Holy water: “Industrial-strength spiritual Lysol.”

Part of an interview with a former Satanist:

CWR: How would you advise the faithful to keep the devil out of their lives?

Deborah: First of all, in this life he’s always going to be in your life and close by. So, you have to protect yourself by going to Mass and receiving the Eucharist. It’s powerful protection. Holy water is extremely effective. I call it “industrial-strength spiritual Lysol.” I keep it in my home and regularly bless myself.

The sacrament of confession is important. One of the fastest ways for the demon to enter our lives is through unconfessed sin. I freely tell people, Catholic or not, that the Catholic Church is the only church that has the tools to deal effectively with the demonic. That includes devotion to the Blessed Mother.

Also, be careful about your hobbies and entertainment. The drinking, partying, carousing lifestyle can create an opening for the devil to come in; I also recommend people avoid slasher movies.

Read more

Herman Cain: No abortion, under any circumstance.

Appearing on NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ on Sunday, Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain said that he didn’t agree with abortion “under any circumstance.”

Link to video

John Allen knows his Catholic “stuff”

“Most people assume that knowing how the sausage is ground is hazardous to your spiritual health, but in my case it’s had the opposite effect. I already knew there were politics and careerism and petty jealousies in the church before I started this gig, so there weren’t too many scales to fall from my eyes.”

“The surprise has been how much more I’ve discovered. … I’ve seen how the Catholic faith has inspired ordinary people to do mind-blowing things, such as serving the poor and healing divisions and fighting corruption and saving souls.”

“My experience has helped me to see beyond the normal preoccupation with scandals and division and heavy-handed exercises of authority, as important and unavoidable as those stories are, to how much more there is to Catholic life.”

“In the end, that’s deepened my faith rather than causing some existential crisis,” he said.

Read more

All about Pope Benedict XVI – from a priest who knows him

You have a long-standing relationship with Pope Benedict XVI. Can you describe when you first met him?

Father Fessio: I first met Fr. Joseph Ratzinger when I arrived in Regensburg, (then West Germany) in the fall of 1972. I began my doctoral studies there and he was my doctoral director.

How that happened is a story in itself. I had begun my theological studies in France at the Jesuit Theologate in Lyons. There I was befriended by Fr. Henri de Lubac, S.J., a wonderful man of the Church and a renowned theologian. When the time came for me to decide upon the subject for a doctorate I asked his advice. He immediately told me that I should do my doctorate on Fr. Hans Urs von Balthasar whom he considered one of the greatest theologians of the era, if not all time. When I asked him where I should do it he immediately said, “Go to Regensburg and do it under Fr. Joseph Ratzinger; he’s a fine young theologian.” Fr. de Lubac graciously wrote to Fr. Ratzinger on my behalf and Fr. Ratzinger who was not accepting many new graduate students since he had so many already, accepted Fr. de Lubac’s recommendation.

Joseph Ratzinger was then as he is now, a very quiet and gracious person, always willing to listen; but when he speaks, he speaks with great clarity and depth of understanding. Even then one felt a presence because of his goodness, his openness, and his wisdom.

Read more

New York Archbishop’s “60 Minutes” Interview: “When it comes to baseball, I think I can be pro-choice.”


The interview with New York’s Catholic Archbishop Timothy Dolan, speaks for itself.

Not a hatchet job. Not a softball, p.r. exercise, either.  The same is true for the other “bonus” interviews on various, high profile church issues of the day. The main interview runs slightly more than 11 minutes.

Well worth watching.

For example:

He lives in a small mansion connected by a tunnel to St. Patrick’s, where each day he must pass his own final resting place – the crypt – a constant reminder that his path to glory leads but to the grave.

“I’m supposed to go here,” he told Safer, looking at a small “available space” in the crypt. “Now although Cardinal Egan teases me that he wonders if one is gonna be enough, so I don’t know what we’re gonna have to, I might have to rent a space and a half.”

Watch the video

Read the transcript

Cardinal Mahoney: “I’m surprised that more people didn’t leave the church over this.”

At the end of our two-hour conversation, he came back to the subject, describing “the incredible sorrow” he has “for what the victims of these terrible wrongs went through, and are going through. I’ve met with more than 90 victims. I watched all the videotaped depositions of those involved in the settlement. I could only watch for a time, and then I had to go to the chapel. They were heartbreaking. I also read all the victims’ statements. One, I simply couldn’t believe the terrible things that had been done. It took me three days to read; an hour of reading and then back to the chapel. I had no idea what these people had suffered. It still has a profound impact on me.

“I have apologized to those who suffered whenever I could. I can never say, ‘I apologize’ enough times.”

Read more

Chilling insider interview: Abortion and the occult

The clinic where my mother worked was pervaded with occult imagery and practices.  There was goddess art and statuary in the office, waiting, counseling, and recovery room areas, and new age music (occasionally including goddess chants and songs) was piped throughout.  The counselors were primarily chosen for their spiritual qualifications, and a few did not even have a degree in a relevant field (ie psychology, counseling, social work).  One was a trained chef turned sex worker (or “sacred prostitute”, as they preferred to think of it).

After the clinic closed for the evening, the staff would all smoke marijuana together and occasionally take hallucinogens if they were available – this was viewed as a spiritual practice, not a recreational one (they were rather scornful of people who used drugs just to get high for fun rather than to ‘open their minds’ to ‘spiritual realities and higher planes of existence’).

There were also special ceremonies involved when members of the clinic staff got intentionally pregnant in order to have abortions, which would be conducted after hours with a large group.  I was not welcome at these ceremonies since I had never had an abortion myself (at the time), so I can’t give details, but on one occasion I babysat the infant daughter of a clinic worker during one, upstairs from the clinic, and I remember hearing bits of song/chanting and that the doctor was not present (he was male and the ceremony was female only), so the abortion was obviously being performed by an unqualified person.  The women at the clinic were trained in “underground” abortion techniques in case of Roe v Wade being overturned.

Read more