularly outrageous or grievous. Certainly not unforgivable! How is it then, that we all seem to be willing to throw in the towel, pridefully retreat to our respective corners, claim victory, and simply walk away?

If all parties involved in this mess can’t get together and sign-on to a joint, traditionally Catholic reconciliation strategy, then perhaps my assessment of the supernatural nature of the Catholic Church is wrong after all, the Body of Christ is in much worse shape than anyone ever suspected, and it’s time to do some strategic short-selling.

God, help us gracefully recover from this terrible scandal. Please!

Complete article summary and chronology of the Father Corapi affair

“Little” Miracles: Totally Unexpected, Supernatural Healing.

By Doug Lawrence

A number of years ago, a sick friend asked me to go along with her and her husband to a charismatic Catholic healing Mass. I figured that any Mass is a good Mass, and it also occurred to me that I could provide at least some additional spiritual support for her particular cause … so I agreed.

Our priest, who was well known for his healing charism, had reached the end of his homily. Looking up and out, he began firmly and repeatedly pounding his fist, while powerfully proclaiming, “If you believe in Jesus Christ, and that Jesus Christ is God, I tell you the truth. You are healed!

At that very moment, my knee felt as though it had been hit with a hammer … and hard! For the next ten or fifteen seconds, it hurt, it burned, and it throbbed.

We stood for the creed. The knee now felt fine. Kneeling proved to be no problem. Nor was going up for communion. It wasn’t until Mass was over that I began to suspect what might have happened.

I had walked into Mass with an old injury … damaged knee cartilage. My knee almost always hurt, but the injury was so old, that I had pretty much learned to accept it and work around it, without even thinking. I knew that it would eventually have to be surgically repaired, but I planned to put that surgery off for as long as possible.

I can honestly say that I hadn’t even thought of my old knee problem, that day … at least … before experiencing the “hammer blow”.

Now, walking out of church, I suddenly realized that my “bad” knee was actually feeling better than my “good” one. Standing outside for some twenty minutes, visiting with friends, there was not even a hint of any pain or stiffness. That was unusual!

But the real test would come the next morning, when I had to drop off my car for some repairs. Since the shop was some three and a half miles from home, I would usually have someone pick me up and drive me back. This time though, I decided to walk!

An hour and a half later (much of it up hill) I was home, with both knees fully intact. No pain. No problems!

It has been three years now, and my “bad” knee is still doing just fine. In fact, I had to do some serious thinking just to remember which one used to be “bad”. Praise God!

Unfortunately, my friend is still sick. Please pray for her.

This Week’s Ask Alice: “A Buddha statue in Catholic home” (Click on the included links for a comprehensive Lenten Catholic study)



Send A Question To Alice

She’ll answer as many questions as possible,
right here, every Thursday.

Email responses will also be provided, as time permits.

Chickie writes: While visiting the home of a terminally ill Catholic friend, I was surprised to find a large “Buddha” figurine prominently displayed there.

This seems like paganism and idolatry, and it really bothers me. It also makes me wonder if the presence of this idol might be somehow nullifying the prayers we have been offering up for her recovery.

I feel like I should say something to my friend, but she’s so sick right now, that it might just make things worse.

I’ve also considered writing a note to her husband about it, but I really don’t know if that would be a good idea, either.

None the less, I can’t imagine why good Catholic would have such an image in their home.

I’ve recently been praying hard on this. What do you think I should I do?

Alice answers: Does your Catholic friend have a crucifix or picture of Jesus in her house? If so, that is a good sign.

Since she is terminally ill, the present time is not opportune for arguing about the Buddha figurine in her home. Sick people and their caregivers are suffering much pain and can become upset easily. You are correct in thinking that your well-intentioned comments might make things worse. You don’t want your friend and her husband to slam the door on your future visits.

A Buddha statue cannot harm a baptized, faithful Catholic. The mere presence of the statue will not nullify prayers for her recovery.

Siddhartha Gautama Buddha (563-483 B.C.) was a spiritual teacher who founded the Buddhist religion. He was a human being, not a pagan god. If you saw a statue of Abraham Lincoln or Dr. Martin Luther King in a Catholic home, you would assume that the family felt deep respect for a good man. You would not worry that they were worshiping idols.

