Archbishop Sartain’s full homily to the members of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) on the feast of the Assumption.

Full text of Archbishop Sartain’s homily

Editor’s note – A relevant excerpt from the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

1558 “Episcopal consecration confers, together with the office of sanctifying, also the offices of teaching and ruling. . . . In fact . . . by the imposition of hands and through the words of the consecration, the grace of the Holy Spirit is given, and a sacred character is impressed in such wise that bishops, in an eminent and visible manner, take the place of Christ himself, teacher, shepherd, and priest, and act as his representative (in Eius persona agant).”37 “By virtue, therefore, of the Holy Spirit who has been given to them, bishops have been constituted true and authentic teachers of the faith and have been made pontiffs and pastors.”38

1559 “One is constituted a member of the episcopal body in virtue of the sacramental consecration and by the hierarchical communion with the head and members of the college.”39 The character and collegial nature of the episcopal order are evidenced among other ways by the Church’s ancient practice which calls for several bishops to participate in the consecration of a new bishop.40 In our day, the lawful ordination of a bishop requires a special intervention of the Bishop of Rome, because he is the supreme visible bond of the communion of the particular Churches in the one Church and the guarantor of their freedom.

1560 As Christ’s vicar, each bishop has the pastoral care of the particular Church entrusted to him, but at the same time he bears collegially with all his brothers in the episcopacy the solicitude for all the Churches: “Though each bishop is the lawful pastor only of the portion of the flock entrusted to his care, as a legitimate successor of the apostles he is, by divine institution and precept, responsible with the other bishops for the apostolic mission of the Church.”41

1561 The above considerations explain why the Eucharist celebrated by the bishop has a quite special significance as an expression of the Church gathered around the altar, with the one who represents Christ, the Good Shepherd and Head of his Church, presiding.42

Nuns Gone Wild: A Trip Down Memory Lane

Those of you who wonder why the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and the American Bishops initiated a reform of the leadership of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR), should take a little trip down memory lane.

Vast sectors of women religious in the USA have for decades been infested with a radical feminism so poisonous that many of them, especially in leadership, have even come to defend the killing of babies.

The problems in many communities of some are deeply rooted and, like all weeds, are hard to extirpate.

The following is a review of some key figures in this history of dissent and defiance. Some of these nuns have faded from view and others are still quite visible.

These are, as it were, the “church Mothers” on which their alternative Magisterium of Nuns was founded.

They all have a lot to answer for.

Read more from Father Z

Submitted by AndyP/Doria2

They just don’t make nuns like they used to…

“I’m stunned . . .We haven’t violated any teaching, we have just been raising questions and interpreting politics,” Sr. Simone Campbell, head of Network, a Catholic social justice lobby, told The New York Times.

Benedictine Sr. Joan Chittister, former president of the LCWR, told the National Catholic Reporter:

“When you set out to reform a people, a group, who have done nothing wrong, you have to have an intention, a motivation that is not only morally biased, but actually immoral.  

“Because you are attempting to control people for one thing and one thing only — and that is for thinking, for being willing to discuss the issues of the age . . . If we stop thinking, if we stop demanding the divine right to think, and to see that as a Catholic gift, then we are betraying the church no matter what the powers of the Church see as an inconvenient truth in their own times.”

Read more

Editor’s note: Ms. Campbell and Ms. Chittister intentionally fib when they “bill” themselves as Catholic, while consistently failing to affirm all the truths of the Catholic faith.

In truth, these ladies are radical feminists who have no allegiance to anything but their own novel ideas. Unfortunately, many if not most of those ideas have little in common with the authentic Roman Catholic faith.

There was a time when people like that … whatever their gender … were rightly termed Protestants … or even … pagans.

Better think fast, sisters … the “jig” appears to be … “up”!

Can you recognize new age heresy, when you see it?

The Catholic Key, diocesan newspaper of the Diocese of Kansas City-St Joseph, reported that a 2007 keynote address at the annual assembly of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious had provoked “particular concern and discussion.” The address, “A Marginal Life: Pursuing Holiness in the 21st Century,” was given by Sinsinawa Dominican Sister Laurie Brink, in which she discussed the decline of many women’s religious orders and criticized some successful new orders as “acquiescent” to others’ expectations, the Catholic News Agency reported.

Sr. Laurie said a “sojourning congregation” was “the dynamic option for Religious Life.” Such a congregation, she said, involves “moving beyond the Church, even beyond Jesus.”

“A sojourning congregation is no longer ecclesiastical,” said Sr. Laurie. “It has grown beyond the bounds of institutional religion. Its search for the Holy may have begun rooted in Jesus as the Christ, but deep reflection, study and prayer have opened it up to the spirit of the Holy in all of creation. Religious titles, institutional limitations, ecclesiastical authorities no longer fit this congregation, which in most respects is Post-Christian.”

Editor’s note: This person could be on the poster-woman for why there should not be women priests. We’ve already got enough trouble with the men. 

Read the whole article

Ungodly Rage (E-Book) – The Hidden Face of Catholic Feminism

rageBy Matt C. Abbott

In light of the recent story about notorious pro-abortion nun Donna Quinn’s “moonlighting” as an abortion mill escort — deathscort would be a more appropriate term, actually — and in light of Rome’s doctrinal investigation of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, I offer the following lengthy excerpt of Catholic author Donna Steichen’s book Ungodly Rage: The Hidden Face of Catholic Feminism.

Although published in 1991, much of Mrs. Steichen’s excellent analysis of radical feminism’s infiltration into the Church is still timely and thought-provoking. Thanks to Mrs. Steichen and Mark Brumley of Ignatius Press for allowing me to reprint this material (minus footnotes).

The more things “change,” the more they stay the same, indeed.

Read some excerpts

Download the E-Book