A must read: Father Leonardo makes an impassioned plea.


….Look brothers. God wants nothing more to do with this “Church”.  He is vomiting it from His mouth, this “beautiful church of the Council,” as someone called it. The beautiful church of the Council. God wants nothing more to do with it.

And is destroying it covering it with ridicule. A church that no longer preaches the truth, does not put God in first place. A church that gives communion to remarried divorcees, which admits homosexuality and all the vices.

What will God do with such a church?

With a church which tells you, “You can do whatever you want.”

What will God do with such a church?

It is as if a cop tell the thief, “You can steal is not a crime.” To the drug dealer: “You can do it is not a crime.” To the mafioso: “You can do anything you want is not a crime.”

But a cop like that: what’s the use of him if a cop doesn’t pull out his gun to defend the innocent and fight the wicked. What’s the use of this cop?

But think brothers, really think. Will everything go back to the way it was?

No, no, we are in the midst of the end times. We are in the midst of an great sign.

God is destroying this beautiful church of the council to rebuild the true church the church of tradition, the church of Latin, the church of true spirituality, the church of holy doctrine, the church of the true magisterium and not all the nonsense that we have to listen to every morning.

The Church of Padre Pio, and of all the Saints.

Padre Pio! Padre Pio!  If Padre Pio returned to life, what would he say?

He would immediately die of heat attack again. But first he would have the time to say the two words, that he repeats in his life in the moments of his holy wrath. He was want to use these words. He would say two words. Get out of here! You butchers of the body of Christ! Get out of here! This would Padre Pio say.

So, brothers we must start again, As the spider does day after day with aristocratic detachment and perseverance. We must we must convert to tradition, to Latin, to the true spirituality to the holy doctrine, to the true magisterium, to the Saints.

This is direction of our conversion, pushing ourselves towards the divine things, throwing upwards the anchor of our salvation and of our hope and the tenacious threads of faith, and of a love that does not surrender.

Upwards towards heavenly things! not towards the earth.

See the full text and video

Catholic cartoon trivia

Gumby

“Gumby” gets his name from the Latin, which means “flexible”.

My response to a reader comment shocked me.

BHCommwAl

Remembering simpler times. Were they really better?

by Doug Lawrence

Responding to a recent comment about the teachings of the pre-Vatican II Catholic Church, I wrote:

I lived during the era of the pre-Vatican II Church, so I’m an eye-witness.

Way back then, 75% of Catholics attended Mass every Sunday. Urban renewal projects had yet to break up and disperse faithful Catholic communities. Contraception and abortion were not yet central issues of the day. The clarity of Catholic teaching was superb.

The quality of Catholic schools was excellent and the tuition was easily affordable, even for families with many children. Catholic churches were beautiful. Men and women religious were numerous, orthodox, and wholly dedicated to their work.

The liturgy was traditional, Latin, and quite adequate. The seminaries had yet to be liberalized and feminized, so there was an abundance of good priests available to serve the needs of most parishes.

In those days, the Catholic Church was respected, all around the world. We had a strong Pope in the Vatican, no nonsense bishops running most of the dioceses, and Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen proclaiming Catholic truth to the masses every week, on network TV.

Of course, there were a few “bad apples” and scandals, even then. But the pre-Vatican II church knew how to properly handle them.

Then there was Vatican II … somebody put the radicals in charge … the church tore itself apart, lost its focus, along with much of its good sense, and with a few exceptions, things have been going downhill ever since. 

Were things really that good, back then? Comments, anyone?

Thanks to Cathy for the original comment!

Feeling “down”? Enjoy listening to “The Litany of the Saints” in English or Latin.

rosarysaints

Listen in English (mp3) (about 5 minutes)

Listen in Latin (mp3) (about 16 minutes)

Visit the site for these and more free Catholic downloads

Revised Roman Missal: They should have put in just a bit of Latin.

by Doug Lawrence

By far the greatest difficulty with the newly revised Mass translation is remembering to say “And with your spirit” instead of “And also with you.”

The “old” response is so ingrained as to be virtually automatic, with probably half or more of the congregation routinely “flubbing it”.

Perhaps things will improve over time, but the elegant and traditional solution (and one that will really irritate the libs) is to go back to the Latin! (What’s the problem? The liturgy already retains certain phrases, in Greek.)

Dominus vobiscum. Et cum spiritu tuo.

(“The Lord be with you. And with your spirit.”)

Most of today’s Catholics have never heard it, so there should be absolutely no problem with prior conditioning or habit.

Note to surviving, pre-Vatican II Catholics: Please try to remember that “Et cum spiritu tuo”  is NOT the emergency phone number for the Vatican!

You might be a progressive Catholic if …

… you think “Latin” refers only to South America, or some “hot” dance moves.

Traditional Latin Mass Explained


The theology of the Catholic Faith is expressed in the rich symbolism of the extraordinary form of the Roman rite, commonly known as the Traditional Latin Mass.