(Important note: The Buddhist religion typically incorporates many elements of two pagan belief systems known as Pantheism and Brahminism, which are both in serious conflict with many/most authentic Catholic/Christian beliefs and practices.)

If you feel compelled to speak, simply ask where your friend got the Buddha statue. If she received it as a gift from an Asian friend or purchased it as a decoration for her home, then the only problem is that your taste in decorating differs from hers.

If your Catholic friend said that she prays to Buddha, then she is mixing religions, which is definitely wrong. However, no demonic influence is likely to result from her misguided efforts, since she faithfully prays to our Triune God.

Please don’t allow a figurine to separate you from your sick friend. By arguing over Buddha, Satan might work his wiles and alienate your friend. Instead, ignore the Buddha while visiting, then say a prayer privately that the statue will be removed from her home. If your budget permits, you might buy a crucifix or statue of Jesus and wrap it up as a gift for your dear friend.

Above all, please stay focused on your mission to “visit the sick” and “pray for the living and the dead,” which are Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy. “Where two or three are gathered in My name, there am I in their midst.” (Matthew 18:20)

You are doing wonderful work in supporting your dying friend and her husband! Your charity pleases God (the real one). Just keep doing your job (prayerful visits) and leave your worries about the Buddha statue to God. That’s His job.

In Christ’s Love,

Alice

Click here to see all of Alice’s other columns

More about statues and images

Dirty Little Secret: Selling Your Egg Cells To Fertility Clinics Can Be (Very) Hazardous To Health.

A few years ago, Alexandra, a doctorate student, decided that selling her eggs to a fertility clinic was the perfect way to get an extra $3,000 she needed to pay for her tuition.

But then “things went south,” she recalls in “Eggsploitation,” a new documentary on the health hazards of paid egg donation. Alexandra and two other women, identified only by their first names, say their experiences with egg donation led to hospitalizations, ovary loss, stroke and possibly cancer.

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A last chance for lost souls


*** Click on picture to enlarge ***

The Lord is kind and merciful. Slow to anger.
Always willing to forgive.

Even a life-long, habitual sinner may have a “golden” opportunity, near the end of life, to make a final, good faith effort at repentance, since old age, illness, or infirmity often make it impractical to persist in a sinful lifestyle.

The end of a relationship, or the imminent death of a life partner may provide the necessary “window of opportunity” for repentance and conversion.

And near the end, it really doesn’t matter whether the person who was “living in sin” is gay or straight, since pretty much the same rules apply to all.

Absolution for sin is typically available in these types of cases, through the Sacrament of Reconciliation, so long as all known sins are confessed, authentic contrition is present (even if based primarily on the fear of hell) and a firm purpose of amendment exists.

When a person is very near death, the old, thorny and difficult issues of repentance virtually fade into irrelevance, while the process of genuine reconciliation with God, takes on crucial and strategic importance.

In short, when death is very near, the Church makes it as easy as possible for us sinners (and yes, even hypocrites) to be finally and fully reconciled with God.  Any Catholic priest will confirm this.

Virtually every family has someone in it who might “fall” into this category, so don’t pass up a last-minute opportunity to snatch an otherwise lost soul from Satan’s grasp. Make up your mind to become your loved ones best spiritual advocate … in these types of situations … even if it hurts!

God’s love, mercy, and forgiveness …
Don’t let your loved ones depart this existence without it!

The Conversion of Lee Atwater

Lee Atwater, former head of the Republican National Committee and advisor to and political strategist for Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, died a Catholic at age 40 on Good Friday, 1991. Shortly thereafter, Fidelity magazine, the predecessor to Culture Wars, interviewed John A. Hardon, S.J., concerning the circumstances of Mr. Atwater’s conversion. After receiving a transcription of the interview, Fr. Hardon asked that, in deference to Mr. Atwater’s family, it not be published so soon after Mr. Atwater’s death. Fr. Hardon died in December, 2000. The interview was conducted for Fidelity by James G. Bruen, Jr., and is here set forth for the first time.

