Today’s Question: What currently available Bible translation is the ONLY one considered to be infallible and inerrant, according to the Council of Trent and the Holy Catholic Church?

Question: What currently available Bible translation is the ONLY one considered to be infallible and inerrant, according to the Council of Trent (and hence, officially, by the Holy Catholic Church)?

Answer: The Church has already stated, extraordinarily at the Council of Trent and ordinarily through constant usage, that the Old Vulgate is “authentic” and “free from error”.

Therefore, the only edition of Sacred Scripture we should be using for anything is either the Old Vulgate itself, or if you can’t functionally understand Latin, a translation of that text. Anything else is simply not guaranteed.

Trent, Session IV “Moreover, the same sacred and holy Synod … has decided and declares that the said old Vulgate edition, which has been approved by the Church itself through long usage for so many centuries in public lectures, disputations, sermons, and expositions, be considered authentic, and that no one under any pretext whatsoever dare to presume or reject it.

See the entire article here. Be sure also, to view all the comments, since that’s where the two above passages, are located.

Also note that the Catholic Church of that time was standing up for the truth of the Old Latin Vulgate, as opposed to many of the “new” Protestant translation efforts that were underway, at the time. Of course, none of our current, English language Catholic Bible translations existed back then, either.

This writer agrees with the author of the article that one of the the worst Bible translations of all time (even with most Protestant efforts included) is probably the disgraceful, vapid and totally uninspiring, “Catholic In Name Only” New American Bible.

Two terms you won’t find mentioned in the current Catechism of the Catholic Church

The Church Militant

The Church Triumphant

From the Catechism of Trent (Circa 1902-1907):

The Church consists principally of two parts, the one called the Church triumphant; the other, the Church
militant.

The Church triumphant is that most glorious and happy assemblage of blessed spirits, and of those who have triumphed over the world, the flesh, and the iniquity of Satan, and are now exempt and safe from the troubles of this life and enjoy everlasting bliss.

The Church militant is the society of all the faithful still dwelling on earth. It is called militant, because it wages eternal war with those implacable enemies, the world, the flesh and the devil.

We are not, however, to infer that there are two Churches. The Church triumphant and the Church militant are
two constituent parts of one Church; one part going before, and now in the possession of its heavenly country;
the other, following every day, until at length, united with our Saviour, it shall repose in endless felicity.

Why were these terms “cast off”? Was it an oversight? An intentional deletion? Politics? Something else?

How are Catholics expected to act, when they cannot even define themselves (or the church) according to traditional and (at least, previously) well recognized and universally accepted criterion?

I suggest you ask your local bishop to explain it for you.

In the mean time, it’s important to realize that while the Catechism of the Catholic Church is an excellent, well written document, it has already been subject to substantial revisions … so it’s not inherently without error.

Now that the most glaring errors in content have been corrected, it’s high time someone started correcting the ERRORS of OMISSION … which still remain … and are far more numerous.

*** More on this in future posts ***