Read all about it

What was wrong with the old ICEL translation of the Mass?

“New” (top) vs. “Traditional” (below)


From God’s perspective (or man’s, for that matter)
which Mass looks more like genuine, authentic worship?

Anyway, that’s the most striking thing I noticed about the ICEL, just from contrasting Eucharistic Prayer I with a word-for-word rendition of the Latin Canon. God is dethroned; we are no longer servants offering a Pure Victim, an Holy Victim, an Unblemished Victim unto God’s most illustrious majesty, which we beg of Him to accept with a serene countenance. Rather, we are “ministers,” bossing God around like fussy matrons in an hurry, so unimpressed with the sacred that we tend not to qualify anything with superlatives or ennobling adjectives.

Even where such adjectives are used, something seems amiss. It may seem small, but I think there is a big difference between offering a Pure Victim, an Holy Victim, an Unstained Victim unto the Most Illustrious Majesty of God, and offering a sacrifice to the God of glory and majesty… just like there is a difference between Jesus’ “glorious Ascension into the heavens,” and Jesus “ascending into glory” (whatever that means). I.e., in subtle ways, even in the places where positive adjectives are used of God’s actions or attributes, the phrasing is usually reworked so that any sense of subordination to the Divine Attributes, or awe of the loftiness of the divine actions, is replaced by a simple acknowledgment that God happens to be great. It’s almost as if it were saying, “I’m not offering this unto Your Majesty, I’m offering it to You, Who happen to be majestic… but, don’t expect me to trip over myself in adulation just because You happen to be majestic. After all, I am Church; I am child of God; I am God. Lord, I am worthy that You should come under my roof. Because You said the word, I have no further need of You.”

In short, I think that is why they eliminated all the “majestic” and “noble” sentiments of the Canon, even in places where seemingly no pet project of the liberal agenda was involved. It may seem like there was nothing to be gained from demoting “This All-Illustrious and Venerable Chalice” to “the cup.” But, if you detest any hint of men fawning before an Holiness transcendent of their limitations, you especially can’t bear for a mere “cup” to capture man’s awe and devotion.

More comments from Father Z’s site

Film Critic Roger Ebert waxes fondly about his Catholic roots

…In my childhood the Church arched high above everything. I was awed by its ceremonies. Years later I agreed completely with Pauline Kael when she said that the three greatest American directors of the 1970s–Scorsese, Altman and Coppola–had derived much of their artistic richness from having grown up in the pre-Vatican Two era of Latin, incense, mortal sins, indulgences, dire sufferings in hell, Gregorian chant, and so on. Protestants and even Jews were victims, I suppose, of sensory deprivation.

The parish priest was the greatest man in the town. Our priest was Fr. J. W. McGinn, who was a good and kind man and not given to issuing fiery declarations from the pulpit. Of course in Catholic grade school I took the classes for altar boys. We learned by heart all the Latin of the Mass, and I believe I could serve Mass to this day. There was something satisfying about the sound of Latin.

Introibo ad altare Dei.
Ad Deum qui laitificat juventutem meum.

“I will go to the altar of God. The God who gives joy to my youth.” There was a “thunk” to the syllables, measured and confident, said aloud the way they looked. We learned in those classes when you stood. When you knelt. When you sat during the reading of scripture and the sermon. When you rang the bell, when you brought the water and wine. How to carefully hold the paten under the chins of communicants so a fragment of Holy Eucharist would not go astray. Later, there were dress rehearsals on the St. Pat’s altar.

For years I served early Mass one morning a week, riding my bike to church and then onward to St. Mary’s for the start of the school day. On First Fridays, the Altar and Rosary Society supplied coffee, hot chocolate and sweet rolls in the basement of the rectory. When you served at a wedding, the best man was expected to tip you fifty cents. When you served at a funeral you kept a very straight face. During Lent there were the Stations of the Cross, the priest and servers moving around the church to pause in front of artworks depicting Christ’s progress toward Calvary. Walking from one station to the next, we intoned the verses of a dirge.

At the cross, her station keeping,
Stood the mournful mother weeping,
Close to Jesus to the last.

Read more

The Charismatic Latin Mass


Over the Centuries the Latin Mass came to be very strictly regulated and some of the spontaneous and charismatic qualities were codified and formalized. But such was not always the case. In each era the Church showed forth joy and exuberance in ways often subtle to us now. But when they were first experienced, before they were formalized there was a kind of charismatic quality to it all.

To those who think the Latin Mass dull, I tell these things. To those who think the Gospel liturgies too exuberant I tell these things. I hope to build bridges. There are more similarities in the roots than we might think. One of the fruits of the Spirit is Joy. And when God is truly encountered in the sacred liturgy, joy can’t be far behind.

Link to article and video

A Catholic Catechism on the Bible – Definitely worth a look!

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