Fidelity: Father Hardon, what can you tell us about Lee Atwater’s conversion?

Fr. Hardon: Let me talk for a few minutes on how I became involved in Lee Atwater’s life and his conversion. Let me then briefly describe how I became involved in the last year of Lee Atwater’s life and the glorious conversion.

There was a good friend of mine here in Washington by the name of Gary Maloney. I had Gary in class at the Notre Dame Institute. They came to know each other, and Gary was working with the Republican Party. One day Gary called me up. He asked if I could come to Washington the next day. I asked him what the emergency was. He said Lee Atwater, the head of the Republican Party, has had some seizures, blackouts, and he might go out any moment.

Gary told me he talked to Atwater, and asked him, Lee, are you afraid to die? He said, I sure am. And I suppose you’re afraid, Gary told Lee, of what’s going to happen to you after you die. Yes, I’m scared. So then Gary told Lee: Tell you what, there’s only one way you can be sure that when you die you’ll be safe in the next world. You need a Catholic priest to absolve you of all your sins. Lee said, Where do I get a Catholic priest, because I’m not a Catholic. I’ll get one, said Gary. So he called me up from the Republican offices and asked if I could come in the next day. And, he said, if you can make it, the Republican Party will take care of your transportation. We’ll have the tickets waiting for you.

So, whatever adjustment I had to make, I took an early flight from Metro airport in Detroit to National, and Gary Maloney was waiting for me. He took me right over to the Atwater residence.

F: What happened next?

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Terminal diagnosis: ‘I am stepping out of time into eternity’

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Late last year Tony Foley, a 41-year-old tax adviser, was told he had terminal cancer. In this frank account he explains how he has coped.

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Father Corapi Ready to Hit the Road Again

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Popular Preacher Returns

BY Anthony Flott

Father Corapi Ready To Hit the Road Again

Father John Corapi gets on a phone in his Montana office and asks someone to boost the volume. The assistant who helped arrange an interview with him had warned about this. “Speak loudly,” she said, “he’s hard of hearing.”

Father Corapi himself has never been hard to hear. For nearly two decades, his thundering voice has preached the Gospel with a forceful, meat-and-potatoes theology that’s made him among the most recognizable priests in the world.

But since August 2007, that voice has been relatively silent. At first, that was by choice — having traveled more than 2 million miles spreading the good news, Father Corapi quit public speaking to focus on writings and recordings. But just one week into that hiatus, a mysterious sickness began to ravage his body and left him mostly bedridden.

He’s recovering now and has headed back to the speaking circuit.

On Aug. 15, Father Corapi, a member of the Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity, will preach publicly for the first time in nearly two years, speaking on “The Lord and Giver of Life!” at a conference at HSBC Arena in Buffalo, N.Y.

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What Are “Last Rites”?

Q: What Are “Last Rites”?

A: Catholicism has always been a very practical faith, with grace giving sacraments that are appropriate for every key aspect of our human existence, including death.

Those who are ill, or in danger of death, benefit from the sacraments of Anointing, Reconciliation, and Holy Communion, which are often accompanied by a special type of indulgence, called the Apostolic Pardon.

The Apostolic Pardon  (Apostolic Blessing) must be administered by a priest. The pardon does not forgive sins. It typically makes time in Purgatory unnecessary. Many of today’s priests don’t routinely administer the Pardon, so you may need to specifically request it. I suggest you print it out and keep a copy nearby.

Here’s the text:

By the Faculty which the Apostolic See has given me, I grant you a plenary indulgence for the remission of all your sins, and I bless you. In the Name of the Father and the Son + and the Holy Sprit. Amen.

Receipt of these powerful spiritual resources acts to help perfect one’s relationship with the Almighty, by finally reconciling body and soul with God.

If death is the result, than there should be little concern about divine judgment or eternal damnation, since the primary mission of the church, the primary purpose of the sacraments, and the express will of God, is salvation.

If the person rallies and recovers, there’s a very good possibility of a permanent spiritual conversion.

These “Last Rites” may be repeated as often as is necessary, and they are typically also very comforting for loved ones, who remain behind.

Click here for complete details