Seen on the web: The latest info on the status of Father Corapi

According to his most recent office manager, Justin Meccia, John Corapi returned from a hunting trip in September and gave notice to Justin and other Santa Cruz Media staff that he was closing his business.

His website has not been updated significantly since then (with the exception of posts made in his name to promote his post-July products, the series on abortion and Part 1 of the DVD version of his promised biography), phone calls are not answered, and mail is returned. There have been some unauthorized attempts to sell his old inventory on a couple of pop-up websites, but these disappear quickly. There have been no official updates from the SOLT or any other Church authority in this case since July.

Apparently he continues to reside in Montana, keeping a low profile and complying with the requirements that he not represent himself as a priest in public. The lawsuit has not been withdrawn, though no action has been publicly announced. The various Facebook pages that rose up to support or criticize him have dwindled to a few members each, issuing regular shots at one another but providing no light.

Link

John Corapi (a.k.a. The Black SheepDog) launches new website

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Quo vadis, John Corapi?

From Wikipedia:

Quo vadis? is a Latin phrase meaning “Where are you going?” or “Whither goest thou?”

The modern usage of the phrase refers to Christian tradition, related in the apocryphal Acts of Peter (Vercelli Acts XXXV), in which Saint Peter meets Jesus as Peter is fleeing from likely crucifixion in Rome.

Peter asks Jesus the question “Quo vadis?”

Jesus’ answer, “I am going to Rome to be crucified again.” (Eo Romam iterum crucifigi) prompts Peter to gain the courage to continue his ministry and eventually become a martyr.

Quo Vadis, John Corapi?

Jimmy Akin: Fr. Corapi’s Lawsuit against Accuser (Full Text)

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Clohessy disturbed by Corapi lawsuit

The Rev. John Corapi, who served as the director of Catholic Faith Formation in Sacramento in the 1990s, filed a lawsuit in the 11th Judicial District Court of Montana, where he now lives. He alleges that his accuser committed libel and that a letter she wrote to his religious superiors contained “numerous false, malicious and unprivileged statements” about the priest. He is suing for punitive and unspecified compensatory damages.

Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests on Wednesday publicized Corapi’s lawsuit, which was filed in April.

“I think it is reprehensible that he would sue her,” said David Clohessy, national director of the victims rights group. “Clearly, he is trying to intimidate her.” He said a priest suing his accuser is unusual.

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More on the Corapi affair: That “Black Sheep Dog” just might turn out to be a fox.

by Doug Lawrence

One doesn’t need to be a rocket scientist to realize that the only real power anyone (including the Catholic Church) had over John Corapi was the suspension of his priestly faculties … and once Corapi decided to simply “walk away” … that power was effectively nullified.

Looking to the future, it is also logical (taking John at his word) to assume that his civil suit will successfully prevail, resulting in a retraction of all the allegations against him.

At that point, there will be nothing for the Church to investigate. Then, Corapi and the Church can move towards some type of positive reconciliation/repatriation.

All will appear together, suitably somber and contrite, appropriate sums of money will change hands, and Father John’s priestly suspension will be summarily lifted.

If the sums are large enough, his following loyal enough, and his public relations efforts strong enough, Father John Corapi might even be able to keep living and working on his own. (There is existing Church precedent for all of this.)

In the mean time, The Black Sheep Dog” will shortly have a new book to sell … and as they say, “You just can’t buy publicity like this!”

Bishop emeritus of Corpus Christi, Rene Gracida sheds a bit of light on the Corapi affair

I believe that he is justified in not seeking to clear his name through a canonical process; at the present time such processes are very flawed in most dioceses.  Rather I would like to believe that he intends to try to clear his name through the civil courts.

Since I believe that his accuser is a former manager of his media company who he terminated with some kind termination agreement, and since she has evidently sought revenge for her termination by writing to the Bishop of Corpus Christi denouncing Father John, I believe that it is possible for him to do so and I wish him every success in such an endeavor.

The basis for his lawsuit would probably be defamation of character, libel, extortion, breech of contract, or whatever.

Reading some of the comments on his blog I am appalled at the viciousness of some of them.  It is obvious that there is very little if any love in the hearts of some of the writers.  It is almost as though some of those writers are filled with hatred for the Catholic Church and/or its priests.  It is possible to disagree about almost anything without resorting to ad hominem personal attacks.

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Brief editorial in light of the recent Father Corapi announcement and all the other sad, weird things transpiring in the Catholic Church, these days.

by Doug Lawrence

If I thought the Catholic Church was just another corporate entity, I would have “sold all my stock” and “washed my hands of it” many, many years ago.

It’s not. So I didn’t.

I think Father Corapi has indeed been wronged, is suffering from some sort of illness, is not in his right mind, and is in need of our continued prayers, assistance and support … not in starting up a new organization … but in being once again reconciled with the church, his religious order, and the Catholic ministerial priesthood.

It would be a real shame and a grave sin to do anything less.

I have faith that someone in authority will step up to champion this process. And at this point, it doesn’t matter whether the allegations against Father Corapi are ever substantiated or refuted. Reconciliation is what’s necessary … and in the Catholic Church, reconciliation has never required judgment, or even a definitive finding of fault.

In fact, the opposite is true.

God is willing to forgive as soon as we admit that we may have fallen short, that we are truly sorry for all of our failures, and we resolve to make a good faith effort to try to do better, in the future. Reconciliation eliminates the need for judgment, clearing the way so grace can supernaturally operate, for the benefit of the whole church. That’s the beauty of it!

Why should we, who are encouraged to imitate Jesus Christ in word and deed, even attempt to apply any other standard to the Corapi affair?

The man Corapi has been a good and faithful priest for twenty years. Preaching the truth in a particularly effective way, he has brought countless souls to Jesus Christ. The allegations made against him are not particularly outrageous or grievous. Certainly not unforgivable! How is it then, that we all seem to be willing to throw in the towel, pridefully retreat to our respective corners, claim victory, and simply walk away?

If all parties involved in this mess can’t get together and sign-on to a joint, traditionally Catholic reconciliation strategy, then perhaps my assessment of the supernatural nature of the Catholic Church is wrong after all, the Body of Christ is in much worse shape than anyone ever suspected, and it’s time to do some strategic short-selling.

God, help us gracefully recover from this terrible scandal. Please!

Complete article summary and chronology of the Father Corapi affair

Father Corapi quits the Catholic priesthood. Starts new ministry outside the church.


His
eight and one-half minute long
You Tube video statement
says it all.

The new John Corapi website

The new facebook page

The old facebook page

A complete summary
of all the Father Corapi articles posted,
to-date.

Editor’s note: ???????!